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CPT John S. Warner

Birth
Rensselaer County, New York, USA
Death
18 Sep 1883 (aged 77–78)
Algonac, St. Clair County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Henderson, Jefferson County, New York, USA
Memorial ID
199199161 View Source

Son of William W. Warner. His mother's name is unknown.
John had four siblings:
Henry R. Warner, Alanson who drowned in 1835, Edward B. Warner & Rhoda Warner Kilby.
John S. Warner was married five known times and was the father of ten children.
There is little information but names of his first three wives from records of his children.
1st: Sallie Marius ~ mother of his sons William W. and Reuben D. Warner
2nd: Catherine Hawkins ~ mother of Sally, Mary and Catherine
3rd: Hannah 'Anna' Aspenwall ~ mother of Celinda and Alanson
4th Almeda D. Hubbard ~ mother of daughter Helen
5th: Nancy M. Whitney. ~ no children

Histories of Jefferson County, New York tell of Captain J. S. Warner and his father.
~ History of Jeffeson County, New York, Published by L. H. Everts & Company, 1878, page 383
William W. Warner from Rensselaer Co., NY moved to Henderson Harbor in March of 1813. In 1811 he was on Galloo Island but after the declation of war and the commencement of hostilities he removed to the mainland. During the season of 1813, in company with others, including Jesse Hopkins, they built a small schooner of about 40 tons called the Henderson. In October the United States impressed the schooner for their service and Captain Warner sailed it. It was lost in the fateful General Wilkinson expedition of 1813, being burned after the landing of men at Ogdensburgh, to prevent it from falling under British control. In the spring of 1814, he built a vessel of 50 tons called the Lily. It was sold in 1815. Captain Warner died at Henderson Harbor in 1817. Captain Warner's son, Capt. John S. Warner, began sailing in 1817 and did so until 1861. He then resided at the Harbor. In 1850 he purchased the Frontier House, which had been a private dwelling and in 1861 after repairs, opened it as a hotel which he operated until 1876 and then rented it to Capt. Edward White.

After the War of 1812, a considerable business was done at the Harbor in buying and shipping stock and grain which at that time went to Kingston. The first wheat ever shipped by water was taken by Capt. J. S. Warner on the schooner, Richard M. and taken to the Genesee River and from there to Rochester. Shipbuilding was carried on at Henderson Harbor for a very long time.

~ Jeffersn County Journal, Adams, New York, September 19, 1883, page 5
~ Capt John S. Warner, of Henderson, died on the morning of the 18th of September at the residence of his son, William, near Algonac, Michigan, whither he had gone in the early summer at the earnest desire of his son. Capt. Warner was the son of William Warner, one of the early settlers of Henderson, and the eldest of five children, and his death is the first in tbe family since 1835 when a brother, Alanson, was drowned. The surviving members are Henry R. of Henderson. Edward B. of Algonac, Mich., and Mrs. Austin Kilby, of Buffalo. He had always been a resident of Henderson, and in the community was known as a quiet, unobtrusive, man, a genial neighbor and a good citizen. He was the father of ten children, seven of whom survive him.
Born and brought up by the beautiful bay at Henderson it is not perhaps, surprising that he should turn to this element for livelihood and almost from boyhood his life was a sailor's life and for many years he was the careful and efficient master of different steamers on the lakes and the St. Lawrence. Meeting with few, if any, accidents, and none which could be attributed to carelessness or disregard of duty on his part he followed the water until the infirmities of age approaching he resigned his command and opened his family home at Henderson
Harbor as a hotel under the name of the "Frontier House." In this enterprise he was indifferently successful and with the loss of his wife some years ago he gave up the house and settled down to enjoy the rest which comes to the weary at evening time. May he who brought so many ships safely to port find a quiet haven " within the veil." ~ F[rank] M. Kilby, furnishing undertaker, Henderson.
The fact that the undertaker wrote his obituary seems to indicate he was in charge of the burial which would be here near several of his children and a wife.
There is no marker at his resting place.

Son of William W. Warner. His mother's name is unknown.
John had four siblings:
Henry R. Warner, Alanson who drowned in 1835, Edward B. Warner & Rhoda Warner Kilby.
John S. Warner was married five known times and was the father of ten children.
There is little information but names of his first three wives from records of his children.
1st: Sallie Marius ~ mother of his sons William W. and Reuben D. Warner
2nd: Catherine Hawkins ~ mother of Sally, Mary and Catherine
3rd: Hannah 'Anna' Aspenwall ~ mother of Celinda and Alanson
4th Almeda D. Hubbard ~ mother of daughter Helen
5th: Nancy M. Whitney. ~ no children

Histories of Jefferson County, New York tell of Captain J. S. Warner and his father.
~ History of Jeffeson County, New York, Published by L. H. Everts & Company, 1878, page 383
William W. Warner from Rensselaer Co., NY moved to Henderson Harbor in March of 1813. In 1811 he was on Galloo Island but after the declation of war and the commencement of hostilities he removed to the mainland. During the season of 1813, in company with others, including Jesse Hopkins, they built a small schooner of about 40 tons called the Henderson. In October the United States impressed the schooner for their service and Captain Warner sailed it. It was lost in the fateful General Wilkinson expedition of 1813, being burned after the landing of men at Ogdensburgh, to prevent it from falling under British control. In the spring of 1814, he built a vessel of 50 tons called the Lily. It was sold in 1815. Captain Warner died at Henderson Harbor in 1817. Captain Warner's son, Capt. John S. Warner, began sailing in 1817 and did so until 1861. He then resided at the Harbor. In 1850 he purchased the Frontier House, which had been a private dwelling and in 1861 after repairs, opened it as a hotel which he operated until 1876 and then rented it to Capt. Edward White.

After the War of 1812, a considerable business was done at the Harbor in buying and shipping stock and grain which at that time went to Kingston. The first wheat ever shipped by water was taken by Capt. J. S. Warner on the schooner, Richard M. and taken to the Genesee River and from there to Rochester. Shipbuilding was carried on at Henderson Harbor for a very long time.

~ Jeffersn County Journal, Adams, New York, September 19, 1883, page 5
~ Capt John S. Warner, of Henderson, died on the morning of the 18th of September at the residence of his son, William, near Algonac, Michigan, whither he had gone in the early summer at the earnest desire of his son. Capt. Warner was the son of William Warner, one of the early settlers of Henderson, and the eldest of five children, and his death is the first in tbe family since 1835 when a brother, Alanson, was drowned. The surviving members are Henry R. of Henderson. Edward B. of Algonac, Mich., and Mrs. Austin Kilby, of Buffalo. He had always been a resident of Henderson, and in the community was known as a quiet, unobtrusive, man, a genial neighbor and a good citizen. He was the father of ten children, seven of whom survive him.
Born and brought up by the beautiful bay at Henderson it is not perhaps, surprising that he should turn to this element for livelihood and almost from boyhood his life was a sailor's life and for many years he was the careful and efficient master of different steamers on the lakes and the St. Lawrence. Meeting with few, if any, accidents, and none which could be attributed to carelessness or disregard of duty on his part he followed the water until the infirmities of age approaching he resigned his command and opened his family home at Henderson
Harbor as a hotel under the name of the "Frontier House." In this enterprise he was indifferently successful and with the loss of his wife some years ago he gave up the house and settled down to enjoy the rest which comes to the weary at evening time. May he who brought so many ships safely to port find a quiet haven " within the veil." ~ F[rank] M. Kilby, furnishing undertaker, Henderson.
The fact that the undertaker wrote his obituary seems to indicate he was in charge of the burial which would be here near several of his children and a wife.
There is no marker at his resting place.


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  • Created by: Tracer
  • Added: 17 May 2019
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 199199161
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/199199161/john-s-warner: accessed ), memorial page for CPT John S. Warner (1805–18 Sep 1883), Find a Grave Memorial ID 199199161, citing Evergreen Cemetery, Henderson, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Maintained by Tracer (contributor 48125332).