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Claude Howell Champagne

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Claude Howell Champagne Veteran

Birth
Death
18 Jan 1942
At Sea
Burial
Buried or Lost at Sea. Specifically: About 60 miles east-northeast of Diamond Shoals, North Carolina. Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
Claude served as a Oiler, S.S. Allan Jackson, U.S. Merchant Marines during World War II.

He resided in New Orleans, Louisiana prior to the war.

The duties of the Oiler was to oil the bearings of the main engine and auxiliaries. He would stand watch in the engine room.

The unescorted and unarmed S.S. Allan Jackson, while enroute from Cartagena, Colombia to New York City, was hit by "two" torpedos fired by German U-boat # U-66 about 60 miles east-northeast of Diamond Shoals, North Carolina.

The first torpedo hit the starboard side forward of the bridge in the forward tank and the second hit the starboard side aft of the deckhouse between #2 and #3 tanks and broke the ship in two about 25 feet forward of the midship house. This caused both parts of the burning tanker to sink within 10 minutes with a loss of "22" of her complement of "35".

Claude was declared "Missing In Action" in this sinking during the war.

He was posthumously awarded the Mariner's Medal and the Combat Bar with a Star.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Allen Jackson has the distinction of being the first tanker to be sunk off the North Carolina Coast in an area that would become known in World War II as "Torpedo Alley". By the war's end, more than 70 boats were sunk by German U-boats in these waters.

( Bio by: Russ Pickett )
Claude served as a Oiler, S.S. Allan Jackson, U.S. Merchant Marines during World War II.

He resided in New Orleans, Louisiana prior to the war.

The duties of the Oiler was to oil the bearings of the main engine and auxiliaries. He would stand watch in the engine room.

The unescorted and unarmed S.S. Allan Jackson, while enroute from Cartagena, Colombia to New York City, was hit by "two" torpedos fired by German U-boat # U-66 about 60 miles east-northeast of Diamond Shoals, North Carolina.

The first torpedo hit the starboard side forward of the bridge in the forward tank and the second hit the starboard side aft of the deckhouse between #2 and #3 tanks and broke the ship in two about 25 feet forward of the midship house. This caused both parts of the burning tanker to sink within 10 minutes with a loss of "22" of her complement of "35".

Claude was declared "Missing In Action" in this sinking during the war.

He was posthumously awarded the Mariner's Medal and the Combat Bar with a Star.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Allen Jackson has the distinction of being the first tanker to be sunk off the North Carolina Coast in an area that would become known in World War II as "Torpedo Alley". By the war's end, more than 70 boats were sunk by German U-boats in these waters.

( Bio by: Russ Pickett )

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