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Hiram Ashley Messenger

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Hiram Ashley Messenger Veteran

Birth
Peru, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
16 Oct 1910 (aged 77)
Campo Seco, Calaveras County, California, USA
Burial
Campo Seco, Calaveras County, California, USA GPS-Latitude: 38.2259636, Longitude: -120.8570175
Memorial ID
View Source
Civil War: Company E, 7th California Infantry

Hiram Ashley Messenger was 17 and still living on his parents' farm in 1850. He soon joined the host of young men who flooded California during the Gold Rush, settling at Campo Seco in Calaveras County, where he married Harriet L. Wilkins on March 22, 1859 (Sacramento Daily Union, Vol. 17, No. 2496, March 28, 1859). Harriet was born in New Hampshire in August 1841. Hiram and Harriet were living in Amador County in 1860 where Hiram was working as a laborer. The couple would have eight children, but only five would reach maturity: Madison C. (1862); Mary J. (1867); Maude W. (1868); Hiram H. (January 1872), and Harriet M. (June 1884).

Hiram enlisted at San Francisco November 29, 1864, and was mustered into federal service the same day at the Presidio as a captain in command of Company E, 7th California Infantry, with 1st Lieutenant William Broad serving as his Adjutant. The company was stationed at the Presidio from the date of its organization until the end of March, 1865. It then went by sea to San Pedro and Drum Barracks to join the march across the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts in the spring of 1865.

Messenger and his company arrived at Tubac, Arizona Territory, in June 1865. During one of his several scouts against the Apache he was ambushed in the Huachuca Mountains. The following remarks are found on the Fort Mason post returns for August 1865: "Captain Messenger and thirty enlisted men left Tubac, A.T., on the thirteenth day of July, for a scout in the Guachuca [sic] Mountains. On the twenty-second day of July, Captain Messenger and fifteen men were surrounded and attacked by between one and two hundred Indians. An action of about one hour ensued, when the Indians were driven off with considerable loss. Night coming on and there being a heavy rain, it was found impossible to pursue the Indians. Sergeant William D. Kelly and Private John Henry were killed, and Private Abel Roe wounded in the knee. Returned to Tubac, August 4, 1865."

Captain Messenger relocated to Fort Mason August 21 when the garrison transferred to the new post. He survived the deadly epidemic that struck the post in the fall and winter of 1865-66 and departed for Fort Yuma with his company May 12, 1866. Messenger left Fort Yuma aboard the "Oregon" on June 12 and sailed for San Francisco where he arrived June 23. He was mustered out at the Presidio of San Francisco with his company June 28. Messenger returned to his family in Calaveras County where he operated a farm and was commissioned a Captain in the "Union Guards" of the California State Militia June 8, 1867. He remained with the unit until it was disbanded later that year December 29. Messenger was active in the Democratic Party and was elected to the California State Assembly as District 17 Representative September 3, 1879, and served in the 1880-81 legislative session. Hiram Messenger filed for a Civil War veteran's pension January 11, 1892, and received application No. 1,084,181 and certificate No. 1,107,109. He was operating a boarding house in Mokelumne, Calaveras County in 1900, and his youngest daughter, Harriet, was still at home helping with the boarding house operation. He lost a subsequent bid to the assembly November 8, 1904, but was subsequently elected November 8, 1909. Hiram had moved back onto his farm at Campo Seco in 1906 and was still calling it home when he died there October 16, 1910. His wife, Harriet, filed for a widow's pension November 23, 1910, and received application No. 953,039 and certificate No. 714,883.

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Biography by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
Civil War: Company E, 7th California Infantry

Hiram Ashley Messenger was 17 and still living on his parents' farm in 1850. He soon joined the host of young men who flooded California during the Gold Rush, settling at Campo Seco in Calaveras County, where he married Harriet L. Wilkins on March 22, 1859 (Sacramento Daily Union, Vol. 17, No. 2496, March 28, 1859). Harriet was born in New Hampshire in August 1841. Hiram and Harriet were living in Amador County in 1860 where Hiram was working as a laborer. The couple would have eight children, but only five would reach maturity: Madison C. (1862); Mary J. (1867); Maude W. (1868); Hiram H. (January 1872), and Harriet M. (June 1884).

Hiram enlisted at San Francisco November 29, 1864, and was mustered into federal service the same day at the Presidio as a captain in command of Company E, 7th California Infantry, with 1st Lieutenant William Broad serving as his Adjutant. The company was stationed at the Presidio from the date of its organization until the end of March, 1865. It then went by sea to San Pedro and Drum Barracks to join the march across the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts in the spring of 1865.

Messenger and his company arrived at Tubac, Arizona Territory, in June 1865. During one of his several scouts against the Apache he was ambushed in the Huachuca Mountains. The following remarks are found on the Fort Mason post returns for August 1865: "Captain Messenger and thirty enlisted men left Tubac, A.T., on the thirteenth day of July, for a scout in the Guachuca [sic] Mountains. On the twenty-second day of July, Captain Messenger and fifteen men were surrounded and attacked by between one and two hundred Indians. An action of about one hour ensued, when the Indians were driven off with considerable loss. Night coming on and there being a heavy rain, it was found impossible to pursue the Indians. Sergeant William D. Kelly and Private John Henry were killed, and Private Abel Roe wounded in the knee. Returned to Tubac, August 4, 1865."

Captain Messenger relocated to Fort Mason August 21 when the garrison transferred to the new post. He survived the deadly epidemic that struck the post in the fall and winter of 1865-66 and departed for Fort Yuma with his company May 12, 1866. Messenger left Fort Yuma aboard the "Oregon" on June 12 and sailed for San Francisco where he arrived June 23. He was mustered out at the Presidio of San Francisco with his company June 28. Messenger returned to his family in Calaveras County where he operated a farm and was commissioned a Captain in the "Union Guards" of the California State Militia June 8, 1867. He remained with the unit until it was disbanded later that year December 29. Messenger was active in the Democratic Party and was elected to the California State Assembly as District 17 Representative September 3, 1879, and served in the 1880-81 legislative session. Hiram Messenger filed for a Civil War veteran's pension January 11, 1892, and received application No. 1,084,181 and certificate No. 1,107,109. He was operating a boarding house in Mokelumne, Calaveras County in 1900, and his youngest daughter, Harriet, was still at home helping with the boarding house operation. He lost a subsequent bid to the assembly November 8, 1904, but was subsequently elected November 8, 1909. Hiram had moved back onto his farm at Campo Seco in 1906 and was still calling it home when he died there October 16, 1910. His wife, Harriet, filed for a widow's pension November 23, 1910, and received application No. 953,039 and certificate No. 714,883.

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Biography by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War


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