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Charles Edmond Mirguet

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Charles Edmond Mirguet

Birth
Nancy, Departement de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Lorraine, France
Death
17 Feb 1929 (aged 68)
Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA
Burial
Rochester, Monroe County, New York, USA GPS-Latitude: 43.2154236, Longitude: -77.6305875
Plot
Section C Alphabet , Lot/Tier 221, Space 4N
Memorial ID
View Source
Transcribed From Rochester Times Union, February 21, 1929

C. E. MIRGUET FUNERAL WILL BE SATURDAY

Famed Rochesterian, Scientist of Smithsonian Institution, Gave All His Life to Osteology

The funeral of Charles E. Mirguet, 69, for 18 years scientist specializing in osteology for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, will be held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday from his Rochester home, 80 Selye Terrace and at 10 at the Church of Our Lady of Victory. Burial will be in Holy Sepulcher.

Mr. Mirguet is survived by the widow, Eleanor Savard Mirguet; three sons, Joseph C. of Rochester, John A. of Washington and Alban H. Mirguet of Chicago, and two daughters, Mrs. Eleanor J. McMaster and Mrs. Esther L. McMaster , both of Rochester, and 18 grandchildren.

Born in Nancy, France, Mr. Mirguet received his early education there. He was brought to this country by his aunt and uncle when he was but eight years old, and soon settled with them in Rochester.

Services Much Demanded

When but a young man he entered the employ of Ward's Natural Science Establishment and continued with that concern 35 years. With the passing of years and with additional experience he gained an enviable reputation which extended far beyond Rochester. He specialized in osteology, and his services as an expert were in demand in many scientific quarters.

Eighteen years ago he entered the government service and removed to Washington. though maintaining a home in Rochester. For his special use a one-story bungalow was built in the central quadrangle of the Smithsonian Institution where he had his quarters, and which soon became a mecca for scientists following varied lines of endeavor. Here Mr. Mirguet spent most of his waking hours for 18 years.

His activities were many and varied. He mounted bone structures of animals from many quarters of the world, the basis for study of experts in many government departments. To those who were given access to this laboratory it rapidly became one of the most interesting spots in Washington not only because of the variety of material on view, but also because of the colorful fund of information which Mr. Mirguet was able to supply.

Managed Smithsonian Displays

In every important scientific activity of the Smithsonian in the last 18 years this Rochesterian has had a share. He prepared, installed and managed Smithsonian displays at the St. Louis and San Francisco international expositions.

In previous years he had done similar work for the Ward's Natural Science Establishment at the Chicago fair in 1893 and the Pan American Exposition at Buffalo in 1901.

Unsuccessful effort had been made to preserve the famed horse on which General Sherman made his ride from Winchester to Cedar Creek. Mr. Mirguet accomplished the task and that mounted horse is one of the sights in Washington. He also mounted a 75 foot sperm whale, another object of scientific curiosity in Washington.

When the Barnum & Bailey's famed sacred white elephant became old and ugly and was killed, the hide was turned over to him for mounting and is now a museum piece.

Housed Spirit of St. Louis

Only recently when Lindbergh's plane, The Spirit of St. Louis, was turned over to the Smithsonian, he was called upon to aid in finding place for it among the other aviation relics. That was only a few weeks before he came back to Rochester last Fall on a leave of absence because of ill health.

He spent several months in Rochester and had planned to return to his post in Washington Saturday when his illness took an unexpected turn for the worse yesterday and death resulted.
Transcribed From Rochester Times Union, February 21, 1929

C. E. MIRGUET FUNERAL WILL BE SATURDAY

Famed Rochesterian, Scientist of Smithsonian Institution, Gave All His Life to Osteology

The funeral of Charles E. Mirguet, 69, for 18 years scientist specializing in osteology for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, will be held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday from his Rochester home, 80 Selye Terrace and at 10 at the Church of Our Lady of Victory. Burial will be in Holy Sepulcher.

Mr. Mirguet is survived by the widow, Eleanor Savard Mirguet; three sons, Joseph C. of Rochester, John A. of Washington and Alban H. Mirguet of Chicago, and two daughters, Mrs. Eleanor J. McMaster and Mrs. Esther L. McMaster , both of Rochester, and 18 grandchildren.

Born in Nancy, France, Mr. Mirguet received his early education there. He was brought to this country by his aunt and uncle when he was but eight years old, and soon settled with them in Rochester.

Services Much Demanded

When but a young man he entered the employ of Ward's Natural Science Establishment and continued with that concern 35 years. With the passing of years and with additional experience he gained an enviable reputation which extended far beyond Rochester. He specialized in osteology, and his services as an expert were in demand in many scientific quarters.

Eighteen years ago he entered the government service and removed to Washington. though maintaining a home in Rochester. For his special use a one-story bungalow was built in the central quadrangle of the Smithsonian Institution where he had his quarters, and which soon became a mecca for scientists following varied lines of endeavor. Here Mr. Mirguet spent most of his waking hours for 18 years.

His activities were many and varied. He mounted bone structures of animals from many quarters of the world, the basis for study of experts in many government departments. To those who were given access to this laboratory it rapidly became one of the most interesting spots in Washington not only because of the variety of material on view, but also because of the colorful fund of information which Mr. Mirguet was able to supply.

Managed Smithsonian Displays

In every important scientific activity of the Smithsonian in the last 18 years this Rochesterian has had a share. He prepared, installed and managed Smithsonian displays at the St. Louis and San Francisco international expositions.

In previous years he had done similar work for the Ward's Natural Science Establishment at the Chicago fair in 1893 and the Pan American Exposition at Buffalo in 1901.

Unsuccessful effort had been made to preserve the famed horse on which General Sherman made his ride from Winchester to Cedar Creek. Mr. Mirguet accomplished the task and that mounted horse is one of the sights in Washington. He also mounted a 75 foot sperm whale, another object of scientific curiosity in Washington.

When the Barnum & Bailey's famed sacred white elephant became old and ugly and was killed, the hide was turned over to him for mounting and is now a museum piece.

Housed Spirit of St. Louis

Only recently when Lindbergh's plane, The Spirit of St. Louis, was turned over to the Smithsonian, he was called upon to aid in finding place for it among the other aviation relics. That was only a few weeks before he came back to Rochester last Fall on a leave of absence because of ill health.

He spent several months in Rochester and had planned to return to his post in Washington Saturday when his illness took an unexpected turn for the worse yesterday and death resulted.

Gravesite Details

BurialDate:02/23/1929



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