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 Robert McAlpin “Three Legged Willie” Williamson

Robert McAlpin “Three Legged Willie” Williamson

Birth
Death 22 Dec 1859 (aged 52–53)
Burial Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
Plot Republic Hill Section 2 Row P Plot 6
Memorial ID 18032 · View Source
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Member Supreme Court Republic of Texas 1837- 1840; Served in Congress, Republic of Texas 1840 - 1845; Served in State of Texas Legislature; pre Republic newspaper editor, Hero of the Texas Revolution. A childhood illness left him crippled for life. His right leg was bent back at the knee and a wooden leg attached at the knee, which accounted for the nickname. Williamson County, Texas (established 1848) was named in his honor.
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The Galveston Weekly News, Galveston, Tex. 8-28-1860:
[Communicated]. Death of the late Judge Robt. M. Williamson, or Three Legged Willie.
Wharton, Wharton Co., Aug. 23d, 1860.
MESSRS. EDITORS: I have waited long and patiently in the vain hope that some abler head than mine would say a little--if but a few words--concerning the late Judge Robt. M. Williamson. Almost a year has rolled away since his death, and as yet all I have seen has been barely a common place obituary notice, merely stating that he was dead, giving no particulars, making no comments--until at last I feel that if no other will, it becomes my duty to say something.
I was his attending physician during his last illness, and from the fact that I stood by his death-bed--stood there alone--yes, alone--and still not quite alone--he had one faithful old servant, who rather choose to linger by the death-bed of a master whom he loved, than leave him alone with a comparative stranger--from this fact, I feel that I ought to say something, at least, of his decease.
Of the life and history of the "Old Judge," no one, who is conversant with the past history of the Lone Star State, can be ignorant; the two are inseparable. His name stands, as it should, among those of the fathers of the Republic of Texas, one of her early and great men.
But of his life I did not propose to speak. Enough that he did that for his country which entitles his name to the honor and respect of every Texian.--To be sure, he had his faults and failings, as who has not? Still they were those whose injury recoiled mostly upon himself--"he was his own worst enemy." A more generous heart, a more hospitable man, or a truer friend could not--never did exist.
His death took place, after a short illness, in the town of Wharton, on the night of the 20th November, 1859. The last few hours, his mind wandered seemingly back to the stirring times of his youth and his zenith, and he was living over again the busy scenes of other days. Such remarks as the following were continually escaping him--I give them from memory only:
"I say, sir, he must be delivered up--instantly released!
"Who says this thing?--who dare repeat it, is a dog!
"Hark! to the right boys,--quick, to the right!
"Who follows?--now come on!"
And many more exclamations, much the same, partially disconnected, and still quite intelligible. I could arouse him sufficiently to answer any questions, and then he would immediately relapse into the same state as before. he gradually grew weaker, until his voice became almost inaudible; he spoke but in whispers; and finally ceased to move his lips at all. He lay in the condition nearly half an hour, when he suddenly raised his hand and said in a clear, distinct voice: "Life--life is likened unto the sun: it arises in the east and gradually approaches the zenith in all the glory and splendor of noon-day. Such is manhood; but it surely moves on until it sinks beneath the western horizon--and such is death--death!!"
He was at this time conscious, and continued so for some minutes; but those were his last words; his lips still continued to move, at intervals; but no sounds issued from them. He gradually sank away and ceased to breathe; without a struggle his spirit took its upward flight.
The Judge's family were all from home, and his illness was so sudden and of so short duration, (only three days) that they were unable to get here before his death.
Hoping you will do the memory of the old Judge the justice to insert this in your valuable journal, I remain with the greatest regard,
Yours, GALEN, Jr.


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Front : Born in Georgia in 1806, Came to Texas in 1826, Died in Wharton Texas, December 22, 1859 His life was consecrated to his country . Erected by the State of Texas

Gravesite Details BACK: 1832, opposedmexican despot, Bradburn at Anahauc. 1835 Delegate from Bastrop to the Consultation, 1836, Major Texas Rangers, 1837-40 Judge 3rd Judicial District, member of Supreme Court, 1840-45, Served in Congress of Republic of Texas, 1846

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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 24 Oct 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 18032
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Robert McAlpin “Three Legged Willie” Williamson (1806–22 Dec 1859), Find A Grave Memorial no. 18032, citing Texas State Cemetery, Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .