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 Harman Back

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Harman Back

Birth
Freudenberg, Kreis Siegen-Wittgenstein, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Death
1789 (aged 80–81)
Culpeper County, Virginia, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown. Specifically: Buried on his farm in Little Fork, Virginia
Memorial ID
195090559 View Source

THIS MEMORIAL AGREES WITH THE RECORDS AT DAR (THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION). ALL OF THE INFORMATION ON THIS MEMORIAL HAS BEEN CONCLUSIVELY PROVEN BY NUMEROUS BOARD-CERTIFIED GENEALOGISTS, AS WELL AS THE GENEALOGY EXPERTS AT DAR. PLEASE DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH THE INACCURATE & DUPLICATE MEMORIAL THAT WAS PURPOSEFULLY CREATED FOR THIS MAN, IN ORDER TO SPREAD A FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY.

A FRAUDULENT DNA PROJECT IS NOW EVEN BEING USED, TO TRY TO CONVINCE PEOPLE OF THAT FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY. IT IS SO SAD.


Harman Back "rendered material aid" for the American troops, during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), which is why he is recognized as being a "Patriot" by DAR (The Daughters of the American Revolution). Rendering material aid generally means that someone furnished supplies or munitions to the soldiers.

But, long before the war, and long before Harman Back had immigrated to America, in 1738, his name was spelled as Hermann Bach. See this memorial: Hermann Bach.

Hermann Bach (later, Harman Back) was baptized on May 13, 1708, in Freudenberg, Germany, the son of Johannes Bach and Anna Margaretha Kray. So, he was probably born, shortly before that, in early 1708. He grew up in Freudenberg as well. He married Anna Margarethe Hausmann, on January 3, 1737, in nearby Bottenberg, Germany. She was born in 1712, in Bottenberg, and her parents were Hermann Hausmann and Agnessa Loos.

Hermann (Harman) and his wife Anna had a set of twins, a boy and a girl, born on March 10, 1737, in Bottenberg, Germany: Hermann Jr. (later, Harman Jr.) and Anna Ella. These twins are the only proven and documented children of Harman Back, as confirmed by DAR.

A copy of that birth record for these twins is attached to this memorial. But their daughter Anna Ella died, sometime between the day she was born, and March 10, 1738.

Hermann (Harman) and his family lived in Freudenberg, Germany, and they belonged to The Freudenberg Church. Members of that church were very supportive of a settlement of Moravian missionaries who lived nearby. In 1737, Tillmann Hirnschal, who was from Freudenberg and had already sailed to America and then returned to Freudenberg, convinced many members of that church to sail to America, with some of the Moravian missionaries who lived nearby, and to settle in Savannah, Georgia. A larger group of Moravian missionaries were already living in Savannah; they had sailed there with Gen. James Oglethorpe, a few years before.

On March 10, 1738, Hermann (Harman), his wife Anna, and their 1-year-old son, left Freudenberg, along with fifty other people from their church. (The church records prove that he and his wife Anna had left with just one child, which proves that their daughter Anna Ella had died before then.)

The fifty-three people from the Freudenberg Church, and those Moravian missionaries, walked to the Rhine River, where they boarded some small boats. Then they went down the river, to Rotterdam, arriving there in mid-April. They soon boarded a ship that was chartered to sail to Georgia. They boarded the ship, "The Union Galley," on April 28, 1738.

Many people mistakenly believe that they boarded another ship, the "Oliver." But that is not true. The "Oliver" was chartered to sail to Pennsylvania, and it did not board passengers until June 22, 1738. (The people from Freudenberg would never have lingered in Rotterdam, for two long months, when ships were departing for America every few days.) The "Oliver" later shipwrecked, off the coast of Virginia, in January of 1739. That voyage of the "Oliver" was an interesting and compelling story, and so some people like to say that Harman and his family were onboard the "Oliver." But they definitely were not.

Between the scholarly research done by Adelaide Lisetta Fries (who was an expert on the Moravians, and who wrote a book in 1905 titled, "The Moravians in Georgia, 1738-1740"), and the historical research done by Dr. Wilhelm Guethling (who wrote a book in 1956 titled, "Freudenberg Past and Present"), it can be conclusively proven that these fifty-three people from Freudenberg sailed to America on the ship "The Union Galley." This is explained very well on a website about the ship "Oliver." (Just Google, "Harman Back, ship Oliver.") That website contains a substantial amount of accurate information about Harman Back, and his only son Harman Jr., and it shows all of the Tax Lists in Little Fork, in which Harman Jr. appeared.

The ship, "The Union Galley," landed in Savannah, on September 29, 1738. The fifty-three people from Freudenberg, including Hermann (Harman), and his wife and son, lived with the Moravian missionaries, in Savannah, for about one year.

Like most immigrants at that time, Hermann changed the spelling of his name to a more Americanized version, when he arrived in America, so that other colonists could more easily spell it and pronounce it. His new name was "Harman Back," and his son's new name was "Harman Back Jr."

However, the people from Freudenberg were not used to the hot and humid weather in Georgia; many of them became ill from yellow fever, and some of them even died from it. So, in the fall of 1739, the remaining people from Freudenberg, and the rest of the Moravians, decided to leave Savannah and walk north, up to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where some of the Moravians had gone, a few months before.

As they walked north, along the coastline, nine of the people from Freudenberg, including Harman, and his wife and son, decided to stop and settle in Virginia. They settled in the small community of Little Fork. It was located in Orange County, along the Rappahannock River. (That land later became the far northern part of Culpeper County, in 1749.) It is suspected that Harman's wife Anna died, in Little Fork, shortly after they arrived. There is no evidence anywhere, including in the Little Fork records, that Harman ever remarried, or ever had any additional children, besides Harman Jr. (And no, he never had a daughter named Mary, who married Moses Tapp!) This has also been confirmed by DAR.

In 1741, one of Harman's friends, John Huffman, died. He had immigrated with him, from Freudenberg, in 1738. Harman was one of three men who took the Inventory of Mr. Huffman's estate, and all three men signed that document, including Harman. This proves that Harman knew how to write. (A copy of that document is attached to this memorial.)

On August 27, 1748, Harman bought 100 acres of land in Little Fork from Jacob Holtzclaw and his wife Catherine (Orange County Deed Book #11, p. 85). At that time, that land was still in Orange County, Virginia. Harman and his son Harman Jr. farmed that land for many years. Around 1755, Harman Jr. got married, and so his wife then moved onto that farm, and their children were born there.

The Personal Property Tax Lists in Little Fork started in 1782. Harman was 74 years old in 1782, and so he was too old to have been listed in the Tax Lists, even if he was still alive. (Men over the age of 50 were not counted as tithables in the Tax Lists.) However, his only son Harman Jr. was listed in the Tax Lists in Little Fork, from 1782 (when he was 45 years old), through 1789 (he migrated to Kentucky, a few months later).

Harman Back died in Little Fork, probably sometime before 1782. But he definitely died, sometime before September 15, 1789. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

The reason it is suspected that Harman Back had died sometime before 1782 was because his son Harman Jr. was listed as "Harman Back" on the 1782 Personal Property Tax List, and not as "Harman Back Jr." This would indicate that his father was dead by then, and so Harman Jr. was no longer considered to be a "Jr.," among the people who lived in Little Fork. Harman Jr. was also listed as "Harman Back," and not as "Harman Back Jr.," on all of the subsequent Personal Property Tax Lists as well.

Yet, on the Land Tax Lists, in 1785, 1787, and 1789 (the only years available), Harman Jr. was listed as "Harman Back Jr.," because he obviously owned his father's 100-acre farm, which he had inherited from him.

Also, in 1783, Harman Jr. suddenly had enough money (1,600 pounds) to buy 1,000 acres of land in Kentucky. Probably the only way that he would have suddenly had that much money was if his father had had died and left him the money.

But Harman Back had definitely died, sometime before September 15, 1789, because, on that day, his only son, Harman Jr., sold the 100-acre farm that he had inherited from him (Culpeper County Deed Book "P," p. 86). The deed for that sale clearly stated that Harman Jr. had obtained that property through an inheritance. The only way that someone can inherit something is if someone else dies. (That part of the deed is attached to this FindAGrave memorial, and also to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.) In fact, the deed also referred to that 100-acre farm as being the same land that Harman Jr.'s father had bought from Jacob Holtzclaw and his wife Catherine; it even said that the land was originally in Orange County. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

Harman Jr. signed that deed with his "mark" (an "x"), proving that he could not write. (That part of the deed is also attached to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.) In contrast, his father Harman Sr. could most definitely write, as proven by his signature on the Inventory of his friend John Huffman, in 1741. This is additional proof that Harman Sr. did not sell that 100-acre farm; his son Harman Jr. sold it.

After Harman Jr. sold his 100-acre farm (which he had inherited from his father), in the fall of 1789, he, his wife, and their children (including their son Joseph, his wife, and their children) then migrated to central Kentucky. They settled on land that later became Garrard County; they lived there for the rest of their lives.

Now, some people claim that Harman Sr. migrated to Kentucky. That is simply not true. It has already been proven that Harman Sr. died in Little Fork, sometime before September 15, 1789, because that was when his only son Harman Jr. (who had inherited his farm) sold that farm. But there is another fact to consider. Back at that time, countless young men were migrating to that wild, new frontier of Kentucky, mainly because of Daniel Boone's fascinating stories. Young men made that treacherous journey through the dense wilderness, not very elderly men like Harman Sr., who would have been 81 years old in 1789. It is absurd to think that an 81-year-old man would undertake such an unnecessary and dangerous journey.

Five years after arriving in Kentucky, Harman Jr. had his will written, on December 31, 1794, and he had two of his friends witness it: Charles Spilman (born 1746), who he had known since he was a boy, in Little Fork: and William Hogan (born 1750). Some people mistakenly claim that this will was the will of Harman Sr., but it wasn't. It was definitely the will of Harman Jr. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

First of all, it has been proven that Harman Sr. had died in Little Fork, sometime before September 15, 1789, and so he never even made it to Kentucky. But let's look at a few other critical points. A very elderly man, like Harman Sr. (who would have been 86 years old, if he was still alive in 1794, and if he had somehow made that dangerous trip to Kentucky), would never have selected witnesses to his will who were over 40 years younger than he was, and even younger than his own son. Plus, Harman Sr. could write (as proven by his signature on the Inventory of his friend John Huffman, in 1741), and so he would have most certainly signed his own will with his signature as well. But the will was signed with a "mark" (an "x"). That means it was signed by someone who could not write. Harman Jr. could not write, as proven by his "mark" (an "x") on that September 15, 1789 land deed. The 1794 will was most definitely the will of Harman Jr., not Harman Sr. (A copy of that actual will is attached to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.)

It should be noted that, many years ago, some incorrect information about Harman Back was submitted to DAR, which, unfortunately, was added to DAR's database. (Back then, DAR's criteria for submitting information was nowhere near as strict as it is today.) That incorrect information claimed that Harman Back had three additional sons: John Back (1738-1794); Henry Back (1740-1809); and Joseph Back (1756-1832). But none of that was true. There was absolutely no proof to support any of it.

There are no birth records, no marriage records, no death records, no land records, no court records, no tax lists, and no census reports, for any men by the name of John Back or Henry Back, ever living in Little Fork, because no men named John Back or Henry Back ever lived in Little Fork. In addition, The Germanna Foundation, which has extensive records from Little Fork, has no information about any men named John Back or Henry Back ever living in Little Fork either. There was no evidence of any kind, anywhere, that Harman Back ever had any other children besides Harman Jr. (In fact, John Back and his brother Henry Back were members of a completely different Back family, who lived about 25 miles south of Little Fork, down near the Robinson River, in the far southern part of Culpeper County that became Madison County, in 1792.)

But there was a man named Joseph Back, who was seen in a few of the Tax Lists in Little Fork; however, he was the son of Harman Back Jr. That means that Joseph Back was Harman Back Sr.'s grandson, not his son.

Unfortunately, that incorrect information about the three additional sons for Harman Back remained in DAR's database for many years. But, in March of 2022, DAR conducted extensive research on this matter. They conclusively proved that: (1) Harman Back only had one son, which was Harman Back Jr.; (2) Neither Harman Back, or his son Harman Back Jr., had a son named John Back (1738-1794) or a son named Henry Back (1740-1809); and (3) Joseph Back (1756-1832) was a grandson of Harman Back Sr., through his only son Harman Back Jr.

In March of 2022, DAR also conducted extensive research on Henry Back (1740-1809), who was also a Patriot in DAR. They conclusively proved that: (1) Henry Back was not the father of John Back (1774-1853), who married Catherine Robertson and who lived in Kentucky; and (2) Henry Back was not the father of Henry Back (1785-1871), who married Susannah Maggard and who lived in Kentucky. DAR also stated that, although Henry Back (1740-1809) did have sons named John Back and Henry Back, they were different men. His actual son John was born in 1776, and he migrated to North Carolina in 1798; he never moved to Kentucky. And his actual son Henry was born in 1783, and he died around 1805 in Virginia; he never moved to Kentucky either. Please see the accurate FindAGrave memorial for Henry Back (1740-1809): Henry Back.

As a result of DAR's extensive research, DAR made corrections to their database, for both Harman Back and Henry Back (1740-1809). And since John Back (1774-1853), who was from Breathitt County, Kentucky and who married Catherine Robertson, and Henry Back (1785-1871), who was from Letcher County, Kentucky and who married Susannah Maggard, did not descend from either Harman Back or Henry Back (1740-1809), that means that the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky does not descend from Harman Back or Henry Back (1740-1809).

Please research the facts for yourself. Start with the DAR website. Go to DAR.org. At the top, click "Genealogy." Then scroll down and click "Ancestor Search." Then type in Harman Back's name and click "Search." You can also check Henry Back's name. Then find the website for "The ship Oliver."

It is important that the truth be known and understood, in order to truly honor this Patriot and his actual descendants, and to show him the respect that he deserves.

THIS MEMORIAL AGREES WITH THE RECORDS AT DAR (THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION). ALL OF THE INFORMATION ON THIS MEMORIAL HAS BEEN CONCLUSIVELY PROVEN BY NUMEROUS BOARD-CERTIFIED GENEALOGISTS, AS WELL AS THE GENEALOGY EXPERTS AT DAR. PLEASE DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH THE INACCURATE & DUPLICATE MEMORIAL THAT WAS PURPOSEFULLY CREATED FOR THIS MAN, IN ORDER TO SPREAD A FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY.

A FRAUDULENT DNA PROJECT IS NOW EVEN BEING USED, TO TRY TO CONVINCE PEOPLE OF THAT FRAUDULENT GENEALOGY. IT IS SO SAD.


Harman Back "rendered material aid" for the American troops, during the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783), which is why he is recognized as being a "Patriot" by DAR (The Daughters of the American Revolution). Rendering material aid generally means that someone furnished supplies or munitions to the soldiers.

But, long before the war, and long before Harman Back had immigrated to America, in 1738, his name was spelled as Hermann Bach. See this memorial: Hermann Bach.

Hermann Bach (later, Harman Back) was baptized on May 13, 1708, in Freudenberg, Germany, the son of Johannes Bach and Anna Margaretha Kray. So, he was probably born, shortly before that, in early 1708. He grew up in Freudenberg as well. He married Anna Margarethe Hausmann, on January 3, 1737, in nearby Bottenberg, Germany. She was born in 1712, in Bottenberg, and her parents were Hermann Hausmann and Agnessa Loos.

Hermann (Harman) and his wife Anna had a set of twins, a boy and a girl, born on March 10, 1737, in Bottenberg, Germany: Hermann Jr. (later, Harman Jr.) and Anna Ella. These twins are the only proven and documented children of Harman Back, as confirmed by DAR.

A copy of that birth record for these twins is attached to this memorial. But their daughter Anna Ella died, sometime between the day she was born, and March 10, 1738.

Hermann (Harman) and his family lived in Freudenberg, Germany, and they belonged to The Freudenberg Church. Members of that church were very supportive of a settlement of Moravian missionaries who lived nearby. In 1737, Tillmann Hirnschal, who was from Freudenberg and had already sailed to America and then returned to Freudenberg, convinced many members of that church to sail to America, with some of the Moravian missionaries who lived nearby, and to settle in Savannah, Georgia. A larger group of Moravian missionaries were already living in Savannah; they had sailed there with Gen. James Oglethorpe, a few years before.

On March 10, 1738, Hermann (Harman), his wife Anna, and their 1-year-old son, left Freudenberg, along with fifty other people from their church. (The church records prove that he and his wife Anna had left with just one child, which proves that their daughter Anna Ella had died before then.)

The fifty-three people from the Freudenberg Church, and those Moravian missionaries, walked to the Rhine River, where they boarded some small boats. Then they went down the river, to Rotterdam, arriving there in mid-April. They soon boarded a ship that was chartered to sail to Georgia. They boarded the ship, "The Union Galley," on April 28, 1738.

Many people mistakenly believe that they boarded another ship, the "Oliver." But that is not true. The "Oliver" was chartered to sail to Pennsylvania, and it did not board passengers until June 22, 1738. (The people from Freudenberg would never have lingered in Rotterdam, for two long months, when ships were departing for America every few days.) The "Oliver" later shipwrecked, off the coast of Virginia, in January of 1739. That voyage of the "Oliver" was an interesting and compelling story, and so some people like to say that Harman and his family were onboard the "Oliver." But they definitely were not.

Between the scholarly research done by Adelaide Lisetta Fries (who was an expert on the Moravians, and who wrote a book in 1905 titled, "The Moravians in Georgia, 1738-1740"), and the historical research done by Dr. Wilhelm Guethling (who wrote a book in 1956 titled, "Freudenberg Past and Present"), it can be conclusively proven that these fifty-three people from Freudenberg sailed to America on the ship "The Union Galley." This is explained very well on a website about the ship "Oliver." (Just Google, "Harman Back, ship Oliver.") That website contains a substantial amount of accurate information about Harman Back, and his only son Harman Jr., and it shows all of the Tax Lists in Little Fork, in which Harman Jr. appeared.

The ship, "The Union Galley," landed in Savannah, on September 29, 1738. The fifty-three people from Freudenberg, including Hermann (Harman), and his wife and son, lived with the Moravian missionaries, in Savannah, for about one year.

Like most immigrants at that time, Hermann changed the spelling of his name to a more Americanized version, when he arrived in America, so that other colonists could more easily spell it and pronounce it. His new name was "Harman Back," and his son's new name was "Harman Back Jr."

However, the people from Freudenberg were not used to the hot and humid weather in Georgia; many of them became ill from yellow fever, and some of them even died from it. So, in the fall of 1739, the remaining people from Freudenberg, and the rest of the Moravians, decided to leave Savannah and walk north, up to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where some of the Moravians had gone, a few months before.

As they walked north, along the coastline, nine of the people from Freudenberg, including Harman, and his wife and son, decided to stop and settle in Virginia. They settled in the small community of Little Fork. It was located in Orange County, along the Rappahannock River. (That land later became the far northern part of Culpeper County, in 1749.) It is suspected that Harman's wife Anna died, in Little Fork, shortly after they arrived. There is no evidence anywhere, including in the Little Fork records, that Harman ever remarried, or ever had any additional children, besides Harman Jr. (And no, he never had a daughter named Mary, who married Moses Tapp!) This has also been confirmed by DAR.

In 1741, one of Harman's friends, John Huffman, died. He had immigrated with him, from Freudenberg, in 1738. Harman was one of three men who took the Inventory of Mr. Huffman's estate, and all three men signed that document, including Harman. This proves that Harman knew how to write. (A copy of that document is attached to this memorial.)

On August 27, 1748, Harman bought 100 acres of land in Little Fork from Jacob Holtzclaw and his wife Catherine (Orange County Deed Book #11, p. 85). At that time, that land was still in Orange County, Virginia. Harman and his son Harman Jr. farmed that land for many years. Around 1755, Harman Jr. got married, and so his wife then moved onto that farm, and their children were born there.

The Personal Property Tax Lists in Little Fork started in 1782. Harman was 74 years old in 1782, and so he was too old to have been listed in the Tax Lists, even if he was still alive. (Men over the age of 50 were not counted as tithables in the Tax Lists.) However, his only son Harman Jr. was listed in the Tax Lists in Little Fork, from 1782 (when he was 45 years old), through 1789 (he migrated to Kentucky, a few months later).

Harman Back died in Little Fork, probably sometime before 1782. But he definitely died, sometime before September 15, 1789. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

The reason it is suspected that Harman Back had died sometime before 1782 was because his son Harman Jr. was listed as "Harman Back" on the 1782 Personal Property Tax List, and not as "Harman Back Jr." This would indicate that his father was dead by then, and so Harman Jr. was no longer considered to be a "Jr.," among the people who lived in Little Fork. Harman Jr. was also listed as "Harman Back," and not as "Harman Back Jr.," on all of the subsequent Personal Property Tax Lists as well.

Yet, on the Land Tax Lists, in 1785, 1787, and 1789 (the only years available), Harman Jr. was listed as "Harman Back Jr.," because he obviously owned his father's 100-acre farm, which he had inherited from him.

Also, in 1783, Harman Jr. suddenly had enough money (1,600 pounds) to buy 1,000 acres of land in Kentucky. Probably the only way that he would have suddenly had that much money was if his father had had died and left him the money.

But Harman Back had definitely died, sometime before September 15, 1789, because, on that day, his only son, Harman Jr., sold the 100-acre farm that he had inherited from him (Culpeper County Deed Book "P," p. 86). The deed for that sale clearly stated that Harman Jr. had obtained that property through an inheritance. The only way that someone can inherit something is if someone else dies. (That part of the deed is attached to this FindAGrave memorial, and also to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.) In fact, the deed also referred to that 100-acre farm as being the same land that Harman Jr.'s father had bought from Jacob Holtzclaw and his wife Catherine; it even said that the land was originally in Orange County. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

Harman Jr. signed that deed with his "mark" (an "x"), proving that he could not write. (That part of the deed is also attached to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.) In contrast, his father Harman Sr. could most definitely write, as proven by his signature on the Inventory of his friend John Huffman, in 1741. This is additional proof that Harman Sr. did not sell that 100-acre farm; his son Harman Jr. sold it.

After Harman Jr. sold his 100-acre farm (which he had inherited from his father), in the fall of 1789, he, his wife, and their children (including their son Joseph, his wife, and their children) then migrated to central Kentucky. They settled on land that later became Garrard County; they lived there for the rest of their lives.

Now, some people claim that Harman Sr. migrated to Kentucky. That is simply not true. It has already been proven that Harman Sr. died in Little Fork, sometime before September 15, 1789, because that was when his only son Harman Jr. (who had inherited his farm) sold that farm. But there is another fact to consider. Back at that time, countless young men were migrating to that wild, new frontier of Kentucky, mainly because of Daniel Boone's fascinating stories. Young men made that treacherous journey through the dense wilderness, not very elderly men like Harman Sr., who would have been 81 years old in 1789. It is absurd to think that an 81-year-old man would undertake such an unnecessary and dangerous journey.

Five years after arriving in Kentucky, Harman Jr. had his will written, on December 31, 1794, and he had two of his friends witness it: Charles Spilman (born 1746), who he had known since he was a boy, in Little Fork: and William Hogan (born 1750). Some people mistakenly claim that this will was the will of Harman Sr., but it wasn't. It was definitely the will of Harman Jr. This has also been confirmed by DAR.

First of all, it has been proven that Harman Sr. had died in Little Fork, sometime before September 15, 1789, and so he never even made it to Kentucky. But let's look at a few other critical points. A very elderly man, like Harman Sr. (who would have been 86 years old, if he was still alive in 1794, and if he had somehow made that dangerous trip to Kentucky), would never have selected witnesses to his will who were over 40 years younger than he was, and even younger than his own son. Plus, Harman Sr. could write (as proven by his signature on the Inventory of his friend John Huffman, in 1741), and so he would have most certainly signed his own will with his signature as well. But the will was signed with a "mark" (an "x"). That means it was signed by someone who could not write. Harman Jr. could not write, as proven by his "mark" (an "x") on that September 15, 1789 land deed. The 1794 will was most definitely the will of Harman Jr., not Harman Sr. (A copy of that actual will is attached to the FindAGrave memorial for Harman Jr.)

It should be noted that, many years ago, some incorrect information about Harman Back was submitted to DAR, which, unfortunately, was added to DAR's database. (Back then, DAR's criteria for submitting information was nowhere near as strict as it is today.) That incorrect information claimed that Harman Back had three additional sons: John Back (1738-1794); Henry Back (1740-1809); and Joseph Back (1756-1832). But none of that was true. There was absolutely no proof to support any of it.

There are no birth records, no marriage records, no death records, no land records, no court records, no tax lists, and no census reports, for any men by the name of John Back or Henry Back, ever living in Little Fork, because no men named John Back or Henry Back ever lived in Little Fork. In addition, The Germanna Foundation, which has extensive records from Little Fork, has no information about any men named John Back or Henry Back ever living in Little Fork either. There was no evidence of any kind, anywhere, that Harman Back ever had any other children besides Harman Jr. (In fact, John Back and his brother Henry Back were members of a completely different Back family, who lived about 25 miles south of Little Fork, down near the Robinson River, in the far southern part of Culpeper County that became Madison County, in 1792.)

But there was a man named Joseph Back, who was seen in a few of the Tax Lists in Little Fork; however, he was the son of Harman Back Jr. That means that Joseph Back was Harman Back Sr.'s grandson, not his son.

Unfortunately, that incorrect information about the three additional sons for Harman Back remained in DAR's database for many years. But, in March of 2022, DAR conducted extensive research on this matter. They conclusively proved that: (1) Harman Back only had one son, which was Harman Back Jr.; (2) Neither Harman Back, or his son Harman Back Jr., had a son named John Back (1738-1794) or a son named Henry Back (1740-1809); and (3) Joseph Back (1756-1832) was a grandson of Harman Back Sr., through his only son Harman Back Jr.

In March of 2022, DAR also conducted extensive research on Henry Back (1740-1809), who was also a Patriot in DAR. They conclusively proved that: (1) Henry Back was not the father of John Back (1774-1853), who married Catherine Robertson and who lived in Kentucky; and (2) Henry Back was not the father of Henry Back (1785-1871), who married Susannah Maggard and who lived in Kentucky. DAR also stated that, although Henry Back (1740-1809) did have sons named John Back and Henry Back, they were different men. His actual son John was born in 1776, and he migrated to North Carolina in 1798; he never moved to Kentucky. And his actual son Henry was born in 1783, and he died around 1805 in Virginia; he never moved to Kentucky either. Please see the accurate FindAGrave memorial for Henry Back (1740-1809): Henry Back.

As a result of DAR's extensive research, DAR made corrections to their database, for both Harman Back and Henry Back (1740-1809). And since John Back (1774-1853), who was from Breathitt County, Kentucky and who married Catherine Robertson, and Henry Back (1785-1871), who was from Letcher County, Kentucky and who married Susannah Maggard, did not descend from either Harman Back or Henry Back (1740-1809), that means that the Back (Bach) family in southeastern Kentucky does not descend from Harman Back or Henry Back (1740-1809).

Please research the facts for yourself. Start with the DAR website. Go to DAR.org. At the top, click "Genealogy." Then scroll down and click "Ancestor Search." Then type in Harman Back's name and click "Search." You can also check Henry Back's name. Then find the website for "The ship Oliver."

It is important that the truth be known and understood, in order to truly honor this Patriot and his actual descendants, and to show him the respect that he deserves.


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