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 William Houston Jack

William Houston Jack

Birth
Wilkes County, Georgia, USA
Death 20 Aug 1844 (aged 38)
Brazoria County, Texas, USA
Burial Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Plot Republic Hill Section 1 Row G Plot 22
Memorial ID 18115 · View Source
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Bio from "Sketches of Western North Carolina, Historical and Biographical" by C. L. Hunter:

William H., Patrick C. and Spencer H. Jack, all young and adventurous spirits, emigrated from Alabama to Texas in 1831, and cast their lots with the little American colony which has then just beginning to establish itself. They were all three lawyers by profession, and took an active interest and part in the difficulties with Mexico, which were sure to result in open hostilities and the independence of Texas. Spencer H. Jack died young and without issue.

Patrick C. Jack played a prominent part in one of the earliest acts "rebellion" against the Mexican authorities. He, Travis and Edward, at Anahuac, smarting under the tyranny of the Mexican General, Bradburn, then commanding the post, denounced and rebelled against his usurpations and oppression. For this they were seized and imprisoned by Bradburn, and held as captive traitors until released by a company of armed Texans, who demanded their immediate surrender or a fight. Bradburn, not having a particular fondness for leaden arguments, and well knowing the message meant business, reluctantly yielded to the stern demand. But this chivalric rescue, as might be expected, was regarded by Mexico as treason, and war soon afterward followed.

After the close of the Mexican war Patrick C. Jack returned to his profession, which he pursued successfully. At the time of his death, in 1844, though still a young man, he was one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Texas. His brother, William H. Jack, also participated prominently in council, and in th field in the Revolution of Texas, and served as a private in the battle of San Jacinto, which sealed the independence of the "Lone Star" Republic. He achieved distinction in his profession as a lawyer and advocate, and served repeatedly as Representative and Senator in the Congress of the young Republic. Under President Burnet's administration he became Secretary of State. He, too, died in 1844, not having attained his fortieth year. He left a widow and three children, two of the latter being daughters. His elder daughter is the wife of Hon. W. P. Ballinger, of the city of Galveston, lately appointed to the bench of the Supreme Count of Texas, which position he declined. His second daughter (now deceased) married the Hon. Grey M. Bryan, of Galveston, who represented his district in Congress before the war, and was Speaker of the House of Representataives of Texas in 1875.



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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 27 Oct 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 18115
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for William Houston Jack (12 Apr 1806–20 Aug 1844), Find A Grave Memorial no. 18115, citing Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .