Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov

Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov

Birth
Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Death 29 Mar 2017 (aged 88)
Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, California, USA
Burial Burial Details Unknown
Memorial ID 177918358 · View Source
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Nobel Laureate Physicist. He, along with Vitaly L. Ginzburg and Anthony J. Leggett, was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for his pioneering contribution to the theory of superconductivity. He received doctorates in physics from the Institute for Physical Problems (now the P.L. Kapitsa Institute) in Moscow in 1951 and 1955. In the following decades he worked at various scientific institutions and universities in the Soviet Union. In two works in 1952 and 1957, he explained how magnetic flux can penetrate a class of superconductors. This class of materials is known as type-II superconductors. The accompanying arrangement of magnetic flux lines is called the Abrikosov vortex lattice. In 1991 he joined Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois and became a distinguished scientist in its materials science division. He would continue working at Argonne until his retirement. His recent research focused on the origins of magnetoresistance, a property of some materials that change their resistance to electrical flow under the influence of a magnetic field. Besides the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2003, he received numerous honors and awards in both the Soviet Union and the United States for his career work.

Bio by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye
  • Added: 30 Mar 2017
  • Find a Grave Memorial 177918358
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov (25 Jun 1928–29 Mar 2017), Find a Grave Memorial no. 177918358, ; Maintained by Find A Grave Burial Details Unknown.