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 James Carter Arnold

James Carter Arnold

Birth
Death 5 Feb 1898 (aged 46)
Burial Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, USA
Plot Block 18 Lot 6
Memorial ID 18062 · View Source
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James C. Arnold, chief of police of the city of Dallas, was born near Wellington, Morgan county, Georgia, April 29, 1851. His parents were W. B. and Martha B. (Bostwick) Arnold, both natives of Georgia. His father was a merchant of Social Circle, Walton county, Georgia, at the commencement of the war, and enlisted in the Confederate service as private and served until the war closed, mostly on the coast of Georgia. He was a supporter of Breckenridge and Lane in the presidential race in 1860, and a strong advocate of state rights, and was for many years, a prominent member of the Baptist church. He was born August 31, 1820. Martha B., his wife, was born August 24, 1824, and died August 15, 1854, a member of the Baptist church from early childhood. There were born to these parents, seven children, three of whom died at an early age. John H., the oldest, at the commencement of the war, enlisted for six months, defending the coast of Georgia, but later joined the Fifty-third Georgia regiment and served under General Longstreet until the time of his death, December 26, 1862. William T., the second son, served in the Second Georgia regiment during the war and is still living, and has been for sixteen or eighteen years, district and county clerk of Sabine county, Texas. Emma D. Arnold, their daughter, sister of James C., the wife of M. A. Parker, is living in Atlanta, Georgia; Mr. Parker served in the Fifty-third Georgia regiment during the war under Longstreet.
James Carter Arnold, the subject of this sketch, was raised in Morgan and Walton counties, Georgia, went to school at Social Circle and old Fair Play, same state, and left his home for Carroll county, Mississippi, on the 14th of February, 1866, and there worked on a farm for P. H. Echols, W. A. Gayden and Col. J. D. McLemore, and in December, 1869, came to Texas to Dr. R. S. McLemore (a son of Col. J. D. McLemore), who owned Camp's Ferry, on Sabine river, in Upshur county, and lived with him until 1871, when McLemore sold the Ferry to A. Ferguson and W. L. Wilbrun; he was then in their employ until the fall of 1872; he then went in to partnership with E. B. Winn in supplying contractors with beef. The contractors were building the first fourteen miles of railway from Longview west. He then went from there to Fort Worth, expecting to be engaged in the same business, but the railroad suspended operations west of Dallas. He then followed the grocery business for a time, connecting himself with the firm of Connell, Arnold & co., at Fort Worth. He remained there for a short time. He closed out and came to Dallas in April, 1874, and has been a resident of Dallas ever since.
After coming to Dallas, he was engaged in different vocations, first in the meat business and then in the hide business, until November 5, 1874, when he was appointed on the police force of the city of Dallas under General W. L. Cabell, mayor, and June Peak, marshal. He served as patrolman and mounted officer until 1879, when he was appointed deputy city marshal under W. F. Morton, who was then city marshal. In June, 1881, he was appointed city marshal, vice W. F. Morton, resigned, and then an election was ordered to fill the unexpired term of W. F. Morton, at which election he was chosen, and has held the position of city marshal and chief of police ever since that time by virtue of an election and the choice of the people of Dallas up to the present time. During these periods of elections for chief of police of the city of Dallas, from 1881, up to the present time, he has had only five opponents, and at the last city Democratic convention, which was held April, 1892, he was the unanimous choice of that convention as the nominee of the Democratic party for the office, and was elected without opposition. This would have been his twenty-fourth year as a member of the police force, and during all these years of service, both as a subordinate, and an official, his acts have been for the fulfillment of the law without endangering life or limb to those violating the law, which was his sworn duty to have executed. By, and under, his jurisdiction, the police department has grown in efficiency from year to year, until now, it is regarded as being without a peer in any city of a similar size in the United States. He was ready, quick and genial in his manner, cool and clear-headed, and his wonderful success in dealing with men was due to these qualifications, together with the courage displayed by him in his official capacity in arresting many desperate criminals and violators of the law. He was a member of the following charitable and benevolent orders: Masonic, K. of P., I. O. O. F., and the Elks.
He was married in 1871, to Miss Callie Staples, daughter of David W. and M. A. Staples of Talladega, Alabama. She is an estimable Christian lady, a member of the First Baptist church, of which church, Mr. Arnold was a member for about eighteen years.
February 6, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1; p. 2, col. 1-3.


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 25 Oct 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 18062
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for James Carter Arnold (29 Apr 1851–5 Feb 1898), Find A Grave Memorial no. 18062, citing Greenwood Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .