Advertisement

Robert Lee Satterwhite

Advertisement

Robert Lee Satterwhite

Birth
Nevada County, Arkansas, USA
Death
29 Nov 1959 (aged 88)
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
Burial
Panhandle, Carson County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
ROBERT LEE SATTERWHITE. The proprietor and editor of a newspaper occupies a vantage ground which may make or mar a reputation, or build up or tear down a cause worthy of support or approval by the public. For this and other reasons, the city of Tulia and the county of Swisher have a reason for congratulation that the Tulia Enterprise is in such safe, sane and conservative hands. It is considered one of the best general newspapers for the family published in this section, as well as an outspoken, fair-play exponent of the best elements of the Democratic party-in fact, it is in all respects well worthy of the care and sound judgment displayed in its columns, and reflects credit on the editor and publisher, Robert Lee Satterwhite. Mr. Satterwhite was born January 28, 1871, in Nevada county, Arkansas, and is a son of James Lewis and Mary Jane (Basden) Satterwhite.

James Lewis Satterwhite was born in 1848, in Arkansas, whence his father, Dempsey Satterwhite, had come from an eastern State in that year, making his home on a farm in Washita county. James Lewis White was still a lad of tender years when the Civil war broke out, and he at once offered his services to the Confederacy and served until the close of hostilities with an Arkansas regiment. On the close of his military career, he returned to farming, and so continued in his native State until 1885, when he came to Texas. He is now living a retired life, his home being located in Freestone county. He is a Democrat, a member of the Missionary Baptist church, and a public-spirited and highly esteemed citizen. His wife, Mary Jane Basden, was also born in Arkansas, and was a daughter of Capt. W. R. Basden, who came from Alabama in 1848 and settled in a home on a farm. In 1871 he became a member of the Arkansas legislature, and was long prominent in Democratic politics in the State. Mrs. Satterwhite still survives and lives in Freestone county. She and her husband had seven sons and two daughters, and of these, Robert Lee was the second in order of birth.

The early education of Mr. Satterwhite was secured in the public schools of Arkansas and Texas, and at the age of sixteen years he began working on a farm. He then received his introduction to newspaper life when he learned the trade of printer, and four years later, in 1893, established his first paper, the Wortham Signal, at Wortham, Freestone county. This he conducted for two years and then sold out and engaged in farming, which he followed from 1893 to 1896. In the latter year he again engaged in newspaper work, establishing the Wortham Journal, and this he sold in 1898 to his brother, Edward Satterwhite, who still conducts it. In that year Robert L. Satterwhite enlisted for service in the SpanishAmerican War as a member of Company L, Second Texas Regiment, under General Oppenheim. On his return to the pursuits of peace, he located in Knox county and again engaged in farming, but in December, 1909, moved to Tulia. Here Mr. Satterwhite again entered the journalistic field as founder of the Tulia Enterprise. His efforts in behalf of the reading public have received the support which they have deserved, both in the matter of advertising and subscriptions, and he is now conducting a clean, wholesome newspaper, filled with the latest news, breezy local happenings and well-written, timely editorials. The office is fitted with all modern appliances to be found in first-class establishments, and the job department is equally well equipped, and turns out all classes of job printing in neat, attractive style.

On August 17, 1893, Mr. Satterwhite was married at Fairfield, Texas, to Miss Bessie Weaver, a native of Texas, and daughter of J. M. Weaver, an early settler of Navarro county. Four children have been born to this union: Leta, born August 20, 1894, at Wortham, Texas, and now the wife of James Sanders, a resident of Deaf Smith County; Leroy, born March 27, 1896; Gladys, born July 1, 1900; and Mary Besse, born October 4, 1908.

Mr. Satterwhite has been the architect of his own fortunes, for when he left home he was possessed of neither money nor influential friends. He feels, however, that he owes much of the credit for his success to his choice of locations, for it is his belief that this section offers greater opportunities to the man of ambition and determination than any other. He has taken an active interest in civic affairs, and has long been known as an earnest worker in the ranks of the Democratic party. While a resident of Freestone county, in 1901, Mr. Satterwhite was sent to represent his district in the State Legislature. Subsequently, in 1903, he was made assistant reading clerk of the house. He has the respect and confidence of a wide circle of friends, many of whom are fellow-members of the Missionary Baptist church.

Source:
A History of Texas and Texans
Volume 5
By Frank White Johnson, Eugene Campbell Barker, Ernest William Winkler · 1914
Contributor: Kerry Ann Szymanski # 49782268

SATTERWHITE, ROBERT LEE (1871-1959) ~ Robert Lee Satterwhite, Texas Legislator and Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives was born in Arkansas but came to Texas in 1885. He worked as a farm hand and as a printer and the later career spurred such an interest that in 1893, he owned and operated his own newspaper, the Wortham Signal. His journalism and newspaper career were shortly interupted when he enlisted in the Spanish-American War in 1898, in the 2nd Texas Regiment.
It was two years later in 1900, that Satterwhite's election to the Texas Legislature spawned a sporadic political career. Serving only one term, representing Freestone County, Satterwhite moved west and farmed until 1909, in Knox County. He then moved to Tulia in 1909, but in 1913, he established another newspaper, Tulia-Enterprise. The newspaper was a financial flop. He then moved to Panhandle, Carson County Texas and leased the Panhandle Herald on December 1, 1915. He bought the Herald on April 1, 1916, and five years later sold the paper to John L. Nunn and E.E. Manney of Amarillo, Texas. But, on July 6, 1923, the Herald was sold back to Satterwhite, who now lived in Amarillo and owned and operated the paper for three more years before finally ridding himself of the Herald on March 1, 1926, to John Nunn and David Warren.
During his time in Panhandle, Satterwhite was elected to the 36th and 37th Legislatures and while in Amarillo, he was elected to the 38th, 39th, and 40th Legislatures. It was during the 39th Legislature in 1925 that Satterwhite became Speaker of the House serving until 1927. Satterwhite then moved to Odessa where he served in his final position as a political representative in the 42nd Legislature. His political carrer lasted over thirty years and representing twenty-six counties throughout Texas.
In 1932, Satterwhite was living in Austin, where he unsuccessfully ran for the position of lieutenant governor and representative of the county in 1944 and 1946, respectively.
In 1947, Satterwhite moved once again, this time to Houston where he spent the remainder of his life. He died there on November 29, 1959, and was interred in the Panhandle Cemetery, Carson County.
***********************************************************
Sources: Presiding Officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846-2002. [Austin, Tex.]: Texas Legislative Council, 2002.
Texas Newspaper Directory (Austin: Texas Press Service, 1991). For other information regarding Mr.Satterwhite consult History of Texas and Texans, Volume V
by Frank W. Johnson; editor Eugene C. Barker
The American Historical Society, Chicago and New York, 1914
page 2164
***********************************************************
Written by: Stephanie S. Sorensen, Historian and Researcher
ROBERT LEE SATTERWHITE. The proprietor and editor of a newspaper occupies a vantage ground which may make or mar a reputation, or build up or tear down a cause worthy of support or approval by the public. For this and other reasons, the city of Tulia and the county of Swisher have a reason for congratulation that the Tulia Enterprise is in such safe, sane and conservative hands. It is considered one of the best general newspapers for the family published in this section, as well as an outspoken, fair-play exponent of the best elements of the Democratic party-in fact, it is in all respects well worthy of the care and sound judgment displayed in its columns, and reflects credit on the editor and publisher, Robert Lee Satterwhite. Mr. Satterwhite was born January 28, 1871, in Nevada county, Arkansas, and is a son of James Lewis and Mary Jane (Basden) Satterwhite.

James Lewis Satterwhite was born in 1848, in Arkansas, whence his father, Dempsey Satterwhite, had come from an eastern State in that year, making his home on a farm in Washita county. James Lewis White was still a lad of tender years when the Civil war broke out, and he at once offered his services to the Confederacy and served until the close of hostilities with an Arkansas regiment. On the close of his military career, he returned to farming, and so continued in his native State until 1885, when he came to Texas. He is now living a retired life, his home being located in Freestone county. He is a Democrat, a member of the Missionary Baptist church, and a public-spirited and highly esteemed citizen. His wife, Mary Jane Basden, was also born in Arkansas, and was a daughter of Capt. W. R. Basden, who came from Alabama in 1848 and settled in a home on a farm. In 1871 he became a member of the Arkansas legislature, and was long prominent in Democratic politics in the State. Mrs. Satterwhite still survives and lives in Freestone county. She and her husband had seven sons and two daughters, and of these, Robert Lee was the second in order of birth.

The early education of Mr. Satterwhite was secured in the public schools of Arkansas and Texas, and at the age of sixteen years he began working on a farm. He then received his introduction to newspaper life when he learned the trade of printer, and four years later, in 1893, established his first paper, the Wortham Signal, at Wortham, Freestone county. This he conducted for two years and then sold out and engaged in farming, which he followed from 1893 to 1896. In the latter year he again engaged in newspaper work, establishing the Wortham Journal, and this he sold in 1898 to his brother, Edward Satterwhite, who still conducts it. In that year Robert L. Satterwhite enlisted for service in the SpanishAmerican War as a member of Company L, Second Texas Regiment, under General Oppenheim. On his return to the pursuits of peace, he located in Knox county and again engaged in farming, but in December, 1909, moved to Tulia. Here Mr. Satterwhite again entered the journalistic field as founder of the Tulia Enterprise. His efforts in behalf of the reading public have received the support which they have deserved, both in the matter of advertising and subscriptions, and he is now conducting a clean, wholesome newspaper, filled with the latest news, breezy local happenings and well-written, timely editorials. The office is fitted with all modern appliances to be found in first-class establishments, and the job department is equally well equipped, and turns out all classes of job printing in neat, attractive style.

On August 17, 1893, Mr. Satterwhite was married at Fairfield, Texas, to Miss Bessie Weaver, a native of Texas, and daughter of J. M. Weaver, an early settler of Navarro county. Four children have been born to this union: Leta, born August 20, 1894, at Wortham, Texas, and now the wife of James Sanders, a resident of Deaf Smith County; Leroy, born March 27, 1896; Gladys, born July 1, 1900; and Mary Besse, born October 4, 1908.

Mr. Satterwhite has been the architect of his own fortunes, for when he left home he was possessed of neither money nor influential friends. He feels, however, that he owes much of the credit for his success to his choice of locations, for it is his belief that this section offers greater opportunities to the man of ambition and determination than any other. He has taken an active interest in civic affairs, and has long been known as an earnest worker in the ranks of the Democratic party. While a resident of Freestone county, in 1901, Mr. Satterwhite was sent to represent his district in the State Legislature. Subsequently, in 1903, he was made assistant reading clerk of the house. He has the respect and confidence of a wide circle of friends, many of whom are fellow-members of the Missionary Baptist church.

Source:
A History of Texas and Texans
Volume 5
By Frank White Johnson, Eugene Campbell Barker, Ernest William Winkler · 1914
Contributor: Kerry Ann Szymanski # 49782268

SATTERWHITE, ROBERT LEE (1871-1959) ~ Robert Lee Satterwhite, Texas Legislator and Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives was born in Arkansas but came to Texas in 1885. He worked as a farm hand and as a printer and the later career spurred such an interest that in 1893, he owned and operated his own newspaper, the Wortham Signal. His journalism and newspaper career were shortly interupted when he enlisted in the Spanish-American War in 1898, in the 2nd Texas Regiment.
It was two years later in 1900, that Satterwhite's election to the Texas Legislature spawned a sporadic political career. Serving only one term, representing Freestone County, Satterwhite moved west and farmed until 1909, in Knox County. He then moved to Tulia in 1909, but in 1913, he established another newspaper, Tulia-Enterprise. The newspaper was a financial flop. He then moved to Panhandle, Carson County Texas and leased the Panhandle Herald on December 1, 1915. He bought the Herald on April 1, 1916, and five years later sold the paper to John L. Nunn and E.E. Manney of Amarillo, Texas. But, on July 6, 1923, the Herald was sold back to Satterwhite, who now lived in Amarillo and owned and operated the paper for three more years before finally ridding himself of the Herald on March 1, 1926, to John Nunn and David Warren.
During his time in Panhandle, Satterwhite was elected to the 36th and 37th Legislatures and while in Amarillo, he was elected to the 38th, 39th, and 40th Legislatures. It was during the 39th Legislature in 1925 that Satterwhite became Speaker of the House serving until 1927. Satterwhite then moved to Odessa where he served in his final position as a political representative in the 42nd Legislature. His political carrer lasted over thirty years and representing twenty-six counties throughout Texas.
In 1932, Satterwhite was living in Austin, where he unsuccessfully ran for the position of lieutenant governor and representative of the county in 1944 and 1946, respectively.
In 1947, Satterwhite moved once again, this time to Houston where he spent the remainder of his life. He died there on November 29, 1959, and was interred in the Panhandle Cemetery, Carson County.
***********************************************************
Sources: Presiding Officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846-2002. [Austin, Tex.]: Texas Legislative Council, 2002.
Texas Newspaper Directory (Austin: Texas Press Service, 1991). For other information regarding Mr.Satterwhite consult History of Texas and Texans, Volume V
by Frank W. Johnson; editor Eugene C. Barker
The American Historical Society, Chicago and New York, 1914
page 2164
***********************************************************
Written by: Stephanie S. Sorensen, Historian and Researcher


Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement