Dr Paul Dudley White

Dr Paul Dudley White

Birth
Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Death 31 Oct 1973 (aged 87)
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial Harvard, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Memorial ID 19713482 View Source
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Scientist. Dr. White was a pioneering specialist on the diseases of the heart and circulatory system. He was also a founding member of the American Heart Association and the International Society of Cardiology (becoming the organization's President in 1948). Born in the Roxbury neighborhood, of Boston, Massachusetts, White became interested in cardiology after the death of his twelve year old sister from rheumatic fever. He graduated from the Roxbury Latin Grammar School in 1903, and then attended the famed Harvard Medical School, graduating from there in 1911. After graduating he took a job in the pediatrics department of the Massachusetts General Hospital and served there on the staff of Dr. R.I. Lee from 1911 to 1914. Together the two men developed the technique for measuring blood coagulation. They named this the Lee and White method. White then travelled to London, England, to study the electrocardiograph or ECG machine for a year with scientist Thomas Lewis at the University College Hospital. He then served with the Harvard Medical School beginning in 1914. During the Second World War, White served with the Harvard Unit of the British Expedititionary Forces near Bologna, Italy, and later helping to establish the American base in Bordeaux, France, in 1917. He then organized an expedition with the American Red Cross to treat an outbreak of typhus in Macedonia and the Greek Islands. For his service the Greek government awarded him a decoration. He returned to the United States in 1919, and continued his work at the Massachusetts General Hospital. At the hospital, he was instrumental in establishing a cardiac unit. He became a professopr of medicine and with his clinical abilities he established a reputation for himself and the hospital. He retired from the hospital in 1956 after 42 years of service. He also served as President of the First World Congress of Cardiology. In 1955, White became President Dwight D. Eisenhower's personal physician after he suffered a heart attack. He stayed with Eisenhower until his death in 1969. He was the author of several books including, "Heart Disease" (1931). White himself, died from a heart attack in 1973. Always a strong supporter of both exercise and fitness, and an avid cyclist himself, the 17 mile Dr. Paul White Bike path located in the Boston and Brookline area, was named for him. A United States postage stamp costing three cents was also made in his honor in 1986.




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