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Captain John Field

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Captain John Field Veteran

Birth
Culpeper County, Virginia, USA
Death
31 May 1873 (aged 74)
Burial
Thomaston, DeWitt County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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CAPT. JOHN FIELD
Was born March 31st, 1799, in Culpepper county, Virginia. His father owned a merchant mill on the Potomac river, and in the year 1812 sent John and a negro to Alexandria with two loads of flour for sale; en route they were met by a U. S. army officer, who impressed teams and drivers into the service; in which they involuntarily continued for the space of six months. The subject of this sketch was at that time but thirteen years of age. In the year 1321 he removed to the state of Kentucky, and settled in Shelby county, in the Obannon neighborhood; and in the year following married Miss Alice Obannon, who died two years after the marriage, leaving two sons—James, who died in infancy, and William, who lived with his grandparents until he married, when he removed to Missouri, and died in 1863.
In 1827 Mr. Field was again married, to Miss Mary E. Obannon, a cousin of his former wife. Of this latter marriage eleven children were born; six boys and five girls; three of whom died in Kentucky, eight coming to Texas in February 1852 with their parents. Parmenos O . Field, the eldest son, died in Victoria, of consumption in 1853. Miss M. J. Field was married to Mr. A. B. Leavett, a prominent druggist of Victoria April 1853; and on the 22d of June 1853. Miss Fannie C. Field, and Mr. John A. Emison were married. Capt. Field was surveyor of the city of Victoria in 1854; and in 1857 was elected sheriff. Mrs. Field died August 16th, 1857. From this period on, Captain Field lived principally with his son in law Col. J. A. Emison, of Mission Valley, until his death, which occurred May 25th, 1874. Capt. Field commanded a company of the Kentucky regiment which so distinguished itself at the battle of Buena Vista. He also served two terms in the Kentucky legislature, representing the first term Henry county, and Gallatin, and Carroll the latter. In 1822, while serving in the legislature he had the misfortune to lose his house, which was burned by a counterfeiter and incendiary named Morrow. He engaged at this time in the publication of a democratic paper in Warsaw, Ky. until the commencement of the Mexican war in 1816, when, as stated, he volunteered. He was in the military service thirteen months. Capt. Field was the editor of the Democratic organ for the 10th congressional district, at Covington, until burned out the second time, in the winter of 1851, when he determined upon removing to Texas, much of which state he had seen on his passage through to Mexico in 1846. Though far advanced in age, and feeble, the martial spirit of his younger days seemed to animate him when the intelligence came of the landing of the Yankees at Indianola, and he volunteered among the home guards, and did duty in camp at Green Lake until the disbanding of the guard.
Capt. Field had a martial appearance: standing over six feet in height, straight as an arrow, and prompt in all his actions; he was dignified in his deportment, yet always affable and (Courteous, and it was just as natural for him to be liberal and generous as it was to breathe. In fact his standard is not too often reached "in these degenerate times."
Of his sons.- John M., born June 9th 1840, lived with his family until the commencement of the war between the North and South, when he volunteered in the famous "Hood's brigade," of the Army of Northern Virginia, in which, as the peer of the bravest, he served until the conclusion of hostilities. He was taken a prisoner of war at the battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg, and remained confined in Fort Delaware until exchanged. He was twice wounded. He died in Mission Valley, February 17th, 1879. Albert G., Stanton S., and Thomas M. served in Sibleys brigade in the New Mexican campaign, and. subsequently in Arkansas, and Louisiana
Tom, the youngest, married first, selecting as his life partner, Miss Ella Simpson, of Goliad county; they reside in Mission Valley, and have six children.
Stanton married Miss Leonora Bennett, of the Canaan neighborhood. They have two children, and reside in Frio county, Texas.
Albert, the oldest, was the last to submit to the silken bondage of matrimony; though Col. Emison says, like Barkis, "Al" was willing, but couldn't find the necessary party of the second part to the contract, until Miss Mary Ellen Powers commiserated his forlorn condition, and they were married in 186S. Miss Pattie, youngest child of Capt. Field, was married in 1873 to Mr. Edward Powers, of DeWitt county. They now reside on their extensive ranch, five miles northwest of Victoria, and have an interesting family of three little girls. An interesting little daughter of A. G. Field, and the only child, died in 1872. Genial, good natured, generous "Old Al" resides in Mission Valley, the friend of all who know him. If he has an enemy on earth it must be the effect of causes similar to those that led the Athenian to record his vote against Aristides: He was tired of hearing him called by the proud, democratic title: Aristides, the Just!
Note: Captain Field was the first editor in the United States to publicly advocate the annexation of Texas to the American Union; this he, did through the columns of his paper some years before the election of James K. Polk to the presidency.
He was descended from an old and highly respectable English ancestry,— his mother being an aunt of the lamented General A. P. Hill. (Source: Some Historical Facts in Regard to the Settlement of Victoria Texas, Its Progress and Present Status, by Victor M. Born, Daily Times Print, Laredo TX
Contributor: Sherry (47010546) • [email protected]
CAPT. JOHN FIELD
Was born March 31st, 1799, in Culpepper county, Virginia. His father owned a merchant mill on the Potomac river, and in the year 1812 sent John and a negro to Alexandria with two loads of flour for sale; en route they were met by a U. S. army officer, who impressed teams and drivers into the service; in which they involuntarily continued for the space of six months. The subject of this sketch was at that time but thirteen years of age. In the year 1321 he removed to the state of Kentucky, and settled in Shelby county, in the Obannon neighborhood; and in the year following married Miss Alice Obannon, who died two years after the marriage, leaving two sons—James, who died in infancy, and William, who lived with his grandparents until he married, when he removed to Missouri, and died in 1863.
In 1827 Mr. Field was again married, to Miss Mary E. Obannon, a cousin of his former wife. Of this latter marriage eleven children were born; six boys and five girls; three of whom died in Kentucky, eight coming to Texas in February 1852 with their parents. Parmenos O . Field, the eldest son, died in Victoria, of consumption in 1853. Miss M. J. Field was married to Mr. A. B. Leavett, a prominent druggist of Victoria April 1853; and on the 22d of June 1853. Miss Fannie C. Field, and Mr. John A. Emison were married. Capt. Field was surveyor of the city of Victoria in 1854; and in 1857 was elected sheriff. Mrs. Field died August 16th, 1857. From this period on, Captain Field lived principally with his son in law Col. J. A. Emison, of Mission Valley, until his death, which occurred May 25th, 1874. Capt. Field commanded a company of the Kentucky regiment which so distinguished itself at the battle of Buena Vista. He also served two terms in the Kentucky legislature, representing the first term Henry county, and Gallatin, and Carroll the latter. In 1822, while serving in the legislature he had the misfortune to lose his house, which was burned by a counterfeiter and incendiary named Morrow. He engaged at this time in the publication of a democratic paper in Warsaw, Ky. until the commencement of the Mexican war in 1816, when, as stated, he volunteered. He was in the military service thirteen months. Capt. Field was the editor of the Democratic organ for the 10th congressional district, at Covington, until burned out the second time, in the winter of 1851, when he determined upon removing to Texas, much of which state he had seen on his passage through to Mexico in 1846. Though far advanced in age, and feeble, the martial spirit of his younger days seemed to animate him when the intelligence came of the landing of the Yankees at Indianola, and he volunteered among the home guards, and did duty in camp at Green Lake until the disbanding of the guard.
Capt. Field had a martial appearance: standing over six feet in height, straight as an arrow, and prompt in all his actions; he was dignified in his deportment, yet always affable and (Courteous, and it was just as natural for him to be liberal and generous as it was to breathe. In fact his standard is not too often reached "in these degenerate times."
Of his sons.- John M., born June 9th 1840, lived with his family until the commencement of the war between the North and South, when he volunteered in the famous "Hood's brigade," of the Army of Northern Virginia, in which, as the peer of the bravest, he served until the conclusion of hostilities. He was taken a prisoner of war at the battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg, and remained confined in Fort Delaware until exchanged. He was twice wounded. He died in Mission Valley, February 17th, 1879. Albert G., Stanton S., and Thomas M. served in Sibleys brigade in the New Mexican campaign, and. subsequently in Arkansas, and Louisiana
Tom, the youngest, married first, selecting as his life partner, Miss Ella Simpson, of Goliad county; they reside in Mission Valley, and have six children.
Stanton married Miss Leonora Bennett, of the Canaan neighborhood. They have two children, and reside in Frio county, Texas.
Albert, the oldest, was the last to submit to the silken bondage of matrimony; though Col. Emison says, like Barkis, "Al" was willing, but couldn't find the necessary party of the second part to the contract, until Miss Mary Ellen Powers commiserated his forlorn condition, and they were married in 186S. Miss Pattie, youngest child of Capt. Field, was married in 1873 to Mr. Edward Powers, of DeWitt county. They now reside on their extensive ranch, five miles northwest of Victoria, and have an interesting family of three little girls. An interesting little daughter of A. G. Field, and the only child, died in 1872. Genial, good natured, generous "Old Al" resides in Mission Valley, the friend of all who know him. If he has an enemy on earth it must be the effect of causes similar to those that led the Athenian to record his vote against Aristides: He was tired of hearing him called by the proud, democratic title: Aristides, the Just!
Note: Captain Field was the first editor in the United States to publicly advocate the annexation of Texas to the American Union; this he, did through the columns of his paper some years before the election of James K. Polk to the presidency.
He was descended from an old and highly respectable English ancestry,— his mother being an aunt of the lamented General A. P. Hill. (Source: Some Historical Facts in Regard to the Settlement of Victoria Texas, Its Progress and Present Status, by Victor M. Born, Daily Times Print, Laredo TX
Contributor: Sherry (47010546) • [email protected]


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