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Isaac Harvey Gale

Birth
Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland
Death
4 Jan 1902 (aged 49–50)
Folkestone, Shepway District, Kent, England
Burial
Folkestone, Shepway District, Kent, England
Plot
Plot 4, grave 3370 UNMARKED GRAVE
Memorial ID
205780615 View Source

He was an army pensioner and died at 16 Great Fenchurch Street Folkestone. He was a trumpeter in the 17th Lancers, known as the 'death or glory boys,' and is said to have sounded the charge at Ulundi in the Zulu War. Mistranscribed on Ancestry burials as Isaac Harrey Gall.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 January 1902
Inquest
An inquest was held on Monday into the death of Isaac Henry Gale, a man well known in East Folkestone as the trumpeter in the 17th Lancers (Death or Glory Boys), who sounded the charge at Ulandi in the Zulu war.

Joseph Whiting said: I am the landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms public house, Fenchurch Street. I identify the body as that of Isaac Gale. He was about 49 or 50 years of age, and lived with me at a cottage adjoining the Bricklayers' Arms. He shared a bedroom with a companion of his. He depended principally on a pension, and did other casual work. He drew his pension on the 1st of January. It was about £5. The last time I saw deceased was about 11 o'clock on Friday night. Before going to be I went to look round, and found deceased on the bed, fully dressed. I thought he had been enjoying himself too much. I have had occasion to speak to Gale more than once in connection with taking too much to drink. On Saturday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, deceased's bedmate came and reported to me that Gale was dead.

By the Chief Constable: I tried to rouse the deceased, but he did not take much notice. I thought he had been drinking too freely and was in a deep slumber. I had seen deceased drunk before, but he did not seem any different than on other occasions.

By Dr. Barrett: I could not say whether deceased always snored when he was drunk.

Sarah Betts said: I live at 20, Great Fenchurch Street, and am the wife of George Betts, a fisherman. I have known Gale a long time. I saw him between twelve and one on Friday. He was coming up Great Fenchurch Street. To me he appeared to have been drinking. He was staggering from one side to the other and fell upon the back of his head. I went to his assistance. I had seen deceased drunk before several times. I asked a passer-by to help me pick Gale up. I could then smell his breath, which was very strong of drink. When picked up, Gale said "Thank you very much for picking me up; thank you all round". He also said "I've had some drink, I know". He did not complain about his fall; he staggered along beside the wall and went indoors.

By Dr. Barrett: He only had about 10 yards to walk to the house from the place where he fell.

Arthur Stokes said: I live at 13, Fenchurch Street, and am a labourer. I help Mr. Whiting at times. I knew the deceased well. The first time I saw him on Friday was at 9.30 p.m. I was going round the rooms, and upon going into deceased's apartment I found him lying between the two beds. He was on his side asleep and snoring. I called for assistance to help him on to the bed. A man named John Thomas came and gave me the required assistance. We put him on the bed, and I did not see him again until the following morning. I had seen him drunk before, and thought he was so on this occasion. On Saturday morning, between 8 and 9, I went into deceased's room and found him dead. He was on the bed, and I at once went and told Mr. Whiting.

Harry Pope said: I live at No. 16a, Fenchurch Street, and I shared a bedroom with Gale. On Friday I saw him about one o'clock. I met him in the street. He was sitting on the window ledge of a shop. He aid to me "Hello, Popey", and I went on. He had had a little to drink, quite sufficient to let me know he was moderately "full". We have slept together for about two years. He always had been a drinker. When I got home that night it was twenty minutes to two. I struck a match and looked at him. He was on the bed with his clothes on. I had seen him once before with his clothes on at night time. Deceased stopped snoring about a quarter or half past two. I looked over my shoulder when I woke about 8.30 and found that Gale was dead.

Dr. W.P. Barrett said: I have today made a post mortem examination on deceased. I found a large clot of blood covering about one third of the left side of the brain. I also examined the organs of the body and found strong indications of heart disease and disease of the main arteries. The liver was small and very hard. I formed the opinion that the man died from what we usually term apoplexy. He had been drinking, but that was not the actual cause of death, but had accelerated death.

The jury found that deceased had died from apoplexy, accelerated by excessive drinking.
Transcribed on http://www.dover-kent.com/Bricklayers-Arms-Folkestone.html

He was an army pensioner and died at 16 Great Fenchurch Street Folkestone. He was a trumpeter in the 17th Lancers, known as the 'death or glory boys,' and is said to have sounded the charge at Ulundi in the Zulu War. Mistranscribed on Ancestry burials as Isaac Harrey Gall.

Folkestone Chronicle 11 January 1902
Inquest
An inquest was held on Monday into the death of Isaac Henry Gale, a man well known in East Folkestone as the trumpeter in the 17th Lancers (Death or Glory Boys), who sounded the charge at Ulandi in the Zulu war.

Joseph Whiting said: I am the landlord of the Bricklayers' Arms public house, Fenchurch Street. I identify the body as that of Isaac Gale. He was about 49 or 50 years of age, and lived with me at a cottage adjoining the Bricklayers' Arms. He shared a bedroom with a companion of his. He depended principally on a pension, and did other casual work. He drew his pension on the 1st of January. It was about £5. The last time I saw deceased was about 11 o'clock on Friday night. Before going to be I went to look round, and found deceased on the bed, fully dressed. I thought he had been enjoying himself too much. I have had occasion to speak to Gale more than once in connection with taking too much to drink. On Saturday morning, between eight and nine o'clock, deceased's bedmate came and reported to me that Gale was dead.

By the Chief Constable: I tried to rouse the deceased, but he did not take much notice. I thought he had been drinking too freely and was in a deep slumber. I had seen deceased drunk before, but he did not seem any different than on other occasions.

By Dr. Barrett: I could not say whether deceased always snored when he was drunk.

Sarah Betts said: I live at 20, Great Fenchurch Street, and am the wife of George Betts, a fisherman. I have known Gale a long time. I saw him between twelve and one on Friday. He was coming up Great Fenchurch Street. To me he appeared to have been drinking. He was staggering from one side to the other and fell upon the back of his head. I went to his assistance. I had seen deceased drunk before several times. I asked a passer-by to help me pick Gale up. I could then smell his breath, which was very strong of drink. When picked up, Gale said "Thank you very much for picking me up; thank you all round". He also said "I've had some drink, I know". He did not complain about his fall; he staggered along beside the wall and went indoors.

By Dr. Barrett: He only had about 10 yards to walk to the house from the place where he fell.

Arthur Stokes said: I live at 13, Fenchurch Street, and am a labourer. I help Mr. Whiting at times. I knew the deceased well. The first time I saw him on Friday was at 9.30 p.m. I was going round the rooms, and upon going into deceased's apartment I found him lying between the two beds. He was on his side asleep and snoring. I called for assistance to help him on to the bed. A man named John Thomas came and gave me the required assistance. We put him on the bed, and I did not see him again until the following morning. I had seen him drunk before, and thought he was so on this occasion. On Saturday morning, between 8 and 9, I went into deceased's room and found him dead. He was on the bed, and I at once went and told Mr. Whiting.

Harry Pope said: I live at No. 16a, Fenchurch Street, and I shared a bedroom with Gale. On Friday I saw him about one o'clock. I met him in the street. He was sitting on the window ledge of a shop. He aid to me "Hello, Popey", and I went on. He had had a little to drink, quite sufficient to let me know he was moderately "full". We have slept together for about two years. He always had been a drinker. When I got home that night it was twenty minutes to two. I struck a match and looked at him. He was on the bed with his clothes on. I had seen him once before with his clothes on at night time. Deceased stopped snoring about a quarter or half past two. I looked over my shoulder when I woke about 8.30 and found that Gale was dead.

Dr. W.P. Barrett said: I have today made a post mortem examination on deceased. I found a large clot of blood covering about one third of the left side of the brain. I also examined the organs of the body and found strong indications of heart disease and disease of the main arteries. The liver was small and very hard. I formed the opinion that the man died from what we usually term apoplexy. He had been drinking, but that was not the actual cause of death, but had accelerated death.

The jury found that deceased had died from apoplexy, accelerated by excessive drinking.
Transcribed on http://www.dover-kent.com/Bricklayers-Arms-Folkestone.html


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  • Created by: FOFC
  • Added: 28 Dec 2019
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 205780615
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/205780615/isaac-harvey-gale: accessed ), memorial page for Isaac Harvey Gale (1852–4 Jan 1902), Find a Grave Memorial ID 205780615, citing Cheriton Road Cemetery, Folkestone, Shepway District, Kent, England; Maintained by FOFC (contributor 49555002) .