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Rev Henry Marvin Wharton

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Rev Henry Marvin Wharton

Birth
Culpeper County, Virginia, USA
Death
Jun 1928 (aged 79)
Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
Burial
Pikesville, Baltimore County, Maryland, USA GPS-Latitude: 39.3807946, Longitude: -76.7270005
Memorial ID
View Source
A fascinating man for all seasons during his time in history. He and (2) brothers, Morton and John, all became Baptist clergymen.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION and CHARACTER.
New York Times:
“Mr. Wharton is about six feet in height, a stalwart, well proportioned man, who stands as erect as a Grenadier, and has the general appearance of one able to do an immense amount of physical as well as mental work. He is a magnetic speaker, a sweet singer, and has a most engaging manner.”

New York Examiner:
“With a voice as pleasant as a harp string, a manner and spirit as genial as a May day, prolific and telling illustrations, sensitive to the needs of his audience, pathos and humor in the same sentence, Dr Wharton plays with his audience as an expert fisherman with his bass.”

[A sample of his home-spun humor after a visit to Cairo, Egypt, "The land is so fertile that where the Nile overflowed every year, one might drive a ten-penney nail in the ground at night and a crowbar might grow from it by morning," or a preacher's mixup at a funeral, "He got his words mixed up and instead of saying the people would be given the opportunity of looking at the corpse, said, 'The corpse will now have an opportunity to walk around and view the people'.]

CIVIL WAR VETERAN (CSA). Enlisted first as a dispensary clerk at age 16; later enlisted as a soldier under Gen. John Brown Gordon, a man he much admired. They were with General Lee at the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse. Wharton's book, WAR SONGS AND POEMS OF THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY was dedicated to Gen. Gordon, who he considered a friend as well as commander.

WAR MEMORIES. "Never, while memory lasts, shall I forget a scene which transpired early in April, 1861, as our family sat at breakfast in the farm house home in Culpeper County, Va. My oldest brother suddenly entered the dining room and exclaimed, "The war has commenced; Fort Sumter is being bombarded!" I was too young to understand these words, but saw, upon the faces of my father and mother, an expression which filled my heart with anxiety. Little did I know that our own beloved State was to become the battleground of the great struggle, and that our home should be left desolate, while some of the dearest members of that little circle around the breakfast table must soon be taken away forever...Our family remained in the County of Culpepper until about the middle of the war. God took our dear mother from us [1862]; the older boys had to go to war and father was alone with his daughters and myself, I being the youngest child. As I was under age and not large enough to be noticed, I was often in conversation with Federal officers, and also with those from the South. One army or the other seemed almost incessantly passing to and fro through our part of the State. It was my privilege to witness the battle of Cedar Mountain, which was fought two miles from my father's home, and the next day I rode over the field in company with him to see if we might, in any way, minister to the wants of the wounded and suffering. It was my first study of a battle field, and the impression made upon my mind, when I saw hundreds of men lying in every position, the most of them dead, others wounded and dying, can never be removed. It was a matter absolutely incomprehensible to me, that men should kill each other as they had done on the bloody field, and I wonder at it to this day...The second day of April, 1865 found me in the breastworks below Petersburg on the Appomattox River, a boy of sixteen, and a soldier in an army of 40,000 men opposing fully five times that many on the other side." [This was the Third Battle of Petersburg, occurring seven days before Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.] He later wrote, "Standing forty years away from the terrible days of the early sixties, we are able to look back now upon those times with cooler blood and calmer judgment. In all the history of the world there has not been a conflict in which there was greater generalship displayed or more courage, and sacrifice and devotion by the men and women at home or the soldiers in the field."

AFTER THE WAR. Rather than surrender, young Wharton and his older brother, Dr. John S. Wharton, a Civil War surgeon, accompanied Gen. Sterling Price and his remaining men to Mexico, only to return to Virginia dispirited.

CHAPLAIN-GENERAL OF THE CONFEDERATE VETERANS. He wore his Confederate heart on his sleeve for the rest of his life, although he philosophically knew and wrote, "It is all over now; we are more united than ever and shall never fall out with each other again. No North, no South, no East, no West, but one inseparable now and forever."

EDUCATION. First studied law at Roanoke College and was admitted to the bar while underage, by a special act, practicing first in Lynchburg VA until becoming an ordained clergyman. While practicing law, he became addicted to alcohol but was dissuaded from that life by his brother, Rev. Morton B. Wharton, who took him to his home in Louisville KY, baptized him and influenced his life toward the ministry.

ORDAINED in 1874 from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Became a beloved Baptist Clergyman for 55 years--40 of them at Brantley Baptist Church in Baltimore MD, where he attracted as many as 2,000 worshippers at one service. At one time, before the completion of a new, roomier church structure, he preached outdoors using a broken telegraph pole as a pulpit. In 1889 he visited Europe with other clergymen, and in 1891 set sail for the Holy Land. In 1898 he submitted his resignation to Brantley Church to free himself to again begin evangelizing, which he felt was his true calling. He returned in 1906 as guest speaker for the church's 20th anniversary and preached several times with 3,000 people in attendance. In 1909, Brantley Church asked him to return once more as their pastor, and he accepted.

EVANGELIST AND WORLD TRAVELER. Evangelism was his true love. At one time [about 1885], his title was Maryland State Evangelist.

REVIVAL CAMP. Co-Founder [along with Rev. F. W. Claybrook] of 'Wharton Grove' revival camp and steamboat landing on the Rappahannock River in VA. [His widow, Lucy, later ran the camp as a summer resort.] "...In the earlier years of the camp, the ten days of its sessions were a period looked forward to with pleasure as the biggest event of the season. Excursion boats brought crowds on Sunday from Norfolk and other parts; gasoline and sail boats lined the [1/4 mile long] wharf and horses and buggies filled the old horse lots. Many of the people had cottages there and spent a part, if not all, of the ten days on the grounds....".

ORPHANAGE FOUNDER
Cambridge Chronicle, 1 July 1899
FOR A NATIONAL ORPHANAGE.
"Rev. H. M. Wharton D. D., of Baltimore, Is about to establish an especial home and school where care and Instruction may be given to the orphans of soldiers and sailors killed In battle or dying of diseases contracted during the late war with Spain. "Whosoever Farm," [200 acres] at Luray, Vir. Is the site for the new work. Dr. Wharton has carried on orphans' homes in three states for many years, and will accomplish much good In this new one. The enterprise is to be supported entirely by voluntary contributions. All Information concerning this "national orphanage" can be obtained from Rev. Dr. H. M. Wharton. Baltimore, Md. and all contributions can be sent to him..."

PRESIDENT, Southern Hospital and Home.

AUTHOR and PUBLISHER. Wrote many faith books [and even a novel] and was owner of his own publishing company, Wharton & Barron. One of his books, PULPIT, PEW AND PLATFORM [as well as WAR SONGS], which can be Googled and read online, has some great biograpical information.

VIRGINIANS OF MARYLAND. Founding member.

MEMORIAL SERVICE
"...There were all classes, all faiths, knowing no religious difference, bound only by a common tie of brotherhood and love and a common sense of deep personal loss...The world goes on with all its tumults and strifes, its occupations and preoccupations, and we too soon forget those who have passed beyond our earthly horizon. Yet this beloved and cherished friend will live in the memories of thousands who will speak of him to their children and their children's children...We shall not look upon his like again...What a remarkable man he was! Never discouraged, never depressed, never cynical or pessimistic. Always buoyant, irrepressible, genial, lovable...He knew every man, woman, and child in the church and congregation...Within the compass of his great heart was ample room for all God's children..."

FAMILY HISTORY...

GRANDSON of documented Revolutionary War Veteran,
PVT. SAMUEL WHARTON
Find A Grave Memorial # 157036255
[Parents were William Wharton and Elizabeth Alsop of Stafford County VA]
b. 27 Jul 1761 VA; d. 10 Dec 1841, Louisa, Louisa, VA.
Military Service:
3rd VA Regiment, wounded at the Battle of Yorktown.

INFO ABOUT PVT. SAMUEL WHARTON from the Library of Virginia Legislative Petitions Digital Collection/Spotsylvania County ...Wife Letitia Hutcherson/Hutchinson’s petition: [Excerpt]
[sic] "...That she the said Letitia Wharton is the widow of the late Samuel Wharton that the said Samuel Wharton first went into service in the war of the revolution in the month of April in the year seventeen hundred & seventy seven as a substitute for one Winston Parker that he was sixteen years old on the 27th of July following & that as substitute for Parker he served for three months. That immediately on his return he was draughted as a militia man. That according to the best of her information when he first marched into service his Captain was Frank Coleman [Francis Coleman, Spotsylvania County Militia] & his colonel was Whitehead Coleman...both of whom she knew well. That from the time he first went into service as above stated he was with the exception of a very few brief intervals constantly in service up to the time of the siege of York. That at the siege of York a few days before the surrender of Cornwallis [19 Oct 1781] he was SEVERELY WOUNDED BY A CANNON BALL & in consequence of said wound, as she believes, he afterwards received a pension from the state of Virginia of fifty dollars per annum [per year, not per month] which pension he continued to receive up to the time of his death – That she knows that he was attached to that part of the army which was under the command of GENERAL LAFAYETTE during their retreat from the British through several counties of the state of Virginia & that he was serving in the army during that retreat & that after General Lafayette effected a junction with GENERAL WAYNE [Anthony Wayne, 10 Jun 1781] constantly up to the time when he was wounded. That she is unable to give accurate information in regard to many of the particulars of his service except as stated above That in relation to much of the service rendered by him she has no information except what she derived from his conversation on the subject. That she has frequently heard him speak of General Lafayette, General Wayne – GENERAL WASHINGTON & DANIEL MORGAN as officers whom he knew...That she believes that he served altogether three years & six months. That at the time he entered the service he resided in Spotsylvania county in the state of Virginia & that during his whole service he was a common soldier. That she the said Letitia Wharton was married to the said Samuel Wharton on the eighth day of march in the year seventeen hundred & eighty-six in the county of Spotsylvania in Virginia & that her maiden name was Letitia Hutchison – That her husband lived in Louisa county in Virginia for many years before his death & that he died on the night of the tenth of december in the year eighteen hundred & forty-one & that according to the best of her knowledge & belief he was at the time of his death in the eightieth (80th) year of his age...That whilst at work in the intrenchments before the town aforesaid your Petitioner received a WOUND IN BOTH HIS HANDS FROM THE ENEMYS CANNON which has rendered your Petitioner INCAPABLE OF PROVIDING FOR HIMSELF A WIFE AND EIGHT CHILDREN. That your Petitioner has been frequently advised to ask some relief from your Honorable body. And being willing to labour as long as possible to support himself and family was unwilling to become burdensome to his Country, but finding his infirmity’s to increase as he advances in years it induces your Petitioner to come froward at this late day to ask relief as you in your Wisdom shall think Just and Right from the Certificates hereunto anexed & your Petitioner will ever pray &c &c [signed] Samuel Wharton..." [NOTE: Some stories passed down INCORRECTLY identified his hand wounds as having been received while passing messages for General Washington, which serves as a reminder that family oral histories should be carefully researched before concluding they are true.] According to the original marriage bond pages found at A.com, Letitia Hutcherson's parents were named William and Sarah. Another document says wife Letitia had at least a sister who lived nearby, named Mary Middlebrook. Samuel died in Louisa County VA; Letitia was living in Culpeper County VA in 1855. OTHER INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT A.COM IN THE "U.S., Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900"

PARENTS OF REV. H. M. WHARTON: Malcolm Hart Wharton (1805-1881) [Parents: Samuel Wharton and Letitia Hutcherson] and Susan Roberts Colvin (1810-1862) [Parents: Gabriel Colvin and Polly Roberts] were married 2 Apr 1829 in Chesterfield VA. No burial place found.

BIRTH: Rev. Dr. Henry Marvin Wharton was born at his family home, named 'Western View', in Culpeper County VA on 11 Sep 1848. When he was 13 years old, at the height of the Civil War, his mother died. Father Malcolm H. Wharton remarried 6 Apr 1864 in Amherst County VA to Eliza L. [nee Davenport] Tinsley, widow of Robert Tinsley.

SIBLINGS...

WILLIAM JOSEPH "JOE" WHARTON (b. est. 1830; said to have died in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC in 1891. Unverified by me.) Appears on the 1850 and 1860 US Censuses in Culpepper County VA. 1860 shows a wife named Mariah/Maria. No burial place found.

MARY E. WHARTON [b. est. 1833, based on 1850 US Census for Culpeper County VA; no other information]

REV. JOHN SAMUEL WHARTON, MD (1834-1920)
Find A Grave Memorial# 153916214
Surgeon in the Civil War; later became a Baptist clergyman.

SUSAN EMILY WHARTON (1836-1865)
Ashby Family Bible:
Dr. J. Woodville ASHBY and Sue E. WHARTON were married on the 18th Nov 1858 in Culpeper County VA. Sue E. ASHBY, wife of J. Woodville ASHBY died August 1865 [husb. d. 1892 Gainsville FL]. Husband was 1st Lt. in 7th Reg., Virginia Infantry (CSA). He remarried Annie Brubaker in Oct 1872.

REV. MORTON BRYAN WHARTON (1839-1908)
Find A Grave Memorial# 25829460
(m. Mary Isabelle "Belle" Irwin in 1864)
Well-known Baptist clergyman who first baptized his younger brother, Henry Marvin Wharton. Appointed by Pres. Garfield as U.S. Consul to Sonneberg-Coberg, Germany. His life accomplishments were on a par with his brother's. Many bio's of him can be read online by Googling his entire name. Morton was the family member who submitted an application to the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) in 1896 [read online at Ancestry.com] which included important early family history. He wrote the introductory biographical sketch of his brother, Rev. Henry Marvin Wharton, in Henry's book, "Pulpit, Pew and Platform". Read the book online by Googling the title.

ELIZA E. WHARTON (1841-1921)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161677899
(m. Dr. William M. Lowry 25 Apr 1866, Amherst County VA)
Capt. William Lowry served in Company Batty C, Virginia Co. C Wise Legion Light Artillery (CSA) in the Civil War
1880 US Census, living in Walton, Boone Co., KY
1900 US Census, widowed, living in Luray VA and working as a college matron. Eliza's two sons, John Milton Lowry and Malcolm Lowry, both lived in Beaumont TX, where she died. Her husband died in Bartow, Polk County FL, Jul 1897.

MALCOLM FREDERICK LAFAYETTE WHARTON (1846-1896)
Find A Grave Memorial# 63353202
38th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (CSA)
Occupation: Lawyer
(m. at age 46 to Elizabeth W. Bailey on 8 Feb 1892 in Rockbridge Co., VA) Died in Uvalde TX where he had gone for his health. One child: Malcolm F. Wharton, Jr.. Wife remarried Dr. Charles C. Violett MD in Uvalde TX Apr 26 1899; one child, Ruth (m. J. W. Abbey). Lived in Garden Grove CA [Read online bio: "History of Orange County, California", Pgs. 726-728]

MARRIAGES: Rev. H. M. Wharton married his first wife, JULIA RUST, 2 Dec 1875 in Luray, VA. Julia died three years later and was buried with their infant son.

Married his second wife, LUCY (aka Lulie) KIMBALL POLLARD on 31 Oct 1893 at Eutaw Place Baptist Church in Baltimore MD, with several states' Governors and Senators, as well as an English Lord, in attendance. He and Lucy had (3) children: May [m. Robert R. Shinnick], Marvyn [m. Alexander Stuart Robertson] and James Pollard Wharton.

The Administrator of this memorial is not related, but discovered this interesting man's life while researching the family of his first wife, Julia Rust Wharton. Thank you to the Shinnick family, who are directly related, for many photos and related information at Ancestry.com.
A fascinating man for all seasons during his time in history. He and (2) brothers, Morton and John, all became Baptist clergymen.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION and CHARACTER.
New York Times:
“Mr. Wharton is about six feet in height, a stalwart, well proportioned man, who stands as erect as a Grenadier, and has the general appearance of one able to do an immense amount of physical as well as mental work. He is a magnetic speaker, a sweet singer, and has a most engaging manner.”

New York Examiner:
“With a voice as pleasant as a harp string, a manner and spirit as genial as a May day, prolific and telling illustrations, sensitive to the needs of his audience, pathos and humor in the same sentence, Dr Wharton plays with his audience as an expert fisherman with his bass.”

[A sample of his home-spun humor after a visit to Cairo, Egypt, "The land is so fertile that where the Nile overflowed every year, one might drive a ten-penney nail in the ground at night and a crowbar might grow from it by morning," or a preacher's mixup at a funeral, "He got his words mixed up and instead of saying the people would be given the opportunity of looking at the corpse, said, 'The corpse will now have an opportunity to walk around and view the people'.]

CIVIL WAR VETERAN (CSA). Enlisted first as a dispensary clerk at age 16; later enlisted as a soldier under Gen. John Brown Gordon, a man he much admired. They were with General Lee at the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse. Wharton's book, WAR SONGS AND POEMS OF THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY was dedicated to Gen. Gordon, who he considered a friend as well as commander.

WAR MEMORIES. "Never, while memory lasts, shall I forget a scene which transpired early in April, 1861, as our family sat at breakfast in the farm house home in Culpeper County, Va. My oldest brother suddenly entered the dining room and exclaimed, "The war has commenced; Fort Sumter is being bombarded!" I was too young to understand these words, but saw, upon the faces of my father and mother, an expression which filled my heart with anxiety. Little did I know that our own beloved State was to become the battleground of the great struggle, and that our home should be left desolate, while some of the dearest members of that little circle around the breakfast table must soon be taken away forever...Our family remained in the County of Culpepper until about the middle of the war. God took our dear mother from us [1862]; the older boys had to go to war and father was alone with his daughters and myself, I being the youngest child. As I was under age and not large enough to be noticed, I was often in conversation with Federal officers, and also with those from the South. One army or the other seemed almost incessantly passing to and fro through our part of the State. It was my privilege to witness the battle of Cedar Mountain, which was fought two miles from my father's home, and the next day I rode over the field in company with him to see if we might, in any way, minister to the wants of the wounded and suffering. It was my first study of a battle field, and the impression made upon my mind, when I saw hundreds of men lying in every position, the most of them dead, others wounded and dying, can never be removed. It was a matter absolutely incomprehensible to me, that men should kill each other as they had done on the bloody field, and I wonder at it to this day...The second day of April, 1865 found me in the breastworks below Petersburg on the Appomattox River, a boy of sixteen, and a soldier in an army of 40,000 men opposing fully five times that many on the other side." [This was the Third Battle of Petersburg, occurring seven days before Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.] He later wrote, "Standing forty years away from the terrible days of the early sixties, we are able to look back now upon those times with cooler blood and calmer judgment. In all the history of the world there has not been a conflict in which there was greater generalship displayed or more courage, and sacrifice and devotion by the men and women at home or the soldiers in the field."

AFTER THE WAR. Rather than surrender, young Wharton and his older brother, Dr. John S. Wharton, a Civil War surgeon, accompanied Gen. Sterling Price and his remaining men to Mexico, only to return to Virginia dispirited.

CHAPLAIN-GENERAL OF THE CONFEDERATE VETERANS. He wore his Confederate heart on his sleeve for the rest of his life, although he philosophically knew and wrote, "It is all over now; we are more united than ever and shall never fall out with each other again. No North, no South, no East, no West, but one inseparable now and forever."

EDUCATION. First studied law at Roanoke College and was admitted to the bar while underage, by a special act, practicing first in Lynchburg VA until becoming an ordained clergyman. While practicing law, he became addicted to alcohol but was dissuaded from that life by his brother, Rev. Morton B. Wharton, who took him to his home in Louisville KY, baptized him and influenced his life toward the ministry.

ORDAINED in 1874 from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Became a beloved Baptist Clergyman for 55 years--40 of them at Brantley Baptist Church in Baltimore MD, where he attracted as many as 2,000 worshippers at one service. At one time, before the completion of a new, roomier church structure, he preached outdoors using a broken telegraph pole as a pulpit. In 1889 he visited Europe with other clergymen, and in 1891 set sail for the Holy Land. In 1898 he submitted his resignation to Brantley Church to free himself to again begin evangelizing, which he felt was his true calling. He returned in 1906 as guest speaker for the church's 20th anniversary and preached several times with 3,000 people in attendance. In 1909, Brantley Church asked him to return once more as their pastor, and he accepted.

EVANGELIST AND WORLD TRAVELER. Evangelism was his true love. At one time [about 1885], his title was Maryland State Evangelist.

REVIVAL CAMP. Co-Founder [along with Rev. F. W. Claybrook] of 'Wharton Grove' revival camp and steamboat landing on the Rappahannock River in VA. [His widow, Lucy, later ran the camp as a summer resort.] "...In the earlier years of the camp, the ten days of its sessions were a period looked forward to with pleasure as the biggest event of the season. Excursion boats brought crowds on Sunday from Norfolk and other parts; gasoline and sail boats lined the [1/4 mile long] wharf and horses and buggies filled the old horse lots. Many of the people had cottages there and spent a part, if not all, of the ten days on the grounds....".

ORPHANAGE FOUNDER
Cambridge Chronicle, 1 July 1899
FOR A NATIONAL ORPHANAGE.
"Rev. H. M. Wharton D. D., of Baltimore, Is about to establish an especial home and school where care and Instruction may be given to the orphans of soldiers and sailors killed In battle or dying of diseases contracted during the late war with Spain. "Whosoever Farm," [200 acres] at Luray, Vir. Is the site for the new work. Dr. Wharton has carried on orphans' homes in three states for many years, and will accomplish much good In this new one. The enterprise is to be supported entirely by voluntary contributions. All Information concerning this "national orphanage" can be obtained from Rev. Dr. H. M. Wharton. Baltimore, Md. and all contributions can be sent to him..."

PRESIDENT, Southern Hospital and Home.

AUTHOR and PUBLISHER. Wrote many faith books [and even a novel] and was owner of his own publishing company, Wharton & Barron. One of his books, PULPIT, PEW AND PLATFORM [as well as WAR SONGS], which can be Googled and read online, has some great biograpical information.

VIRGINIANS OF MARYLAND. Founding member.

MEMORIAL SERVICE
"...There were all classes, all faiths, knowing no religious difference, bound only by a common tie of brotherhood and love and a common sense of deep personal loss...The world goes on with all its tumults and strifes, its occupations and preoccupations, and we too soon forget those who have passed beyond our earthly horizon. Yet this beloved and cherished friend will live in the memories of thousands who will speak of him to their children and their children's children...We shall not look upon his like again...What a remarkable man he was! Never discouraged, never depressed, never cynical or pessimistic. Always buoyant, irrepressible, genial, lovable...He knew every man, woman, and child in the church and congregation...Within the compass of his great heart was ample room for all God's children..."

FAMILY HISTORY...

GRANDSON of documented Revolutionary War Veteran,
PVT. SAMUEL WHARTON
Find A Grave Memorial # 157036255
[Parents were William Wharton and Elizabeth Alsop of Stafford County VA]
b. 27 Jul 1761 VA; d. 10 Dec 1841, Louisa, Louisa, VA.
Military Service:
3rd VA Regiment, wounded at the Battle of Yorktown.

INFO ABOUT PVT. SAMUEL WHARTON from the Library of Virginia Legislative Petitions Digital Collection/Spotsylvania County ...Wife Letitia Hutcherson/Hutchinson’s petition: [Excerpt]
[sic] "...That she the said Letitia Wharton is the widow of the late Samuel Wharton that the said Samuel Wharton first went into service in the war of the revolution in the month of April in the year seventeen hundred & seventy seven as a substitute for one Winston Parker that he was sixteen years old on the 27th of July following & that as substitute for Parker he served for three months. That immediately on his return he was draughted as a militia man. That according to the best of her information when he first marched into service his Captain was Frank Coleman [Francis Coleman, Spotsylvania County Militia] & his colonel was Whitehead Coleman...both of whom she knew well. That from the time he first went into service as above stated he was with the exception of a very few brief intervals constantly in service up to the time of the siege of York. That at the siege of York a few days before the surrender of Cornwallis [19 Oct 1781] he was SEVERELY WOUNDED BY A CANNON BALL & in consequence of said wound, as she believes, he afterwards received a pension from the state of Virginia of fifty dollars per annum [per year, not per month] which pension he continued to receive up to the time of his death – That she knows that he was attached to that part of the army which was under the command of GENERAL LAFAYETTE during their retreat from the British through several counties of the state of Virginia & that he was serving in the army during that retreat & that after General Lafayette effected a junction with GENERAL WAYNE [Anthony Wayne, 10 Jun 1781] constantly up to the time when he was wounded. That she is unable to give accurate information in regard to many of the particulars of his service except as stated above That in relation to much of the service rendered by him she has no information except what she derived from his conversation on the subject. That she has frequently heard him speak of General Lafayette, General Wayne – GENERAL WASHINGTON & DANIEL MORGAN as officers whom he knew...That she believes that he served altogether three years & six months. That at the time he entered the service he resided in Spotsylvania county in the state of Virginia & that during his whole service he was a common soldier. That she the said Letitia Wharton was married to the said Samuel Wharton on the eighth day of march in the year seventeen hundred & eighty-six in the county of Spotsylvania in Virginia & that her maiden name was Letitia Hutchison – That her husband lived in Louisa county in Virginia for many years before his death & that he died on the night of the tenth of december in the year eighteen hundred & forty-one & that according to the best of her knowledge & belief he was at the time of his death in the eightieth (80th) year of his age...That whilst at work in the intrenchments before the town aforesaid your Petitioner received a WOUND IN BOTH HIS HANDS FROM THE ENEMYS CANNON which has rendered your Petitioner INCAPABLE OF PROVIDING FOR HIMSELF A WIFE AND EIGHT CHILDREN. That your Petitioner has been frequently advised to ask some relief from your Honorable body. And being willing to labour as long as possible to support himself and family was unwilling to become burdensome to his Country, but finding his infirmity’s to increase as he advances in years it induces your Petitioner to come froward at this late day to ask relief as you in your Wisdom shall think Just and Right from the Certificates hereunto anexed & your Petitioner will ever pray &c &c [signed] Samuel Wharton..." [NOTE: Some stories passed down INCORRECTLY identified his hand wounds as having been received while passing messages for General Washington, which serves as a reminder that family oral histories should be carefully researched before concluding they are true.] According to the original marriage bond pages found at A.com, Letitia Hutcherson's parents were named William and Sarah. Another document says wife Letitia had at least a sister who lived nearby, named Mary Middlebrook. Samuel died in Louisa County VA; Letitia was living in Culpeper County VA in 1855. OTHER INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT A.COM IN THE "U.S., Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900"

PARENTS OF REV. H. M. WHARTON: Malcolm Hart Wharton (1805-1881) [Parents: Samuel Wharton and Letitia Hutcherson] and Susan Roberts Colvin (1810-1862) [Parents: Gabriel Colvin and Polly Roberts] were married 2 Apr 1829 in Chesterfield VA. No burial place found.

BIRTH: Rev. Dr. Henry Marvin Wharton was born at his family home, named 'Western View', in Culpeper County VA on 11 Sep 1848. When he was 13 years old, at the height of the Civil War, his mother died. Father Malcolm H. Wharton remarried 6 Apr 1864 in Amherst County VA to Eliza L. [nee Davenport] Tinsley, widow of Robert Tinsley.

SIBLINGS...

WILLIAM JOSEPH "JOE" WHARTON (b. est. 1830; said to have died in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC in 1891. Unverified by me.) Appears on the 1850 and 1860 US Censuses in Culpepper County VA. 1860 shows a wife named Mariah/Maria. No burial place found.

MARY E. WHARTON [b. est. 1833, based on 1850 US Census for Culpeper County VA; no other information]

REV. JOHN SAMUEL WHARTON, MD (1834-1920)
Find A Grave Memorial# 153916214
Surgeon in the Civil War; later became a Baptist clergyman.

SUSAN EMILY WHARTON (1836-1865)
Ashby Family Bible:
Dr. J. Woodville ASHBY and Sue E. WHARTON were married on the 18th Nov 1858 in Culpeper County VA. Sue E. ASHBY, wife of J. Woodville ASHBY died August 1865 [husb. d. 1892 Gainsville FL]. Husband was 1st Lt. in 7th Reg., Virginia Infantry (CSA). He remarried Annie Brubaker in Oct 1872.

REV. MORTON BRYAN WHARTON (1839-1908)
Find A Grave Memorial# 25829460
(m. Mary Isabelle "Belle" Irwin in 1864)
Well-known Baptist clergyman who first baptized his younger brother, Henry Marvin Wharton. Appointed by Pres. Garfield as U.S. Consul to Sonneberg-Coberg, Germany. His life accomplishments were on a par with his brother's. Many bio's of him can be read online by Googling his entire name. Morton was the family member who submitted an application to the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) in 1896 [read online at Ancestry.com] which included important early family history. He wrote the introductory biographical sketch of his brother, Rev. Henry Marvin Wharton, in Henry's book, "Pulpit, Pew and Platform". Read the book online by Googling the title.

ELIZA E. WHARTON (1841-1921)
Find A Grave Memorial# 161677899
(m. Dr. William M. Lowry 25 Apr 1866, Amherst County VA)
Capt. William Lowry served in Company Batty C, Virginia Co. C Wise Legion Light Artillery (CSA) in the Civil War
1880 US Census, living in Walton, Boone Co., KY
1900 US Census, widowed, living in Luray VA and working as a college matron. Eliza's two sons, John Milton Lowry and Malcolm Lowry, both lived in Beaumont TX, where she died. Her husband died in Bartow, Polk County FL, Jul 1897.

MALCOLM FREDERICK LAFAYETTE WHARTON (1846-1896)
Find A Grave Memorial# 63353202
38th Battalion, Virginia Light Artillery (CSA)
Occupation: Lawyer
(m. at age 46 to Elizabeth W. Bailey on 8 Feb 1892 in Rockbridge Co., VA) Died in Uvalde TX where he had gone for his health. One child: Malcolm F. Wharton, Jr.. Wife remarried Dr. Charles C. Violett MD in Uvalde TX Apr 26 1899; one child, Ruth (m. J. W. Abbey). Lived in Garden Grove CA [Read online bio: "History of Orange County, California", Pgs. 726-728]

MARRIAGES: Rev. H. M. Wharton married his first wife, JULIA RUST, 2 Dec 1875 in Luray, VA. Julia died three years later and was buried with their infant son.

Married his second wife, LUCY (aka Lulie) KIMBALL POLLARD on 31 Oct 1893 at Eutaw Place Baptist Church in Baltimore MD, with several states' Governors and Senators, as well as an English Lord, in attendance. He and Lucy had (3) children: May [m. Robert R. Shinnick], Marvyn [m. Alexander Stuart Robertson] and James Pollard Wharton.

The Administrator of this memorial is not related, but discovered this interesting man's life while researching the family of his first wife, Julia Rust Wharton. Thank you to the Shinnick family, who are directly related, for many photos and related information at Ancestry.com.


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