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 József Fischer

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József Fischer

Birth
Hungary
Death
13 Oct 1942 (aged 69)
Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary
Burial
Farkasrét, Hegyvidék, Budapest, Hungary
Plot
6/11 1-65
Memorial ID
176816426 View Source

"Lágymányosi" Fischer József (1873-1942)

Hungarian architect. His work comprises mainly of city dwelling houses in the form of apartment buildings of graceful Secession and Pre-Modern styles.

His houses in Budapest, most of which are in the Kelenföld and Lágymányos districts, are often embellished with folkloric ornamental motifs. They have decorative facades with statuary or bas-reliefs, wooden eaves and floral mosaic windows. Hexagonal doorways or window openings with slanted upper sides are characteristic of his designs. Wrought iron railings, cut or frosted glass-glazed doors and artistic plaster moulds enrich the interiors.

Many award winning exhibition pavilions were among his creations. These were erected in Vienna, Paris, Milan and London around the turn of the last century. His design of an aquarium for Buenos Aires was awarded first prize in 1912.

József Fischer was born in Királyhida, that is Bruck an der Leitha, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1873. He, as a well-to-do man, owned a restaurant called the Ungarisches Kaffeehaus there.

He worked for József Kauser as construction manager on the St. Stephen's Basilica in Budapest, where he studied architecture and gained a diploma in 1897. He completed further studies in Paris at the École des Beaux-Arts between 1897 and 1901. He later became a member of the Italian Accademia delle Belle Arti. He was active in local affairs as the founding member and president of the Kelenföldi Casino, and in property investment and development in the Lágymányos region of Budapest. He formed partnerships with other architectural artists, chief among whom were Alfonz Detoma and Izidor Scheer. He was also involved in town planning after the draining of the Lágymányos marshes.

He married twice. First, to Olga Gillming in 1900, but this marriage was dissolved in 1907; and then to Amália Pantz, who survived him at his death in 1942.

Sadly, one of his works, a very elegant dwelling house in Budapest was mostly destroyed by Soviet artillery during the Hungarian uprising in 1956, and was never rebuilt to its former glory. Today some of his buildings are listed and protected. However, most of his other works fell into disrepair under the dictatorship of the proletariat.

Then, after the failure of socialism, some were exploited by modern day entrepreneurs by building upon them nondescript and stylistically mismatched extra storeys for profit. In many of his buildings impoverished elderly residents live together with the moneyed noveau riche, entering the same ill-repaired doorways and climbing the same dilapidated stairways. Typical of the current state of these houses are the graffiti on the crumbling walls, the broken or missing windows, the cracked tiles of the inner courts, and almost falling balconies.

Unfortunately, the lack of care and thought for the memory of this once-celebrated man by local officials is shown by one more sorry fact: his memorial stone at his grave site is at risk due to the non-renewal of the cemetery plot fees.

It is hoped that the local bodies or authorities will care enough to save or restore his memorial stone above his interred remains. Until then, may his memory live on.

"Lágymányosi" Fischer József (1873-1942)

Hungarian architect. His work comprises mainly of city dwelling houses in the form of apartment buildings of graceful Secession and Pre-Modern styles.

His houses in Budapest, most of which are in the Kelenföld and Lágymányos districts, are often embellished with folkloric ornamental motifs. They have decorative facades with statuary or bas-reliefs, wooden eaves and floral mosaic windows. Hexagonal doorways or window openings with slanted upper sides are characteristic of his designs. Wrought iron railings, cut or frosted glass-glazed doors and artistic plaster moulds enrich the interiors.

Many award winning exhibition pavilions were among his creations. These were erected in Vienna, Paris, Milan and London around the turn of the last century. His design of an aquarium for Buenos Aires was awarded first prize in 1912.

József Fischer was born in Királyhida, that is Bruck an der Leitha, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1873. He, as a well-to-do man, owned a restaurant called the Ungarisches Kaffeehaus there.

He worked for József Kauser as construction manager on the St. Stephen's Basilica in Budapest, where he studied architecture and gained a diploma in 1897. He completed further studies in Paris at the École des Beaux-Arts between 1897 and 1901. He later became a member of the Italian Accademia delle Belle Arti. He was active in local affairs as the founding member and president of the Kelenföldi Casino, and in property investment and development in the Lágymányos region of Budapest. He formed partnerships with other architectural artists, chief among whom were Alfonz Detoma and Izidor Scheer. He was also involved in town planning after the draining of the Lágymányos marshes.

He married twice. First, to Olga Gillming in 1900, but this marriage was dissolved in 1907; and then to Amália Pantz, who survived him at his death in 1942.

Sadly, one of his works, a very elegant dwelling house in Budapest was mostly destroyed by Soviet artillery during the Hungarian uprising in 1956, and was never rebuilt to its former glory. Today some of his buildings are listed and protected. However, most of his other works fell into disrepair under the dictatorship of the proletariat.

Then, after the failure of socialism, some were exploited by modern day entrepreneurs by building upon them nondescript and stylistically mismatched extra storeys for profit. In many of his buildings impoverished elderly residents live together with the moneyed noveau riche, entering the same ill-repaired doorways and climbing the same dilapidated stairways. Typical of the current state of these houses are the graffiti on the crumbling walls, the broken or missing windows, the cracked tiles of the inner courts, and almost falling balconies.

Unfortunately, the lack of care and thought for the memory of this once-celebrated man by local officials is shown by one more sorry fact: his memorial stone at his grave site is at risk due to the non-renewal of the cemetery plot fees.

It is hoped that the local bodies or authorities will care enough to save or restore his memorial stone above his interred remains. Until then, may his memory live on.


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