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Sarah Bergion <I>Clark</I> Weaver

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Sarah Bergion Clark Weaver

Birth
Marion Township, Clinton County, Ohio, USA
Death
10 Feb 1910 (aged 79)
Caribou County, Idaho, USA
Burial
Thatcher, Franklin County, Idaho, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Daughter of Samuel Clark and Rebecca Garner

Married Miles Weaver, 24 December 1848, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Miles Joseph Weaver, Zelnorah Weaver, Sarah Jane Weaver, Rebecca Weaver

Married Franklin Weaver, 8 May 1855, Bennington, Bear Lake, Idaho

Children - Josephine Octavia Ann Weaver, Helen Weaver, Samuel Henry Weaver, Riley Weaver

History - History of Sarah Bergion Clark as written by Sarah Emeline Harris.

This history is taken from the personal genealogical records of Ethel Mickelson Brough, West Valley City, Utah, April 2001.

Sarah Clark was born at Clinton, Ohio, the 27th of January 1831. She was the daughter of Samuel Clark and Rebecca Garner Clark. He was Samuel Clark Sr. and was born at Egg Harbor N.J. 18th December 1898 and is the son of Joseph Clark and Elizabeth Sooy.

Rebecca Garner was the daughter of James Garner and Mary Moon and was married to Samuel Clark on 18th of July 1827. To this union 13 children were born: Joseph, Riley Garner, Salley or Sarah, John, Mary, Elizabeth (who died in infancy) Jane, Emma (who died in infancy) Ann, Rebecca (who died in infancy) Samuel, Ellen and James.

This family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gospel in Ohio. Samuel joined eleven years earlier than did his wife Rebecca. She belonged to the Quaker religion and was satisfied in her belief until she had a dream one night and dreamed that they attended an apple peeling bee.(As neighbors would get together and peel apples and then dry them as canning had not been heard of). In the dream she thought no one could peel apples in the right way, except Samuel, so she took this to mean that his religion, was the only right one. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints immediately. They had a happy home, and Sarah together with her brothers and sisters had many a good time, as they were a very devoted family.

They would go into the woods in the autumn of the year and gather walnuts, hickory and hazel nuts and also paw paws, they would get sap from the maple trees and make maple syrup and maple sugar. (This syrup is clear like water and then you boil it down till it turns brown and then put it in bottles or cans. 50 gallons of syrup yields one gallon of maple syrup.)

Sarah would go with her father to the town of Cincinnati to shop, but the way of travel was very slow, as they drove either horses or oxen. Sarah had a very dear friend by the name of Libby Meek, whom she loved very dearly.

Now it was a very sad day when the family sold their home and most all their belongings and went with the Saints to Far West (Missouri) thence to Nauvoo, Illinois where they were living at the time that the Prophet Joseph Smith Jr. and Patriarch Hyrum Smith were assassinated.

They were living here when the Saints were driven out of the city in February and were numbered among them, but Samuel had previously prepared for this trip and had wagons and provisions and was quite well equipped, as he was a good manager.

They had buried 3 daughters. Elizabeth, Emma, who were buried in Ohio. Rebecca was buried in Nauvoo. They crossed the river on the ice, and suffered the hardships with the rest of the saints.

A son Samuel Jr. was born to them on 1st of October 1846 at Bucharean, Missouri, and at that time they had to leave and go into an unknown wilderness.

They traveled 9 miles and camped at Sugar Creek the first night. Many came with only a few provisions and those who had plenty had to share with the needy, they stayed in this camp until 1st of March 1847. Here they traveled on 165 miles and made another camp and called it Garden Grove. Some of the saints pushed on another 27 miles farther west and called this camp, Mt. Pisgah.

And 14th of June they arrived at Council Bluffs, Iowa on the banks of the Missouri river. While here, a call came to President Brigham Young to furnish 500 men to go fight with Mexico. They called this group The Mormon Batallion, and Sarah's brothers, Joseph and Riley Garner and her lover Miles Weaver and his brother Franklin, all enlisted.

Now our dear and beautiful Sarah was very sad when she saw her loved ones march away to the tune of,"The Girl I Left Behind Me." her beautiful grey eyes would always grow misty when she rehearsed the story. Now the two older boys being away, part of the responsibility fell on Sarah and John, as grandmother Rebecca had a small child in arms.

The family decided to stay over at Winter Quarters, the winter of 1847-1848, and in June 1848 they commenced their journey to Utah. In a company of over 600 wagons and nearly 2000 souls with their accompanying good and chatties.

Sarah drove a yoke of oxen all the way across the plains and her mother Rebecca rode with her. As they traveled along they would milk their cows and carry the milk in a stone jar. As the roads were rough and the motion of the wagon churned the milk into butter.

John drove another wagon, while Mary drove the loose stock. While traveling on the way they encountered a herd of buffalo which stampeded their oxen. They ran and ran and finally stopped on the brink of a deep ravine. Sarah was always excited wherever she rehearsed this episode. Grandfather Samuel walked along side of the oxen with gun in hard so as to be ready for an attack from Indians, should they decide to do just that.

When they came to the Platte river they walked their wagon boxes and floated them across. Some of the oxen and horses swam, but the people and their belongings, and some of the cattle were ferried across, on a ferry boat. This family escaped a lot of the hardships that so many saints endured. As they had adequate supplies and were well equipped with food, clothing and Samuel was a good manager and provider. As they traveled along they saw many prairie dogs and buffalo. This family traveled in the Heber C. Kimball Company.

Now the boys had returned to Salt Lake City from the Mormon Battallion and Miles and Franklin Weaver immediately set out to meet this company of saints in their last part of their journey. These Saints arrived in Salt Lake valley in September 1848.

Sarah Clark and Miles Weaver were married 24th December 1848. They lived in the old fort for a few months.

They always lived in fear of the Indians. As they were on the warpath most of the time. Miles Weaver was called as an interpreter to the Indians in war, and also as missionary undertakings. As he had mastered the language real well and also was a great friend to them all. They spent a fairly peaceful winter in the old fort.

Grandmother had the shock of her life when two young men came galloping their horses into the fort and gave the Indian war whoop, and fired their six shooters. Grandmother, thinking them to be Indians collapsed and fell to the floor. These boys were none other then Brigham Young Jr. and John Taylor. They were very much frightened when they saw the effects of their practical joke. Most of the men folks were away at this time trying to get back some of the cattle that the Indians had driven away. in March 1849.

President Brigham Young called a number of Saints to go colonize south from Salt Lake City. Which they named Provo. Among these saints were 15 Clark's and Weaver's. It was very hard going in this desolate country, with so little to do with, nothing to buy, they helped each other to build and bartered with each other.

Sarah's first child Miles Joseph was born in Provo. 7th of November 1849. I have heard Grandmother say that there was for 3 months they had no bread, no flour, just scant rations of cornmeal. They would use the bulb of sego lilly in various ways as food.

Grandmother Sarah and Miles Weaver became the parents of 4 children: Miles Joseph, Zelnora, Sarah Jane, Rebecca, Sarah Jane died from croup when 5 years of age. Miles and Sarah lived on Church Island in Great Salt Lake and milked some of the Church cows, as Miles was working for Brigham Young and caring for the church cattle. Miles married the beautiful Sarah Holmes, daughter of Jonathan Holmes.

This was a very happy family, but this happiness was not for a long duration as on the 7th of December 1854 Miles Weaver passed away. His widows were heart-broken and almost destitute and it was very hard going now with a family of 6 and no bread winner or provider.

Grandmother has rehearsed the following to me many times: as she was laying on her bed one evening she was so very depressed, she wished she could wake up in Heaven. While she was wishing these things, there entered into her room four personages, they came to her bedside. She recognized her husband and he turned to the other three and said" Peter, James, and John, then said to one of them. You will be mouth. They placed their hands on her head and administered unto her, she wanted very much to remember the words, but they spoke in an unknown language, she could not understand, but she felt the comforting spirit, and never again was she so much depressed as before. (She claimed that she was not asleep).

Now as it was hard for widows to get along. It being Mile's wish that his brother Franklin marry and support his wives and with the advice of President Young. Sarah Clark Weaver, married Franklin Weaver on the 8th of May I855. and on the 3rd of May 1856 Sarah Elizabeth Holmes Weaver married Franklin Weaver.

Franklin's first wife was Christiana Rachel Reed. Franklin now had a large family for a young man. But there was harmony in this large family as everyone loved each other. In all the 20 years my Grandmother Sarah lived in my Mother's home I have never heard her say an unkind word about any of the family or anyone else, she was a perfect lady in every respect.

Sarah's sister Ann Clark was staying with her and it was here, that she met Solomon H. Hale, who was working for the Weaver brothers, and they were married on the 9th of March 1856.

A baby daughter was born to Sarah Clark and Franklin Weaver they named her Josephine Octavia, she grew to womanhood and married Alexander Harris Jr. and they became my parents.

Sarah Clark (Weaver) and my parents are all buried at the Thacher cemetery, Thatcher, Idaho, and at Farmington, Utah.

On the 11th of November 1857, a son was born to Franklin and Sarah Holmes Weaver.

The family now moved to Cache Valley, on a place known as Church ranch, this was the 22nd of July 1859, awhile later they moved to Millville, Utah. Here they lived for many years, all in one large house. Each family had their own apartment. They were all united and all worked together. Rachel made all the men's clothing.

Sarah Clark made all the clothing for the women. She also made buckskin gloves and braided straw hats. Sarah Holmes knit all the gloves and stockings. They were not flushed with means, but by everyone doing their share, the somehow got along. The twenty one of them were all brothers and sisters. (There were no half-breeds).

Franklin's health began to fail, and he and his first wife Rachel moved to Bennington, Bear Lake (county) Idaho. Now the boys were old enough to help. It was here that she became the President of the first Relief Society organized in that community, with Margaret Morgan as 1st Counselor and Elizabeth McMurry 2nd counselor, and Mary Hymas as chorister.

While living here, her oldest son, Miles Joseph married Annie Lindsay, a sister Phileman Lindsay, they resided in Liberty for several years then with her two sons, Henry and Riley moved to Bennington. Henry filed on a ranch, out near star Valley.

While Henry was working on this ranch contracted pneumonia. He passed away on the 16th of March I89I. Henry had never married.

Now this left Sarah and Riley alone. Riley was seven years younger than Henry and Sarah's health was poor, so she came to live in my Mother's home, and Riley lived with his sister Helen.

Sarah lived with her daughter Josephine Harris until, the 18th of February 1910, when she passed peacefully away being ill but minutes, she is buried in the Thatcher Ward cemetery.

Grandmother Sarah Weaver was a perfect lady. She was calm 1and composed at all times. She never gave utterance to any words of fault finding. Her motto was: "If you can't say anything good, don't say anything at all."

About people the best advice I have ever received was from Grandmother. She reigned as a queen in our home. We all loved her very dearly, she was always thoughtful of others and was a woman of noble character. "God Bless her Memory.”

Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol 4, p. 445

Franklin and Miles were the sons of Edward and Martha [Raymer] Weaver. Their parents accepted the Gospel of the Latter-day Saint Church in Conias, Pennsylvania. The family left with other Saints for Nauvoo where Edward Weaver worked on the Nauvoo Temple. Here he became ill and died, leaving Martha with seven children. After the mob had driven the Saints from Nauvoo the family journeyed to Winter Quarters.

When the Mormon Battalion was called at Winter quarters, Franklin and Miles were among the first twenty-five to enlist. Franklin at that time was not eighteen. He could not enlist without the permission of his mother, who had no fear of his being taken because she knew he would tell the truth about his age. He told his mother he would not have to tell his age and felt he must go. True to his intuition he was not asked how old he was because of his size and appearance. Both boys served in Company "A."

On two occasions Franklin was able to save the life of his brother. Miles was older and of delicate health, therefore, could not stand hardships as well as Franklin. The Battalion was forced to march steadily all day with little rest, poor food and sometimes no water. Food consisted of raw meat without salt, and hard tack. Twice Miles fell ill and was left by the roadside. Franklin, serving as scout, was usually ahead and did not learn of his brother's plight until camp was made at night. He left immediately, tired, worn and hungry, but with a prayer in his heart that he would reach his brother alive and for the strength to get him back to camp. Both times he reached camp at sunrise with his brother on his shoulders. He secured help from an Elder who administered to Miles. Through the blessings of the Lord, strength was given to Miles to continue the journey.

It stated in a history of the Mormon Battalion, when the group reached a mountain of rock that "Even Weaver the Scout, thought they were hemmed in."

After their discharge on the coast, Franklin went to San Francisco in search of employment and while there married Rachel Reed, March 12, 1848. The next morning they started for Utah on horseback with all their possessions on one pack animal. They joined a company of Saints and came into Salt Lake Valley. Upon hearing that a company from Winter Quarters was on the way to Utah, Franklin set out to meet them, thinking that his mother would be among them; but she had passed away while the boys were serving in the Battalion and had been buried in Winter Quarters.

Miles died leaving two wives. Franklin obeyed counsel and married his brother's widows. He took his three wives and eleven children and went to Cache Valley July 22, 1859 where he located on what was known as the Church Farm. He served as Captain of the Cache Valley Militia, and was an efficient Indian and French interpreter.

His last years were spent in Idaho where he died in Bennington, Franklin County [Bennington is now in Bear Lake County. Actually Bear Lake and Franklin Counties were part of Oneida County at that time.] June 12, 1884 at the age of 56 years.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Company, Heber C. Kimball Company (1848), Age at Departure: 17
Daughter of Samuel Clark and Rebecca Garner

Married Miles Weaver, 24 December 1848, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Children - Miles Joseph Weaver, Zelnorah Weaver, Sarah Jane Weaver, Rebecca Weaver

Married Franklin Weaver, 8 May 1855, Bennington, Bear Lake, Idaho

Children - Josephine Octavia Ann Weaver, Helen Weaver, Samuel Henry Weaver, Riley Weaver

History - History of Sarah Bergion Clark as written by Sarah Emeline Harris.

This history is taken from the personal genealogical records of Ethel Mickelson Brough, West Valley City, Utah, April 2001.

Sarah Clark was born at Clinton, Ohio, the 27th of January 1831. She was the daughter of Samuel Clark and Rebecca Garner Clark. He was Samuel Clark Sr. and was born at Egg Harbor N.J. 18th December 1898 and is the son of Joseph Clark and Elizabeth Sooy.

Rebecca Garner was the daughter of James Garner and Mary Moon and was married to Samuel Clark on 18th of July 1827. To this union 13 children were born: Joseph, Riley Garner, Salley or Sarah, John, Mary, Elizabeth (who died in infancy) Jane, Emma (who died in infancy) Ann, Rebecca (who died in infancy) Samuel, Ellen and James.

This family joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gospel in Ohio. Samuel joined eleven years earlier than did his wife Rebecca. She belonged to the Quaker religion and was satisfied in her belief until she had a dream one night and dreamed that they attended an apple peeling bee.(As neighbors would get together and peel apples and then dry them as canning had not been heard of). In the dream she thought no one could peel apples in the right way, except Samuel, so she took this to mean that his religion, was the only right one. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints immediately. They had a happy home, and Sarah together with her brothers and sisters had many a good time, as they were a very devoted family.

They would go into the woods in the autumn of the year and gather walnuts, hickory and hazel nuts and also paw paws, they would get sap from the maple trees and make maple syrup and maple sugar. (This syrup is clear like water and then you boil it down till it turns brown and then put it in bottles or cans. 50 gallons of syrup yields one gallon of maple syrup.)

Sarah would go with her father to the town of Cincinnati to shop, but the way of travel was very slow, as they drove either horses or oxen. Sarah had a very dear friend by the name of Libby Meek, whom she loved very dearly.

Now it was a very sad day when the family sold their home and most all their belongings and went with the Saints to Far West (Missouri) thence to Nauvoo, Illinois where they were living at the time that the Prophet Joseph Smith Jr. and Patriarch Hyrum Smith were assassinated.

They were living here when the Saints were driven out of the city in February and were numbered among them, but Samuel had previously prepared for this trip and had wagons and provisions and was quite well equipped, as he was a good manager.

They had buried 3 daughters. Elizabeth, Emma, who were buried in Ohio. Rebecca was buried in Nauvoo. They crossed the river on the ice, and suffered the hardships with the rest of the saints.

A son Samuel Jr. was born to them on 1st of October 1846 at Bucharean, Missouri, and at that time they had to leave and go into an unknown wilderness.

They traveled 9 miles and camped at Sugar Creek the first night. Many came with only a few provisions and those who had plenty had to share with the needy, they stayed in this camp until 1st of March 1847. Here they traveled on 165 miles and made another camp and called it Garden Grove. Some of the saints pushed on another 27 miles farther west and called this camp, Mt. Pisgah.

And 14th of June they arrived at Council Bluffs, Iowa on the banks of the Missouri river. While here, a call came to President Brigham Young to furnish 500 men to go fight with Mexico. They called this group The Mormon Batallion, and Sarah's brothers, Joseph and Riley Garner and her lover Miles Weaver and his brother Franklin, all enlisted.

Now our dear and beautiful Sarah was very sad when she saw her loved ones march away to the tune of,"The Girl I Left Behind Me." her beautiful grey eyes would always grow misty when she rehearsed the story. Now the two older boys being away, part of the responsibility fell on Sarah and John, as grandmother Rebecca had a small child in arms.

The family decided to stay over at Winter Quarters, the winter of 1847-1848, and in June 1848 they commenced their journey to Utah. In a company of over 600 wagons and nearly 2000 souls with their accompanying good and chatties.

Sarah drove a yoke of oxen all the way across the plains and her mother Rebecca rode with her. As they traveled along they would milk their cows and carry the milk in a stone jar. As the roads were rough and the motion of the wagon churned the milk into butter.

John drove another wagon, while Mary drove the loose stock. While traveling on the way they encountered a herd of buffalo which stampeded their oxen. They ran and ran and finally stopped on the brink of a deep ravine. Sarah was always excited wherever she rehearsed this episode. Grandfather Samuel walked along side of the oxen with gun in hard so as to be ready for an attack from Indians, should they decide to do just that.

When they came to the Platte river they walked their wagon boxes and floated them across. Some of the oxen and horses swam, but the people and their belongings, and some of the cattle were ferried across, on a ferry boat. This family escaped a lot of the hardships that so many saints endured. As they had adequate supplies and were well equipped with food, clothing and Samuel was a good manager and provider. As they traveled along they saw many prairie dogs and buffalo. This family traveled in the Heber C. Kimball Company.

Now the boys had returned to Salt Lake City from the Mormon Battallion and Miles and Franklin Weaver immediately set out to meet this company of saints in their last part of their journey. These Saints arrived in Salt Lake valley in September 1848.

Sarah Clark and Miles Weaver were married 24th December 1848. They lived in the old fort for a few months.

They always lived in fear of the Indians. As they were on the warpath most of the time. Miles Weaver was called as an interpreter to the Indians in war, and also as missionary undertakings. As he had mastered the language real well and also was a great friend to them all. They spent a fairly peaceful winter in the old fort.

Grandmother had the shock of her life when two young men came galloping their horses into the fort and gave the Indian war whoop, and fired their six shooters. Grandmother, thinking them to be Indians collapsed and fell to the floor. These boys were none other then Brigham Young Jr. and John Taylor. They were very much frightened when they saw the effects of their practical joke. Most of the men folks were away at this time trying to get back some of the cattle that the Indians had driven away. in March 1849.

President Brigham Young called a number of Saints to go colonize south from Salt Lake City. Which they named Provo. Among these saints were 15 Clark's and Weaver's. It was very hard going in this desolate country, with so little to do with, nothing to buy, they helped each other to build and bartered with each other.

Sarah's first child Miles Joseph was born in Provo. 7th of November 1849. I have heard Grandmother say that there was for 3 months they had no bread, no flour, just scant rations of cornmeal. They would use the bulb of sego lilly in various ways as food.

Grandmother Sarah and Miles Weaver became the parents of 4 children: Miles Joseph, Zelnora, Sarah Jane, Rebecca, Sarah Jane died from croup when 5 years of age. Miles and Sarah lived on Church Island in Great Salt Lake and milked some of the Church cows, as Miles was working for Brigham Young and caring for the church cattle. Miles married the beautiful Sarah Holmes, daughter of Jonathan Holmes.

This was a very happy family, but this happiness was not for a long duration as on the 7th of December 1854 Miles Weaver passed away. His widows were heart-broken and almost destitute and it was very hard going now with a family of 6 and no bread winner or provider.

Grandmother has rehearsed the following to me many times: as she was laying on her bed one evening she was so very depressed, she wished she could wake up in Heaven. While she was wishing these things, there entered into her room four personages, they came to her bedside. She recognized her husband and he turned to the other three and said" Peter, James, and John, then said to one of them. You will be mouth. They placed their hands on her head and administered unto her, she wanted very much to remember the words, but they spoke in an unknown language, she could not understand, but she felt the comforting spirit, and never again was she so much depressed as before. (She claimed that she was not asleep).

Now as it was hard for widows to get along. It being Mile's wish that his brother Franklin marry and support his wives and with the advice of President Young. Sarah Clark Weaver, married Franklin Weaver on the 8th of May I855. and on the 3rd of May 1856 Sarah Elizabeth Holmes Weaver married Franklin Weaver.

Franklin's first wife was Christiana Rachel Reed. Franklin now had a large family for a young man. But there was harmony in this large family as everyone loved each other. In all the 20 years my Grandmother Sarah lived in my Mother's home I have never heard her say an unkind word about any of the family or anyone else, she was a perfect lady in every respect.

Sarah's sister Ann Clark was staying with her and it was here, that she met Solomon H. Hale, who was working for the Weaver brothers, and they were married on the 9th of March 1856.

A baby daughter was born to Sarah Clark and Franklin Weaver they named her Josephine Octavia, she grew to womanhood and married Alexander Harris Jr. and they became my parents.

Sarah Clark (Weaver) and my parents are all buried at the Thacher cemetery, Thatcher, Idaho, and at Farmington, Utah.

On the 11th of November 1857, a son was born to Franklin and Sarah Holmes Weaver.

The family now moved to Cache Valley, on a place known as Church ranch, this was the 22nd of July 1859, awhile later they moved to Millville, Utah. Here they lived for many years, all in one large house. Each family had their own apartment. They were all united and all worked together. Rachel made all the men's clothing.

Sarah Clark made all the clothing for the women. She also made buckskin gloves and braided straw hats. Sarah Holmes knit all the gloves and stockings. They were not flushed with means, but by everyone doing their share, the somehow got along. The twenty one of them were all brothers and sisters. (There were no half-breeds).

Franklin's health began to fail, and he and his first wife Rachel moved to Bennington, Bear Lake (county) Idaho. Now the boys were old enough to help. It was here that she became the President of the first Relief Society organized in that community, with Margaret Morgan as 1st Counselor and Elizabeth McMurry 2nd counselor, and Mary Hymas as chorister.

While living here, her oldest son, Miles Joseph married Annie Lindsay, a sister Phileman Lindsay, they resided in Liberty for several years then with her two sons, Henry and Riley moved to Bennington. Henry filed on a ranch, out near star Valley.

While Henry was working on this ranch contracted pneumonia. He passed away on the 16th of March I89I. Henry had never married.

Now this left Sarah and Riley alone. Riley was seven years younger than Henry and Sarah's health was poor, so she came to live in my Mother's home, and Riley lived with his sister Helen.

Sarah lived with her daughter Josephine Harris until, the 18th of February 1910, when she passed peacefully away being ill but minutes, she is buried in the Thatcher Ward cemetery.

Grandmother Sarah Weaver was a perfect lady. She was calm 1and composed at all times. She never gave utterance to any words of fault finding. Her motto was: "If you can't say anything good, don't say anything at all."

About people the best advice I have ever received was from Grandmother. She reigned as a queen in our home. We all loved her very dearly, she was always thoughtful of others and was a woman of noble character. "God Bless her Memory.”

Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol 4, p. 445

Franklin and Miles were the sons of Edward and Martha [Raymer] Weaver. Their parents accepted the Gospel of the Latter-day Saint Church in Conias, Pennsylvania. The family left with other Saints for Nauvoo where Edward Weaver worked on the Nauvoo Temple. Here he became ill and died, leaving Martha with seven children. After the mob had driven the Saints from Nauvoo the family journeyed to Winter Quarters.

When the Mormon Battalion was called at Winter quarters, Franklin and Miles were among the first twenty-five to enlist. Franklin at that time was not eighteen. He could not enlist without the permission of his mother, who had no fear of his being taken because she knew he would tell the truth about his age. He told his mother he would not have to tell his age and felt he must go. True to his intuition he was not asked how old he was because of his size and appearance. Both boys served in Company "A."

On two occasions Franklin was able to save the life of his brother. Miles was older and of delicate health, therefore, could not stand hardships as well as Franklin. The Battalion was forced to march steadily all day with little rest, poor food and sometimes no water. Food consisted of raw meat without salt, and hard tack. Twice Miles fell ill and was left by the roadside. Franklin, serving as scout, was usually ahead and did not learn of his brother's plight until camp was made at night. He left immediately, tired, worn and hungry, but with a prayer in his heart that he would reach his brother alive and for the strength to get him back to camp. Both times he reached camp at sunrise with his brother on his shoulders. He secured help from an Elder who administered to Miles. Through the blessings of the Lord, strength was given to Miles to continue the journey.

It stated in a history of the Mormon Battalion, when the group reached a mountain of rock that "Even Weaver the Scout, thought they were hemmed in."

After their discharge on the coast, Franklin went to San Francisco in search of employment and while there married Rachel Reed, March 12, 1848. The next morning they started for Utah on horseback with all their possessions on one pack animal. They joined a company of Saints and came into Salt Lake Valley. Upon hearing that a company from Winter Quarters was on the way to Utah, Franklin set out to meet them, thinking that his mother would be among them; but she had passed away while the boys were serving in the Battalion and had been buried in Winter Quarters.

Miles died leaving two wives. Franklin obeyed counsel and married his brother's widows. He took his three wives and eleven children and went to Cache Valley July 22, 1859 where he located on what was known as the Church Farm. He served as Captain of the Cache Valley Militia, and was an efficient Indian and French interpreter.

His last years were spent in Idaho where he died in Bennington, Franklin County [Bennington is now in Bear Lake County. Actually Bear Lake and Franklin Counties were part of Oneida County at that time.] June 12, 1884 at the age of 56 years.

Mormon Pioneer Overland Company, Heber C. Kimball Company (1848), Age at Departure: 17


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