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Roxanna Terry <I>Bush</I> Strong

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Roxanna Terry Bush Strong

Birth
Sangerfield, Oneida County, New York, USA
Death
16 Sep 1883 (aged 85)
Watertown, Jefferson County, New York, USA
Burial
Watertown, Jefferson County, New York, USA Add to Map
Plot
Sect J Lot 21-23
Memorial ID
View Source
LAlD AT REST,

Death of Mrs. Judge Strong

From The Watertown Re-Union, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 1883

In the onward match of Time with his destructive scythe, we are again called upon to chronicle another one of his sorrowful achievements in announcing the death of the venerable and respected Mrs. Stephen Strong, formerly Mrs. Morris M. Woodruff, which occurred at an early hour at her late residence on Arsenal street, Sunday morning; Sept. 16th,in her 86th year. She had been confined to her bed but a few days and, passed away quietly and peacefully without a struggle.

Mrs. Roxanna T. Strong was the eldest child of Eli Bush and Roxanna Terry, and was born in Sangersfield, Oneida county,
March 19, 1798. Her father's family consisted of ten children, six of whom survive her. She came to Watertown in 1814, and became a member of the family of the late Joseph Goodale, whose wife was her aunt. Here she became acquainted with Norris, M. Woodruff, to whom she was married October 5th, 1817. As is well known, Mr. Woodruff was among the foremost, most valuable and enterprising men in promoting the development and prospeiity of Jefferson county and Watertown especially. His good works have lived after him as monuments, of his labor and success. His wife fully entered into and shared with him the labor and trials that were met and overcome in the then early frontier life. Mr. Woodruff died January 16,1857, and his memory is held in grateful rememberance by those Who survive who knew him.

They reared up to manhood and woman hood nine children, who all took, an honorable and worthy position in society and some eminence four of whom survive her. Of these, three are daughters, Mrs. Howell Cooper, Mrs. Judge Schley, formerly Mrs. Henry Keep, and Mrs. Roswell P. Flower, who have spent most of the summer with their beloved mother and have been in constant attendance at her bedside during her last illness.

She also leaves fifteen grandchildren and nineteen great grandchildren, to whom she always gave a hearty welcome and affectionate greeting that will long be remembered by them in their happy and frequent visits to grandma,where the numerous members of her family could not go too often to pay her tributes of affection and receive her kind blessing.

She never seemed to forget that she was once young, and continued through her life to enjoy youthful society, often throwing open her parlors to young people to her own and the children of others for such amusement and entertainment as they chose, that she might witness their happy enjoyments.

On the 19th of June, 1861, Mrs. Woodruff was married to Judge Stephen Strong, of Owego, Tioga county, a worthy and prominent citizen, who had represented his district in Congress at the time the late Orville Hungerford was a member of that body, after which he was called to the bench. In her early life he was a resident in this county, and was a visiting acquaintance at her house. He was a thorough gentleman of the old school, and with large acquaintance among many of the most prominent men and statesmen of the country.

He was exceedingly entertaining in conversation, relating anecdotes and incidents of his long legal, social and political life.

His devotion in contributing to her wants and pleasures won the respect of her children and continued to make the same old home attractive to all the family both his and hers. He died April 6, 1866. Again she became widowed and had to resume the sole control, except when her daughters were with her, of the hospitable old homestead where all members of her large family and connections always found ample room and provision for their entertainment and comfort,let their stay be long or short. None but these will know how much she will be missed. Then came the daily and almost hourly calls of her neighbors and friends. This was very remarkable. The reason was she was always good company for old or young. Her charities were large, but judicious and silent when she could have them so.

In religion, she professed and practiced in her daily life the doctrine of the Savior, of peace and good will to mankind and charily for all, with universal redemption in the world to come. She seemed naturally to draw to herself the respect and esteem of all with whom she came in contact.

She had those postive qualities that made it easy for her to govern her large family and household through her life, with ease and ready obedience to her expressed wishes. Her judgement dictated what was right, and her firmness secured its execution.

It is not probable that there is a person living who entertained an unkind feeling toward her. We can say but little more, for she was a true Chrisiain woman in all the relations of life, whether daughter, sister, wife, mother or neighbor. Let us firmly believe she will have a joyful resurrection and happy meeting in the world to come, of her family and friends who have gone before her.

In this connection, it might be well to recall the fact that, awakening from one of her quiet sleeps, she remarkedto her daughters what appeared to them as a prophesy or a vision that she had caught glimpses of the future behind the veil, in which she saw the members of her departed family and friends so happy, she was anxious to be with them. Thus showing to them that her mind was reaching out to immortality and beyond the things of earth.

The funeral was largely attended from her late residence yesterday, at 3 P.M., Rev. G. J. Porter officiating. The floral tributes from relatives and friends were elaborate and beautiful

*Thank you to Thelma Dickinson Moyne for finding this obituary
________

October 1817 he married Roxana T. Bush, daughter of Eli and Roxana Terry Bush, natives of CT. Roxana T. Bush was born in Oneida Co., NY.
LAlD AT REST,

Death of Mrs. Judge Strong

From The Watertown Re-Union, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 1883

In the onward match of Time with his destructive scythe, we are again called upon to chronicle another one of his sorrowful achievements in announcing the death of the venerable and respected Mrs. Stephen Strong, formerly Mrs. Morris M. Woodruff, which occurred at an early hour at her late residence on Arsenal street, Sunday morning; Sept. 16th,in her 86th year. She had been confined to her bed but a few days and, passed away quietly and peacefully without a struggle.

Mrs. Roxanna T. Strong was the eldest child of Eli Bush and Roxanna Terry, and was born in Sangersfield, Oneida county,
March 19, 1798. Her father's family consisted of ten children, six of whom survive her. She came to Watertown in 1814, and became a member of the family of the late Joseph Goodale, whose wife was her aunt. Here she became acquainted with Norris, M. Woodruff, to whom she was married October 5th, 1817. As is well known, Mr. Woodruff was among the foremost, most valuable and enterprising men in promoting the development and prospeiity of Jefferson county and Watertown especially. His good works have lived after him as monuments, of his labor and success. His wife fully entered into and shared with him the labor and trials that were met and overcome in the then early frontier life. Mr. Woodruff died January 16,1857, and his memory is held in grateful rememberance by those Who survive who knew him.

They reared up to manhood and woman hood nine children, who all took, an honorable and worthy position in society and some eminence four of whom survive her. Of these, three are daughters, Mrs. Howell Cooper, Mrs. Judge Schley, formerly Mrs. Henry Keep, and Mrs. Roswell P. Flower, who have spent most of the summer with their beloved mother and have been in constant attendance at her bedside during her last illness.

She also leaves fifteen grandchildren and nineteen great grandchildren, to whom she always gave a hearty welcome and affectionate greeting that will long be remembered by them in their happy and frequent visits to grandma,where the numerous members of her family could not go too often to pay her tributes of affection and receive her kind blessing.

She never seemed to forget that she was once young, and continued through her life to enjoy youthful society, often throwing open her parlors to young people to her own and the children of others for such amusement and entertainment as they chose, that she might witness their happy enjoyments.

On the 19th of June, 1861, Mrs. Woodruff was married to Judge Stephen Strong, of Owego, Tioga county, a worthy and prominent citizen, who had represented his district in Congress at the time the late Orville Hungerford was a member of that body, after which he was called to the bench. In her early life he was a resident in this county, and was a visiting acquaintance at her house. He was a thorough gentleman of the old school, and with large acquaintance among many of the most prominent men and statesmen of the country.

He was exceedingly entertaining in conversation, relating anecdotes and incidents of his long legal, social and political life.

His devotion in contributing to her wants and pleasures won the respect of her children and continued to make the same old home attractive to all the family both his and hers. He died April 6, 1866. Again she became widowed and had to resume the sole control, except when her daughters were with her, of the hospitable old homestead where all members of her large family and connections always found ample room and provision for their entertainment and comfort,let their stay be long or short. None but these will know how much she will be missed. Then came the daily and almost hourly calls of her neighbors and friends. This was very remarkable. The reason was she was always good company for old or young. Her charities were large, but judicious and silent when she could have them so.

In religion, she professed and practiced in her daily life the doctrine of the Savior, of peace and good will to mankind and charily for all, with universal redemption in the world to come. She seemed naturally to draw to herself the respect and esteem of all with whom she came in contact.

She had those postive qualities that made it easy for her to govern her large family and household through her life, with ease and ready obedience to her expressed wishes. Her judgement dictated what was right, and her firmness secured its execution.

It is not probable that there is a person living who entertained an unkind feeling toward her. We can say but little more, for she was a true Chrisiain woman in all the relations of life, whether daughter, sister, wife, mother or neighbor. Let us firmly believe she will have a joyful resurrection and happy meeting in the world to come, of her family and friends who have gone before her.

In this connection, it might be well to recall the fact that, awakening from one of her quiet sleeps, she remarkedto her daughters what appeared to them as a prophesy or a vision that she had caught glimpses of the future behind the veil, in which she saw the members of her departed family and friends so happy, she was anxious to be with them. Thus showing to them that her mind was reaching out to immortality and beyond the things of earth.

The funeral was largely attended from her late residence yesterday, at 3 P.M., Rev. G. J. Porter officiating. The floral tributes from relatives and friends were elaborate and beautiful

*Thank you to Thelma Dickinson Moyne for finding this obituary
________

October 1817 he married Roxana T. Bush, daughter of Eli and Roxana Terry Bush, natives of CT. Roxana T. Bush was born in Oneida Co., NY.

Inscription

Former wife of Norris M. Woodruff



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