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TSGT Benjamin Franklin Beason

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TSGT Benjamin Franklin Beason

Birth
Oklahoma, USA
Death
14 Dec 1944 (aged 24)
Palawan Province, MIMAROPA, Philippines
Burial
Lemay, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA
Plot
SECTION 85 SITE 63
Memorial ID
19035073 View Source

Palawan Massacre
During World War II, in order to prevent the rescue of prisoners of war by the advancing allies, on 14 December 1944, the Japanese herded the remaining 150 POWs at Puerto Princesa into three covered trenches which were then set on fire using barrels of gasoline. As prisoners tried to escape the flames they were shot down. Some escaped by going over a cliff that ran along one side of the trenches, but were later hunted down and killed. Only 11 men escaped the slaughter and between 133 and 141 were killed. The site of the massacre can still be visited. The massacre is the premise of the recently published book "Last Man Out: Glenn McDole, USMC, Survivor of the Palawan Massacre in World War II" by Bob Wilbanks, and the opening scenes of the 2005 Miramax movie, "The Great Raid".

Service No. (ASN): 6296955

THE CANYON NEWS
Canyon, Texas
Thursday, 6 September 1945, Page 1

Benj. F. Beason Reported Killed

Was Victim of Japs on Dec. 14, 1944 Was the Report to Mother Here

Mrs. B. F. Beason received a telegram from the War Department Saturday expressing deep regret that her son T-Sgt Benjamin F. Beason was killed in action in the Philippines December 14, 1944, while a prisoner of war of the Japanese government.

Sgt. Beason enlisted at Lubbock in November, 1939 for overseas service and after having been given seven weeks training he was shipped overseas. He was to have been returned home in March after Pearl Harbor.

The last direct word that Mrs. Beason had from her son was May 3, 1942.

Sgt. Beason was born June 16, 1920. He attended school in Panhandle entirely through his schooling.

Surviving are his mother; 3 sisters, Mrs. Dan Clinton of Clarendon, Mrs. M. O. Slack and Mrs. W. R. New of Canyon; and 2 brothers, T. J. of Memphis, Tennessee, and L. D. of Panhandle.

Mrs. Beason has lived these three years under great strain; but she never gave up hope that he would be found alive.

Palawan Massacre
During World War II, in order to prevent the rescue of prisoners of war by the advancing allies, on 14 December 1944, the Japanese herded the remaining 150 POWs at Puerto Princesa into three covered trenches which were then set on fire using barrels of gasoline. As prisoners tried to escape the flames they were shot down. Some escaped by going over a cliff that ran along one side of the trenches, but were later hunted down and killed. Only 11 men escaped the slaughter and between 133 and 141 were killed. The site of the massacre can still be visited. The massacre is the premise of the recently published book "Last Man Out: Glenn McDole, USMC, Survivor of the Palawan Massacre in World War II" by Bob Wilbanks, and the opening scenes of the 2005 Miramax movie, "The Great Raid".

Service No. (ASN): 6296955

THE CANYON NEWS
Canyon, Texas
Thursday, 6 September 1945, Page 1

Benj. F. Beason Reported Killed

Was Victim of Japs on Dec. 14, 1944 Was the Report to Mother Here

Mrs. B. F. Beason received a telegram from the War Department Saturday expressing deep regret that her son T-Sgt Benjamin F. Beason was killed in action in the Philippines December 14, 1944, while a prisoner of war of the Japanese government.

Sgt. Beason enlisted at Lubbock in November, 1939 for overseas service and after having been given seven weeks training he was shipped overseas. He was to have been returned home in March after Pearl Harbor.

The last direct word that Mrs. Beason had from her son was May 3, 1942.

Sgt. Beason was born June 16, 1920. He attended school in Panhandle entirely through his schooling.

Surviving are his mother; 3 sisters, Mrs. Dan Clinton of Clarendon, Mrs. M. O. Slack and Mrs. W. R. New of Canyon; and 2 brothers, T. J. of Memphis, Tennessee, and L. D. of Panhandle.

Mrs. Beason has lived these three years under great strain; but she never gave up hope that he would be found alive.


Inscription

TSGT, US ARMY WORLD WAR II


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