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 William Jackson Faubion

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William Jackson Faubion

  • Birth 7 Feb 1847 Parrottsville, Cocke County, Tennessee, USA
  • Death 31 Jan 1929 Tarrant County, Texas, USA
  • Burial Terrell, Kaufman County, Texas, USA
  • Memorial ID 19468805

Married Mary Alice Snow on 30 Mar 1873 in Burnet Co TX.

Their children:
Charles A Faubion 1874-1962
Edna Beatrix Faubion Fox 1876-1940
Arthur A Faubion 1879-1910
Corrine Faubion abt 1880-1880
Sarah Lillian Faubion Hopper 1881-1964
Hubert Leon Faubion 1883-1954
Margaret Halcyone Faubion 1885-1968
Arle Faubion abt 1886-1888
Robert Ross Faubion 1887-?

Notes for WILLIAM JACKSON FAUBION:
From Faubion and Allied Families, page 460:

William was only fourteen when the War between the States officially began. He had reluctantly stayed at home but when he was sixteen, he set off to join the Confederate troops. He was sooncaptured by the 10th Michigan Infantry and he was taken to Knoxville then sent to Chattanooga before being transferred to Camp Morton in Indiana, where he was kept until near the end of the war. After he had given oath to support the Constitution of the U. S., he was set free to make his way home as best he could.

Soon after he returned home, he received his father's Power of attorney to act as his agent in collecting notes and monies due, and to sell the Cocke County property. He set about putting the family business and personal affairs in order so they would be ready when his father bid them start for Texas. Soon after they had arrived in Milam County, and settled on the plantation of his Uncle William, he sickened with Malaria and was seriously ill. Dr. john McSween, his mother's brother, came to see about them and took William back with him to San Antonio where he stayed until his mother and the other children moved to Bagdad in Williamson County to live on their Uncle John Faubion's place.

William became a merchant as his father had been in Tennessee. When Mary died he was left a widow with a house full of children. He devoted his entire time to them and always had time for each and every one. After they were grown he worked for years in "Aunt Sallie & Uncle Brad's store" in Spicewood. (Sarah Faubion Pangle - his sister - and her husband Bradford Pangle.) As he grew old cataracts dimmed his eyes and he became blind. The Frontier Museum in Bandera, Texas exhibits a handmade violin bearing this label: "Made by W. J. Faubion, a blind man, 82 years old, at Leander, Williamson County, Texas, many years ago. Presented by Mrs. J. B. Pangle of Corpus Christi, Texas." It has been written of him that he was "a fine Southern Gentleman - he was that, a Gentle Man."

William's sister Sarah Faubion Pangle wrote that Mary Snow was from Wichita, Kansas. The family says her parents lived on a farm near Grapevine, Tarrant County, Texas. She and Mr. Snow were members of the Church of Christ. Mary and all of the children had the measles but Mary kept getting out of bed to care for the children and died from the resulting complications.



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  • Maintained by: Jan Wukasch Pelosi
  • Originally Created by: Deb
  • Added: 21 May 2007
  • Find A Grave Memorial 19468805
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for William Jackson Faubion (7 Feb 1847–31 Jan 1929), Find A Grave Memorial no. 19468805, citing Rose Hill Cemetery, Terrell, Kaufman County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Jan Wukasch Pelosi (contributor 47041603) .