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Judge Joseph Folger Barnard

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Judge Joseph Folger Barnard

Birth
Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Death 4 May 1904 (aged 80)
Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Burial Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, USA
Plot Sect 16
Memorial ID 183192106 View Source

Lawyer and Judge
Justice of the New York Supreme Court

Rhinebeck Gazette - Jan. 9, 1904
DEATH OF JUDGE BARNARD
Judge Joseph F. Barnard died at his residence in Poughkeepsie on Wednesday at 1:30 o'clock. He was born about 80 years ago and was a graduate of Yale University of the class of 1841.
He was elected to the Supreme bench in 1863 and was again re-elected in 1871 and was re-elected in 1885. In 1893 he retired on account of age limit. Judge Barnard had the friendship of the members of the bar throughout the state and lawyers always found it pleasant to
appear before him to argue their cases. His funeral was held from his late residence on Friday, at two o'clock. The services were conducted by Rev. Robert Fulton Crary of the Church of the
Holy Comforter of Poughkeepsie. [provided by contributor bill gregory (48943708)]

(The Evening Enterprise, Pokeepsie, Duchess County, N.Y., Tuesday, May 20, 1902)
WELL KNOWN MEN OF POUGHKEEPSIE - THE BAR - JOSEPH FOLGER BARNARD
Hon. Joseph J. Barnard, the most distinguished member of the Duchess county bar, was born on a farm on the east bank of the Hudson river about two miles north of the then village of Pokeepsie in the year 1823, and he is now in the seventy-ninth year of his age. For thirty-three years, 1803 to 1899, with the exception of 1894, he was a justice of the supreme court, and for a number of years prior to 1893 he was chief justice of the second judicial district, of which Duchess County forms a part.
His father was Frederic Barnard, a native of Nantucket and descendant of one of two brothers of the name of Barnard who, in very early times received a patent from the king of England to a considerable tract of land upon the island of Nantucket. Judge Barnard’s ancestors on his father’s side were born upon that little island for many generations.
At the age of twenty Judge Barnard’s father was captain of a whaling ship and traveled many seas. He met and married Miss Margaret Allen, a native of Great Britain, and in that country two sons, William and Thomas, were born. Captain Barnard took his family to Nantucket, and after living there a number of years removed to the Hudson river, where he bought the farm on which his son Joseph was born.
It is said that he was attracted to this location partly because there was a company here engaged in sending out a fleet of whalers; but Captain Barnard engaged in no further business ventures. He lived quietly on his farm, where were born, after Joseph, four more sons - John, Robert, Frederick and George - and two daughters - Margaret and Martha. All grew to adult age except Henry. All of the children were thoroughly educated; William, Thomas, and Frederick went through Union college and John, Joseph F. and George graduated from Yale.
In 1836, Captain Barnard sold his farm and purchased of Walter Cunningham the house 47 Cannon street, where he died at the age of eighty years. The house is still occupied by his daughters, Margaret Barnard and Martha B. Jones, widow of Judge Samuel Jones. All of the brothers of Judge Barnard are now dead. William, Thomas and Henry died at Pokeepsie, and John at Santiago de Chili, where he acted for the government as a civil engineer. Frederick and Robert practised law in California and died there. George G. was a lawyer, recorder and judge in New York city, where he died.
Joseph F. prepared for college at the old Duchess County academy and graduated from Yale in 1841. He studied law with Henry Swift and was admitted to the bar in 1845. As a young man, he was slender and pale, but athletic, given to rowing, swimming and keeping out of doors a good share of the day, a habit which he has kept up throughout his life and to which is undoubtedly due his well preserved old age. This habit never interfered with his work as a lawyer, however, for he was always very regular in his living, being early at his office and doing a great amount of business promptly and expeditiously. He soon came into a large and lucrative practice and became one of the foremost men of his profession in the country.
In 1863 there was an opening for some Democratic lawyer to be elected justice of the supreme court in this district. Joseph F. Barnard was the choice of the profession and people in Duchess county. After some little struggle at Brooklyn, where the lawyers of that day, as they do now, strove to monopolize all of the judgeships of the district, he was nominated and elected for eight years at a salary of $2,500 a year. In 1871, he was re-elected for a term of fourteen years at $8,500 per year, and was again re-elected in 1885 for another term of fourteen years. For each of these two latter terms he was renominated by both political parties.
At the end of 1893, the eighth year of his last term, Judge Barnard, having reached the age of seventy years was obliged to retire from the bench because of a constitutional requirement. For the next year he was in ornate life, having an office in this city and attending to his personal affairs and a considerable professional practice. In that year (1894) the constitutional convention met and adopted an amendment authorizing the governor to designate from year to year justices whose retirement had been enforced through reaching the age limit to act as justices with power to act at special terms. Judges are eligible to such appointment during the unexpired term of their office, and Judge Barnard had five years of his term to his credit when the constitution was amended. The next year (1895) Governor Morton, restored him to the bench and renewed his appointment in 1896. Governor Black did the same thing during the next two years and Governor Roosevelt followed the example of his predecessors in 1899. On Dec. 31 of that year, Judge Barnard’s term expired and he retired, since which time Duchess county has had no representative on the supreme court bench.
During the past two years, the judge has lived in quiet retirement at his home on Academy St., dividing his time between the care of the many farms which he owns in Duchess and adjoining counties, in reading and in his daily afternoon walks for health, amusement and note of nature. In 1861, he married Miss Emily B. Hasbrouck of Kingston. They have two children, Frederick Barnard, who lives at home and practices law in this city, and a daughter, Maud, who is the wife of James Lenox Banks of New York city.
Provided by contributor: bill gregory (48943708)


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