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 George Romero

George Romero

Birth
Bronx, Bronx County, New York, USA
Death 16 Jul 2017 (aged 77)
Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Burial Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Plot Section P, plot 274
Memorial ID 181411973 · View Source
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Motion Picture Director. Considered to be the father of the modern zombie film genre, he was born in The Bronx borough of New York City. The son of a commercial artist, his interest in movies began at an early age. He enrolled at Carnegie Mellon University where he showed interest in art, theater, design, and film making. Shortly after graduation, he began producing short films and commercials including an early short for the PBS series, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. His first major break came in 1968 when he co-wrote and directed the cult classic, Night of the Living Dead. The film was revolutionary to the horror genre, completely reshaping the image of a "zombie." While previous films dealt with persons enslaved by Voodoo magic, his take was the first to imagine the beings as reanimated corpses hungering for the flesh of the living. Attempting to branch out from the zombie genre, he released 1971's There's Always Vanilla, which stands as his only romantic comedy. Other films from the period include Hungry Wives and The Crazies. The series of films proved to be commercial disappointments, forcing Romero to return to his roots. 1978 saw the release of Dawn of the Dead, a film often considered by critics to be the best of his "Dead Series." In 1982, he collaborated with famed horror author, Stephen King to direct Creepshow, a film consisting of five original stories collected from various works by King. The film was successful at the box office, becoming Warner Brother's highest grossing horror film of that year. Three years later, he released Day of the Dead, continuing his exploration of the theme of human collapse in the face of the undead apocalypse. The film helped to launch the career of famed make up artist and future director, Greg Nicotero. As the 1980's came to a close, his volume of work began to diminish. In 1987 he again collaborated with Stephen King on the sequel Creepshow 2, for which he provided the script. The 1993 film The Dark Half was his final collaboration with King. Critics received the film with mixed reviews. He delivered his fourth "Dead Series" film in 2005 with the release of Land of the Dead. The film was followed in quick succession by 2007's Diary of the Dead and 2009's Survival of the Dead. In addition to his role in the director's seat, he participated in several adaptations of his works. Serving as executive producer and screenwriter, he assisted protege Ted Savini in his 1990 remake of Night of the Living Dead. He repeated this role with the 2010 remake of The Crazies. During his latter years, he contributed to several video games, appearing alongside other horror film icons in 2010's Call of Duty: Black Ops. His body of work has shaped the entire horror genre for over four decades, inspiring countless others and giving rise to other hit media such as The Walking Dead.

Bio by: Kentucky Hill Hunter


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Kentucky Hill Hunter
  • Added: 16 Jul 2017
  • Find A Grave Memorial 181411973
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for George Romero (4 Feb 1940–16 Jul 2017), Find A Grave Memorial no. 181411973, citing Toronto Necropolis Cemetery and Crematorium, Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada ; Maintained by Find A Grave .