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David James Thouless

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David James Thouless Famous memorial

Birth
Bearsden, East Dunbartonshire, Scotland
Death
6 Apr 2019 (aged 84)
Cambridge, City of Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
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Nobel Prize Laureate Scientist. He shared the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics with fellow physicists F. Duncan M. Haldane and John Michael Kosterlitz for his "theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter." After studying at Cambridge University, he received his PhD. from Cornell University in 1958. He later worked at the University of California-Berkeley and Cambridge University and in 1965, became a professor at the University of Birmingham in England. He remained there until 1978 when he went to Yale University for a brief stay. In 1980, he moved to Seattle, Washington to work at the University of Washington. His tenure there lasted until 2014 when he moved back to England. While at the University of Birmingham, he, along with Michael Kosterlitz, identified a completely new type of phase transition that can occur in 2D materials, where topological properties play a crucial role. As a result of their work, they were able to show that superconductivity or superfluidity can occur in 2D layers, something that had not been expected prior to their work. This work later earned him a share of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Kosterlitz and F. Duncan M. Haldane. Besides the Nobel Prize, he also earned many other awards and honors for his career work. He also wrote various books and academic papers in his area of speciality.
Nobel Prize Laureate Scientist. He shared the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics with fellow physicists F. Duncan M. Haldane and John Michael Kosterlitz for his "theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter." After studying at Cambridge University, he received his PhD. from Cornell University in 1958. He later worked at the University of California-Berkeley and Cambridge University and in 1965, became a professor at the University of Birmingham in England. He remained there until 1978 when he went to Yale University for a brief stay. In 1980, he moved to Seattle, Washington to work at the University of Washington. His tenure there lasted until 2014 when he moved back to England. While at the University of Birmingham, he, along with Michael Kosterlitz, identified a completely new type of phase transition that can occur in 2D materials, where topological properties play a crucial role. As a result of their work, they were able to show that superconductivity or superfluidity can occur in 2D layers, something that had not been expected prior to their work. This work later earned him a share of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Kosterlitz and F. Duncan M. Haldane. Besides the Nobel Prize, he also earned many other awards and honors for his career work. He also wrote various books and academic papers in his area of speciality.

Bio by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye


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