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 Lucille <I>Dudley</I> Easley

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Lucille Dudley Easley

Birth
Death
1936 (aged 65–66)
Burial
Ardmore, Carter County, Oklahoma, USA
Memorial ID
18914719 View Source

The Daily Ardmoreite
Friday, July 3, 1936
.
Mrs. John F. Easley Passed
.
Mrs. LUCILLE DUDLEY EASLEY, wife of John F. EASLEY, editor and publisher of the Daily Ardmoreite, died of a heart attack at Friday morning at the family residence, 1614 Stanley blvd. The end was peaceful and unexpected. At the home was a brother, Dr. Marion DUDLEY, who had come Thursday to observe with Mrs. Easley her birthday. He is a Lawton druggist and the only surviving member of her immediate family.
.
She was the daughter of Dr. M. J. DUDLEY, a surgeon in the 59th Georgia Regiment, and was a descendant of American Revolutionary forebears.
.
She and Mr. Easley celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary a few days ago. They were married June 1896 in the little town of Leon and came to Ardmore where they resided continuously.
.
Besides her husband, she is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Albert RISSEN, and three grandchildren, John EASLEY, Betty Maurine and Albert Jr.
.
The services will be held at the Harvey Bros. chapel Sunday afternoon, with the Christian Science church in charge.
.
Those serving as active pallbearers: I. D. Price, Sam Blackburn, Ramon Martin, D. B. Gaines, Harry Wilson and L. A. Sprekelmeyer.
.
Burial will be in Rose Hill cemetery beside her mother who died years ago.


MRS. JOHN F. EASLEY

J. H. Snyder
Daily Ardmoreite
Ardmore, Oklahoma
Citizens of Ardmore, regardless of creed or color, were saddened when the sudden death of Mrs. John Easley was announced on the morning of July 3, and genuine regret was universally expressed at the passing of one who had been so prominently identified with the civic well being of the city and community. Death came just one day after the anniversary of her birth, which occurred in Sonora, Gorden county, Georgia, a daughter of Dr. M. J. Dudley, who served as surgeon in the Confederate army and practiced his profession in that area for many years.

As a young woman she came to the southwest and as Miss Lucille Dudley, resided in Texas and in southern Indian Territory, and it was at the little inland town of Leon in Love County that she was married to John F. Easley, just a few days more than forty years before the time of her death. It was in 1896 that the Easley's moved to Ardmore where Mr. Easley became identified with the Daily Ardmoreite, of which he is now its editor and owner, and from that time until the hour of her passing she was regarded as a leader in every movement for the betterment of the city and community, and was frequently spoken of as one of the city's most useful women. It was her inspiration that suggested a women's civic organization in Ardmore. She enlisted the aid of her husband in the enterprise and the Ryonis club was the result, which is gradually spreading to more than local proportions. She was also an active member of the Ladies of the Leaf, one of the pioneer literary clubs of the state, and served as one of its presidents. Besides her club activities, her life was devoted to many deeds of charity.

Always deeply interested in the less fortunate, she made no discrimination because of race or religion, her kindly deeds were distributed to ail alike, and it was from those who were recipients of her bounty that genuine sorrow was expressed when her sudden death was announced. A devoted wife and mother, Mrs. Easley's was a quiet unassuming personality, always thoughtful of others, loyal to a fault of her friends, and devoted to an unusual degree to her home and family.

A sterling character, a generous, splendid representative of the womanhood of the great southwest, she has gone to that eternal reward which comes as the fulfillment of a life crowded with good deeds accomplished for all those she loved and served.

Mrs. Easley suffered much, yet, she bore her suffering with that Spartan fortitude that set her apart. She had sublime faith in the future, and her life was so coordinated with that faith that it intensified her trust in life beyond the grave. Although death came suddenly, yet there is little doubt but what she knew the inevitable was at hand. Her steadfast belief that death was not the end, that life was not all is exemplified in a poem by an anonymous writer she cherished and often repeated, a few lines which are appropriate here read:

Page 390

"If life were all,
Where were the recompense
For all our tears?
The troubled toil
Of all the long drawn years,
The struggle to survive,
The passing show,
Were scarce worth while
If life were all.
"Life is not all,
I do not understand the plans;
I only know that God is good,
And that his strength sustains.
I only know that God is just;
So in the starless, songless night,
I lift my heart to him and trust;
And God my spirit witness gives,
Life is not all."
Firmly she believed with the poet, that life is not all; that beyond that bank of shadows which men call death there is another life where we take up the higher, eternal tasks prepared for those who leave their earthly cares to enter straight another elysian chamber, larger than this we leave, and lovelier. The death of Mrs. Easley interrupted a beautiful home life, it severed the tie that bound relations and friends, it terminated the existence of one whose life had been devoted to service above self, it cast a pall of gloom over a community where she was so universally loved.

Besides her husband she is survived by one daughter, Maurine Easley Riesen, and three grandchildren.

That a life so devoted, a life so weighted with self sacrifice and steadfast devotion to the well being of others, will receive its just reward, a devoted husband, and innumerable friends believe, and with one accord all breathe a silent prayer that her soul today is finding that eternal peace and happiness it so richly deserves.

The Daily Ardmoreite
Friday, July 3, 1936
.
Mrs. John F. Easley Passed
.
Mrs. LUCILLE DUDLEY EASLEY, wife of John F. EASLEY, editor and publisher of the Daily Ardmoreite, died of a heart attack at Friday morning at the family residence, 1614 Stanley blvd. The end was peaceful and unexpected. At the home was a brother, Dr. Marion DUDLEY, who had come Thursday to observe with Mrs. Easley her birthday. He is a Lawton druggist and the only surviving member of her immediate family.
.
She was the daughter of Dr. M. J. DUDLEY, a surgeon in the 59th Georgia Regiment, and was a descendant of American Revolutionary forebears.
.
She and Mr. Easley celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary a few days ago. They were married June 1896 in the little town of Leon and came to Ardmore where they resided continuously.
.
Besides her husband, she is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Albert RISSEN, and three grandchildren, John EASLEY, Betty Maurine and Albert Jr.
.
The services will be held at the Harvey Bros. chapel Sunday afternoon, with the Christian Science church in charge.
.
Those serving as active pallbearers: I. D. Price, Sam Blackburn, Ramon Martin, D. B. Gaines, Harry Wilson and L. A. Sprekelmeyer.
.
Burial will be in Rose Hill cemetery beside her mother who died years ago.


MRS. JOHN F. EASLEY

J. H. Snyder
Daily Ardmoreite
Ardmore, Oklahoma
Citizens of Ardmore, regardless of creed or color, were saddened when the sudden death of Mrs. John Easley was announced on the morning of July 3, and genuine regret was universally expressed at the passing of one who had been so prominently identified with the civic well being of the city and community. Death came just one day after the anniversary of her birth, which occurred in Sonora, Gorden county, Georgia, a daughter of Dr. M. J. Dudley, who served as surgeon in the Confederate army and practiced his profession in that area for many years.

As a young woman she came to the southwest and as Miss Lucille Dudley, resided in Texas and in southern Indian Territory, and it was at the little inland town of Leon in Love County that she was married to John F. Easley, just a few days more than forty years before the time of her death. It was in 1896 that the Easley's moved to Ardmore where Mr. Easley became identified with the Daily Ardmoreite, of which he is now its editor and owner, and from that time until the hour of her passing she was regarded as a leader in every movement for the betterment of the city and community, and was frequently spoken of as one of the city's most useful women. It was her inspiration that suggested a women's civic organization in Ardmore. She enlisted the aid of her husband in the enterprise and the Ryonis club was the result, which is gradually spreading to more than local proportions. She was also an active member of the Ladies of the Leaf, one of the pioneer literary clubs of the state, and served as one of its presidents. Besides her club activities, her life was devoted to many deeds of charity.

Always deeply interested in the less fortunate, she made no discrimination because of race or religion, her kindly deeds were distributed to ail alike, and it was from those who were recipients of her bounty that genuine sorrow was expressed when her sudden death was announced. A devoted wife and mother, Mrs. Easley's was a quiet unassuming personality, always thoughtful of others, loyal to a fault of her friends, and devoted to an unusual degree to her home and family.

A sterling character, a generous, splendid representative of the womanhood of the great southwest, she has gone to that eternal reward which comes as the fulfillment of a life crowded with good deeds accomplished for all those she loved and served.

Mrs. Easley suffered much, yet, she bore her suffering with that Spartan fortitude that set her apart. She had sublime faith in the future, and her life was so coordinated with that faith that it intensified her trust in life beyond the grave. Although death came suddenly, yet there is little doubt but what she knew the inevitable was at hand. Her steadfast belief that death was not the end, that life was not all is exemplified in a poem by an anonymous writer she cherished and often repeated, a few lines which are appropriate here read:

Page 390

"If life were all,
Where were the recompense
For all our tears?
The troubled toil
Of all the long drawn years,
The struggle to survive,
The passing show,
Were scarce worth while
If life were all.
"Life is not all,
I do not understand the plans;
I only know that God is good,
And that his strength sustains.
I only know that God is just;
So in the starless, songless night,
I lift my heart to him and trust;
And God my spirit witness gives,
Life is not all."
Firmly she believed with the poet, that life is not all; that beyond that bank of shadows which men call death there is another life where we take up the higher, eternal tasks prepared for those who leave their earthly cares to enter straight another elysian chamber, larger than this we leave, and lovelier. The death of Mrs. Easley interrupted a beautiful home life, it severed the tie that bound relations and friends, it terminated the existence of one whose life had been devoted to service above self, it cast a pall of gloom over a community where she was so universally loved.

Besides her husband she is survived by one daughter, Maurine Easley Riesen, and three grandchildren.

That a life so devoted, a life so weighted with self sacrifice and steadfast devotion to the well being of others, will receive its just reward, a devoted husband, and innumerable friends believe, and with one accord all breathe a silent prayer that her soul today is finding that eternal peace and happiness it so richly deserves.


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