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 Joseph Albert “Albert” Guay

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Joseph Albert “Albert” Guay

Birth
Quebec, Canada
Death
12 Jan 1951 (aged 33)
Montreal, Montreal Region, Quebec, Canada
Burial
Cremated, Other, Specifically: Cemetery Location Presently Unknown
Memorial ID
179551448 View Source

Joseph-Albert Guay (23 September 1917 – 12 January 1951) was a Canadian mass murderer, who on 9 September 1949, killed 23 people aboard Canadian Pacific Air Lines Flight 108 near Sault-au-Cochon, Quebec using a dynamite time bomb. Guay planted the bomb in his wife's suitcase, the intended victim, to avoid divorce, receive the life insurance money, and marry his mistress.

Guay, and his two accomplices, Généreux Ruest, and his sister , Marguerite Ruest-Pitre were convicted and sentenced to death. He was executed in 1951.

Joseph Albert Guay was the youngest of five children and extremely spoiled. As a young man, he sold watches and jewelry on commission and, when World War II broke out, he got a job at Canadian Arsenals Limited at St. Malo. There he met his wife, Rita Morel who he married in 1940. The arsenal closed in 1945 and Guay opened a jewelry and watch repair shop.

Albert and Rita fought often, particularly after the birth of their first and only child. He was jealous and possessive, his business wasn't going well, and debts were piling up. Then Guay met 17-year-old Marie-Ange Robitaille.

They began dating, Guay using the assumed name of Roger Angers, and eventually he bought her an engagement ring. When Rita found out, she confronted the pair in the Robitailles' living room. Guay took Marie-Ange to Sept-Iles where they lived together for a time but the young girl finally left him, citing his marriage as the reason.

Guay was devastated and devised a plan to get rid of his wife. With the help of Genereux Ruest, an employee with a talent for mechanical work, he designed and constructed a timed bomb. On 9 September 1949, he convinced Rita to fly to Baie-Comeau to pick up some items for the store and, at the airport, took out an additional insurance policy on his wife in the amount of $10,000. Before the Canadian Pacific Airlines DC-3 left the ground, Ruest's sister, Marguerite Pitre, air-freighted a package containing the bomb and it was placed in the forward baggage compartment.

The bomb exploded 41 miles into the trip. Nineteen passengers, among them three babies, and four crew members died, their bodies horribly mangled. Only one corpse — the remains of Rita Guay — had a recognizable face.

Pitre confessed ten days after the explosion while in the hospital recovering from a suicide attempt. Guay, Ruest, and Pitre were arrested and eventually hanged for their crimes. At the time, it was the worst mass murder in North America.




Joseph-Albert Guay (23 September 1917 – 12 January 1951) was a Canadian mass murderer, who on 9 September 1949, killed 23 people aboard Canadian Pacific Air Lines Flight 108 near Sault-au-Cochon, Quebec using a dynamite time bomb. Guay planted the bomb in his wife's suitcase, the intended victim, to avoid divorce, receive the life insurance money, and marry his mistress.

Guay, and his two accomplices, Généreux Ruest, and his sister , Marguerite Ruest-Pitre were convicted and sentenced to death. He was executed in 1951.

Joseph Albert Guay was the youngest of five children and extremely spoiled. As a young man, he sold watches and jewelry on commission and, when World War II broke out, he got a job at Canadian Arsenals Limited at St. Malo. There he met his wife, Rita Morel who he married in 1940. The arsenal closed in 1945 and Guay opened a jewelry and watch repair shop.

Albert and Rita fought often, particularly after the birth of their first and only child. He was jealous and possessive, his business wasn't going well, and debts were piling up. Then Guay met 17-year-old Marie-Ange Robitaille.

They began dating, Guay using the assumed name of Roger Angers, and eventually he bought her an engagement ring. When Rita found out, she confronted the pair in the Robitailles' living room. Guay took Marie-Ange to Sept-Iles where they lived together for a time but the young girl finally left him, citing his marriage as the reason.

Guay was devastated and devised a plan to get rid of his wife. With the help of Genereux Ruest, an employee with a talent for mechanical work, he designed and constructed a timed bomb. On 9 September 1949, he convinced Rita to fly to Baie-Comeau to pick up some items for the store and, at the airport, took out an additional insurance policy on his wife in the amount of $10,000. Before the Canadian Pacific Airlines DC-3 left the ground, Ruest's sister, Marguerite Pitre, air-freighted a package containing the bomb and it was placed in the forward baggage compartment.

The bomb exploded 41 miles into the trip. Nineteen passengers, among them three babies, and four crew members died, their bodies horribly mangled. Only one corpse — the remains of Rita Guay — had a recognizable face.

Pitre confessed ten days after the explosion while in the hospital recovering from a suicide attempt. Guay, Ruest, and Pitre were arrested and eventually hanged for their crimes. At the time, it was the worst mass murder in North America.




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