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Col William Haywood Tucker

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Col William Haywood Tucker

Birth
Conecuh County, Alabama, USA
Death
16 Jun 1883 (aged 56)
Shelby, Austin County, Texas, USA
Burial
Albany, Shackelford County, Texas, USA
Plot
Masonic, Sec. D, Lot 8
Memorial ID
17615230 View Source

Husband of Elizabeth Matthews.
Delegate to Democratic national convention from Texas in 1876, Texas House of representatives 1881-1883

Suggested edit: COL. WILLIAM HAYWOOD TUCKER
The subject of this sketch. Col. Wm. Haywood Tucker, passed away more than half a century ago. yet his influence was such that, together with his contemporaries and warm personal friends. Governors Throckmorton. Hubbard and Roberts, Judge John H. Reagan and United States Senator Louis T. Wigfall, he still lives in the hearts of all those loyal souls who ever acknowledge the debt Texas owes her greatest and best.

Born in Conucah County. Alabama. April 2, 1827. he was the son of Wm. H. and Elizabeth (Mathews) Tucker. The father, Wm. H. Sr.. was a well-to-do planter, originally of Charleston, S. C, a calling he followed later in both Alabama and Mississippi. He died on his plantation home in Yazoo County. Mississippi, in 1839. Elizabeth Mathews Tucker, the mother, was the daughter of Micajah Mathews, a wealthy planter, also a native of South Carolina, but a resident of Conucah County, Alabama, at the time of his death in 1932. Both Col. Tucker's father. Mr. Wm. H. Tucker, Sr.. and his grandfather Mathews were soldiers in the war of 1812. It will thus be seen that the young Wm. H. inherited the fine spirit of patriotism that was ever one of his strongest characteristics.

The Tuckers are of English extraction, the family having come to the Bermuda Islands from England about the year 1750. Afterwards, they moved to the United States, settling part of the family in Virginia and part in South Carolina. Tuckers from both these states are thus descendants from the same ancestry.

In 1840 young Tucker enrolled as student at Augusta College in Kentucky. In 1841, he came with several brothers to Shelby County, Texas. Here the brothers engaged in farming until the Mexican War broke out. The elder brothers enlisted in the army, leaving Wm. H. the sole manager of a large plantation.

Wm. H. Tucker married Miss Mary Ann Duncan, daughter of Mathew Duncan, a prosperous farmer of Shelby County. Mathew-Duncan, a native of North Carolina, was of Revolutionary stock, his father having served under Generals Green and Sumpter in the Revolution.

Col. and Mrs. Tucker had eight children: Jennie, Florence, Ella, Douglas, Wigfall, Willie, Duncan and Dudley. Two of these, Dudley and Jennie, were skilled musicians. Old residents still recall the delightful music Tucker's Orchestra made, when Dudley was the conductor and Miss Jennie one of the performers in 1873-4.

In 1856 Col. Tucker came to Anderson County, settling on the old Frankston road about one mile North of Palestine. Amongst the valuable papers cherished by Col. Tucker's heirs is the demit issued by Sam Houston Lodge, No. 32 of Shelbyville, dated April 12, 1856, which says: "Bro. Wm. H. Tucker has been regularly initiated as an Entered Apprentice, passed as a Fellow Craft and raised to the Sublime Degree of a Master Mason." It was in this home north of Palestine that Senator Wigfall sought refuge directly after the Civil War. A long and close friendship between the two men resulted in the Tuckers naming their youngest son for the Senator.

At the outbreak of war between the states. Wm. H. Tucker offered his services and was made Captain of the 28th Texas Infantry. He was in continuous service during the entire period of the conflict, performing a conspicuous part in a number of the leading battles in the Trans-Mississippi campaign. Returning to an impoverished country after the war, he devoted his time and talents to helping rehabilitate his beloved state. It was a time that tried men's souls; the carpet-bagger with all his attendant evils, was abroad in the land. What would have happened without the cool counsels and the manly examples of such men as Wm. H. Tucker, it is hard to conjecture. To every forward movement, every constructive plan he gave grave consideration and unselfish influence. Striving ever for his coun-try's good, he gave of his services wherever needed. A staunch Democrat, he saw in his party the way to bring about much needed reforms; so he entered, heart and soul, into party deliberations. From the end of the war until death claimed him, he was a delegate to every state convention, proving to be on all occasions an invincible advocate of the principles of justice and right. His political influence was so universally recognized that he was elected delegate to the National conventions of 1856-1860-1872 and 1876. That his counsels were eagerly heeded an extract from an old letter will show. It was written to Col. Tucker from the "Executive Office, State of Texas. Austin. December 16, 1876" and is signed "R. B. Hubbard." In part it says; .... "I have known you for many years and am familiar with your fidelity to the great principles embodied in the Democratic faith, as well as your most valuable services in our political contests of the past."

Time came when the demand for Col. Tucker's services in the Legislature became insistent. Though his health had become precarious, he yielded. In spite of waning strength, he served with marked ability, ever more mindful of the honest fulfillment of his duties as a Representative than of his ever increasing weakness. At the end of the session, he returned home, only to find his health wrecked. He journeyed to Shackelford County to visit a brother there in the hope that the change might restore his health. But instead, he passed away at his brother's home in June, 1883.

Many stories are told of the characteristics of this most interesting man. A born aristocrat, he was fastidious in his personal habits. In the political campaign, when he was so overwhelmingly chosen for the 18th Legislature, an "old timer" said of him: "I voted for him. but he won't use any but his own comb, and he carries his own towel with him too!"

One who was associated with him in Legislative halls thus described him: "He had a keen appreciation of his duty as a citizen and before its shrine he bowed with a self sacrificing devotion..... Those who knew him best could best understand and appreciate the purity, the truthfulness, fearlessness, steadiness and kindliness of his nature, and the wisdom and earnestness which we have lost in assisting us to unravel the vexed questions which are now threatening the fair name and prosperity of the State he loved so well."

Col. Tucker acquired large property interests,.... many broad acres of fertile land in Anderson County, a plantation at Parker's Bluff, and a place at Tucker. The last named village is named for him. He and his good wife were patterns of hospitality, their comfortable home being ever the rendezvous for a wide circle of delightful friends.

The Tucker sons and daughters have all passed away; but Mrs. Wigfall Tucker, a daughter-in-law, of Palestine, and ten grandchildren survive. The grandchildren are: Tucker Glenn, Vice-President First National Bank, Athens, Texas; Henry Glenn Jr. of California; Mrs. Jennie May Nowlin of Lubbock, Texas; Airs. Irene Wright, Tom Green County, Texas; Dan Glenn of Tom Green Co. Texas; Mrs. Mary Lou Beiler, Palestine, Texas; Miss Willie Mae Tucker, Palestine; L. H. Tucker, J. F. Tucker; Mrs. Elizabeth Lowe, Tom Green County, Texas.
[A Centennial History of Anderson County, Texas" San Antonio, Tex.: Naylor Co., 1936]
Contributor: Sherry (47010546) • [email protected]

Husband of Elizabeth Matthews.
Delegate to Democratic national convention from Texas in 1876, Texas House of representatives 1881-1883

Suggested edit: COL. WILLIAM HAYWOOD TUCKER
The subject of this sketch. Col. Wm. Haywood Tucker, passed away more than half a century ago. yet his influence was such that, together with his contemporaries and warm personal friends. Governors Throckmorton. Hubbard and Roberts, Judge John H. Reagan and United States Senator Louis T. Wigfall, he still lives in the hearts of all those loyal souls who ever acknowledge the debt Texas owes her greatest and best.

Born in Conucah County. Alabama. April 2, 1827. he was the son of Wm. H. and Elizabeth (Mathews) Tucker. The father, Wm. H. Sr.. was a well-to-do planter, originally of Charleston, S. C, a calling he followed later in both Alabama and Mississippi. He died on his plantation home in Yazoo County. Mississippi, in 1839. Elizabeth Mathews Tucker, the mother, was the daughter of Micajah Mathews, a wealthy planter, also a native of South Carolina, but a resident of Conucah County, Alabama, at the time of his death in 1932. Both Col. Tucker's father. Mr. Wm. H. Tucker, Sr.. and his grandfather Mathews were soldiers in the war of 1812. It will thus be seen that the young Wm. H. inherited the fine spirit of patriotism that was ever one of his strongest characteristics.

The Tuckers are of English extraction, the family having come to the Bermuda Islands from England about the year 1750. Afterwards, they moved to the United States, settling part of the family in Virginia and part in South Carolina. Tuckers from both these states are thus descendants from the same ancestry.

In 1840 young Tucker enrolled as student at Augusta College in Kentucky. In 1841, he came with several brothers to Shelby County, Texas. Here the brothers engaged in farming until the Mexican War broke out. The elder brothers enlisted in the army, leaving Wm. H. the sole manager of a large plantation.

Wm. H. Tucker married Miss Mary Ann Duncan, daughter of Mathew Duncan, a prosperous farmer of Shelby County. Mathew-Duncan, a native of North Carolina, was of Revolutionary stock, his father having served under Generals Green and Sumpter in the Revolution.

Col. and Mrs. Tucker had eight children: Jennie, Florence, Ella, Douglas, Wigfall, Willie, Duncan and Dudley. Two of these, Dudley and Jennie, were skilled musicians. Old residents still recall the delightful music Tucker's Orchestra made, when Dudley was the conductor and Miss Jennie one of the performers in 1873-4.

In 1856 Col. Tucker came to Anderson County, settling on the old Frankston road about one mile North of Palestine. Amongst the valuable papers cherished by Col. Tucker's heirs is the demit issued by Sam Houston Lodge, No. 32 of Shelbyville, dated April 12, 1856, which says: "Bro. Wm. H. Tucker has been regularly initiated as an Entered Apprentice, passed as a Fellow Craft and raised to the Sublime Degree of a Master Mason." It was in this home north of Palestine that Senator Wigfall sought refuge directly after the Civil War. A long and close friendship between the two men resulted in the Tuckers naming their youngest son for the Senator.

At the outbreak of war between the states. Wm. H. Tucker offered his services and was made Captain of the 28th Texas Infantry. He was in continuous service during the entire period of the conflict, performing a conspicuous part in a number of the leading battles in the Trans-Mississippi campaign. Returning to an impoverished country after the war, he devoted his time and talents to helping rehabilitate his beloved state. It was a time that tried men's souls; the carpet-bagger with all his attendant evils, was abroad in the land. What would have happened without the cool counsels and the manly examples of such men as Wm. H. Tucker, it is hard to conjecture. To every forward movement, every constructive plan he gave grave consideration and unselfish influence. Striving ever for his coun-try's good, he gave of his services wherever needed. A staunch Democrat, he saw in his party the way to bring about much needed reforms; so he entered, heart and soul, into party deliberations. From the end of the war until death claimed him, he was a delegate to every state convention, proving to be on all occasions an invincible advocate of the principles of justice and right. His political influence was so universally recognized that he was elected delegate to the National conventions of 1856-1860-1872 and 1876. That his counsels were eagerly heeded an extract from an old letter will show. It was written to Col. Tucker from the "Executive Office, State of Texas. Austin. December 16, 1876" and is signed "R. B. Hubbard." In part it says; .... "I have known you for many years and am familiar with your fidelity to the great principles embodied in the Democratic faith, as well as your most valuable services in our political contests of the past."

Time came when the demand for Col. Tucker's services in the Legislature became insistent. Though his health had become precarious, he yielded. In spite of waning strength, he served with marked ability, ever more mindful of the honest fulfillment of his duties as a Representative than of his ever increasing weakness. At the end of the session, he returned home, only to find his health wrecked. He journeyed to Shackelford County to visit a brother there in the hope that the change might restore his health. But instead, he passed away at his brother's home in June, 1883.

Many stories are told of the characteristics of this most interesting man. A born aristocrat, he was fastidious in his personal habits. In the political campaign, when he was so overwhelmingly chosen for the 18th Legislature, an "old timer" said of him: "I voted for him. but he won't use any but his own comb, and he carries his own towel with him too!"

One who was associated with him in Legislative halls thus described him: "He had a keen appreciation of his duty as a citizen and before its shrine he bowed with a self sacrificing devotion..... Those who knew him best could best understand and appreciate the purity, the truthfulness, fearlessness, steadiness and kindliness of his nature, and the wisdom and earnestness which we have lost in assisting us to unravel the vexed questions which are now threatening the fair name and prosperity of the State he loved so well."

Col. Tucker acquired large property interests,.... many broad acres of fertile land in Anderson County, a plantation at Parker's Bluff, and a place at Tucker. The last named village is named for him. He and his good wife were patterns of hospitality, their comfortable home being ever the rendezvous for a wide circle of delightful friends.

The Tucker sons and daughters have all passed away; but Mrs. Wigfall Tucker, a daughter-in-law, of Palestine, and ten grandchildren survive. The grandchildren are: Tucker Glenn, Vice-President First National Bank, Athens, Texas; Henry Glenn Jr. of California; Mrs. Jennie May Nowlin of Lubbock, Texas; Airs. Irene Wright, Tom Green County, Texas; Dan Glenn of Tom Green Co. Texas; Mrs. Mary Lou Beiler, Palestine, Texas; Miss Willie Mae Tucker, Palestine; L. H. Tucker, J. F. Tucker; Mrs. Elizabeth Lowe, Tom Green County, Texas.
[A Centennial History of Anderson County, Texas" San Antonio, Tex.: Naylor Co., 1936]
Contributor: Sherry (47010546) • [email protected]


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