Advertisement

 Paul H Johnson

Advertisement

Paul H Johnson

Birth
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA
Death
12 Dec 1949 (aged 31–32)
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA
Burial
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA
Memorial ID
175800081 View Source


The Seattle Daily Times, December 14, 1949, page 14:
Patrolman Johnson Rites Set for Friday
Funeral services for Paul Johnson, 32-year-old state patrolman, who died Monday night of a bullet wound inflicted by a berserk resident of Ernie’s Grove, near North Bend, will be held at 1 o’clock Friday in Bethel Temple. Burial will be in Washelli under the direction of Mittelstadt Mortuary.
Patrolman Johnson, born and reared in Seattle, was graduated from Ballard High School in 1936. He spent five years in the Army during the Second World War and was stationed in Kodiak, Alaska, as a military policeman much of that time.
In October, 1946, he joined the Washington State Patrol. He was a member of the organization’s Snoqualmie Pass detachment.
Surviving are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gust H. Johnson, 3555 27th Ave. N. E.; four brothers, Stanley, Harold, Wilmer and Alvin Johnson, and two sisters, Mrs. Florence Goosen and Mrs. Ruby Amundsen, all of Seattle.

The Seattle Daily Times, December 12, 1949, page one:
Patrolman, 3 Others Shot Near Snoqualmie
Photo: Crazed Gunman Caught: Handcuffed behind his back, Walter Peden, who shot four men near Snoqualmie today, stood meekly as State Patrol Capt. O. C. Furseth (beside Peden) questioned him this afternoon. Peden had been captured by a neighbor a few minutes earlier. At the left on the porch were Sergt. L. H. Baker and State Patrolman Clare Powers (behind post).
Victim Returns from Hospital, Grabs Gunman
A state patrolman was wounded critically and three civilians were injured in a shooting at Ernie’s Grove, at Meadowbrook, near Snoqualmie, when a resident there went berserk just before 11 o’clock this forenoon.
Their assailant was captured about two hours later while ten state patrolmen and seven sheriff’s deputies were speeding to the scene.
The man, identified by authorities as Walter Peden, who lives at Ernie’s Grove, was captured at the home of a neighbor, George Fitzgerald, one of the three civilians who had been wounded. Fitzgerald was shot in the shoulder.
All four victims, including State Patrolman Paul Johnson, were taken to Nelems Memorial Hospital, North Bend. Johnson with a bullet in his head, later was transferred to Providence Hospital in Seattle.
An emergency operation was performed on the wounded patrolman this afternoon. Johnson, who was commissioned October 1, 1946, lives at 6555 27th Ave. N. E. He is unmarried.
Two civilians were injured seriously. They were C. F. Johnston, shot in the face, and Gordon Peters, who suffered chest wounds.
Random Shots Fired
The State Patrol reported Johnson was shot as he attempted to apprehend the assailant of the civilians who had been shot when the gunman fired at random on neighbors in the community with a homemade .22-caliber rifle.
Peden was captured by Fitzgerald after Fitzgerald had returned from the hospital.
Photo: He Captured Peden: George Fitzgerald (right), husky millwright, rested on his rifle as he told how he overpowered Walter Peden after Peden shot and wounded Fitzgerald and three other men today. The man at left was unidentified – Times Staff photos by John T. Closs (See page 12 for other pictures.)
Peden had fled his own cabin to Fitzgerald’s home after shooting Johnson.
State Patrolman Clare Powers gave this account of Johnson’s wounding:
‘The two patrolmen went to Peden’s house after the shooting of the civilians. They parked their automobile and Powers took cover behind a stump while Johnson stayed behind the car.
Powers called to Peden: “Come out. We’re officers of the law.”
Peden opened a window and fired two shots, hitting Johnson.
Taken to Hospital.
Powers fired several shots into the house and ran to Johnson’s side. A neighbor called a warning that Peden was opening the window again, but Powers drove him back with several more shots. Then he dragged Johnson to the car and took him to the hospital.
The State Patrol explained that while Powers was putting in a call for more patrolmen, Peden left his house and went to Fitzgerald’s.
When Peden approached, Fitzgerald asked his wife, Leah; “Shall I shoot him?”
Fitzgerald went to the rear of the house, got behind Peden and seized him.
Man Held on Ground.
Four patrol officers who had arrived at Peden’s cabin ran across the snow to the Fitzgerald home, where they found Fitzgerald sprawled across the crazed man.
They stood Peden up and handcuffed him.
“I’d sure would like a cigarette,” Peden murmured. “But I’m (See SHOOTING, page 3) an American and I’m not going to ask for one.”
No one gave him one.
State patrol O. C. Furseth asked him why he shot the man.
“I don’t know,” Peden said with a laugh.
Peden had had dinner last night at the Fitzgerald home and talked pleasantly with Mrs. Fitzgerald for an hour this morning before the shootings.
“We always had thought him a little ‘queer,’ said Mrs. Fitzgerald, “but we sure never expected anything like this!”
County Detective Gordon Sandell and Deputy Sheriff Howard Rutan went to the community yesterday to investigate a complaint by Peden that certain individuals were trying to “get him.” The officers could find nothing to support Peden’s fears, and were told that some of his imagined enemies were deceased.
The officers also were told that residents of the community had planned to file complaints against Peden today, seeking a sanity hearing for him.
Others Guard Homes
The scene of the shooting is an isolated cabin-community in a snow-covered forest eight miles northeast of Snoqualmie.
After taking Johnson to the hospital, Powers met other officers who had sped to the scene from Seattle.
Meanwhile, everyone in the community had gone into their homes, many guarding their doors with loaded weapons.
Powers, Furseth and two other patrolmen drove to a covered position 100 yards from Peden’s cabin. They were separated: Powers and Furseth went to the right of the cabin. The two others crept below the cabin to the left.
As the officers were closing in on the cabin, Mrs. Fitzgerald dashed from her home, 100 feet away, and shouted:
“He’s over here. We’ve got him!”
Residents of North Bend alerted by the wailing of the town’s fire siren, which was used to spread an alarm over the shooting, expressed bewilderment over Peden’s sudden violence.
One resident said Peden always had been regarded as a “kindly little fellow who was easy to get along with.” Only last week Peden paid for an advertisement in a Snoqualmie newspaper to find owners for four small kittens he offered to give away.
During Peden’s shooting spree today, however, he killed his own cat and dog and a neighbor’s dog, and wrung a chicken’s neck.
Peden is a veteran of the First World War.

Paul Johnson was a State Trooper for the Washington State Patrol. He served 3 years for the Police Force, dying in the line of duty at age 32. Officer Johnson and his partner was responding to a report of a man randomly shooting at his neighbors near Snoqualmie, Washington. Officer Johnson took a position behind his patrol car. When the Officers called out for the man to surrender, the suspect opened a window and started shooting. Officer Johnson was struck twice, three other people were wounded. Officer Johnson was taken to a local hospital, where he died from his wounds. Officer Johnson was survived by his parents.Trooper Paul Johnson died on December 12, 1949, at the age of 32. Trooper Johnson died of a gunshot wound to the head after responding to a neighborhood disturbance near Snoqualmie. At the time of his death, Trooper Johnson served 3 years with the Washington State Patrol.


The Seattle Daily Times, December 14, 1949, page 14:
Patrolman Johnson Rites Set for Friday
Funeral services for Paul Johnson, 32-year-old state patrolman, who died Monday night of a bullet wound inflicted by a berserk resident of Ernie’s Grove, near North Bend, will be held at 1 o’clock Friday in Bethel Temple. Burial will be in Washelli under the direction of Mittelstadt Mortuary.
Patrolman Johnson, born and reared in Seattle, was graduated from Ballard High School in 1936. He spent five years in the Army during the Second World War and was stationed in Kodiak, Alaska, as a military policeman much of that time.
In October, 1946, he joined the Washington State Patrol. He was a member of the organization’s Snoqualmie Pass detachment.
Surviving are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gust H. Johnson, 3555 27th Ave. N. E.; four brothers, Stanley, Harold, Wilmer and Alvin Johnson, and two sisters, Mrs. Florence Goosen and Mrs. Ruby Amundsen, all of Seattle.

The Seattle Daily Times, December 12, 1949, page one:
Patrolman, 3 Others Shot Near Snoqualmie
Photo: Crazed Gunman Caught: Handcuffed behind his back, Walter Peden, who shot four men near Snoqualmie today, stood meekly as State Patrol Capt. O. C. Furseth (beside Peden) questioned him this afternoon. Peden had been captured by a neighbor a few minutes earlier. At the left on the porch were Sergt. L. H. Baker and State Patrolman Clare Powers (behind post).
Victim Returns from Hospital, Grabs Gunman
A state patrolman was wounded critically and three civilians were injured in a shooting at Ernie’s Grove, at Meadowbrook, near Snoqualmie, when a resident there went berserk just before 11 o’clock this forenoon.
Their assailant was captured about two hours later while ten state patrolmen and seven sheriff’s deputies were speeding to the scene.
The man, identified by authorities as Walter Peden, who lives at Ernie’s Grove, was captured at the home of a neighbor, George Fitzgerald, one of the three civilians who had been wounded. Fitzgerald was shot in the shoulder.
All four victims, including State Patrolman Paul Johnson, were taken to Nelems Memorial Hospital, North Bend. Johnson with a bullet in his head, later was transferred to Providence Hospital in Seattle.
An emergency operation was performed on the wounded patrolman this afternoon. Johnson, who was commissioned October 1, 1946, lives at 6555 27th Ave. N. E. He is unmarried.
Two civilians were injured seriously. They were C. F. Johnston, shot in the face, and Gordon Peters, who suffered chest wounds.
Random Shots Fired
The State Patrol reported Johnson was shot as he attempted to apprehend the assailant of the civilians who had been shot when the gunman fired at random on neighbors in the community with a homemade .22-caliber rifle.
Peden was captured by Fitzgerald after Fitzgerald had returned from the hospital.
Photo: He Captured Peden: George Fitzgerald (right), husky millwright, rested on his rifle as he told how he overpowered Walter Peden after Peden shot and wounded Fitzgerald and three other men today. The man at left was unidentified – Times Staff photos by John T. Closs (See page 12 for other pictures.)
Peden had fled his own cabin to Fitzgerald’s home after shooting Johnson.
State Patrolman Clare Powers gave this account of Johnson’s wounding:
‘The two patrolmen went to Peden’s house after the shooting of the civilians. They parked their automobile and Powers took cover behind a stump while Johnson stayed behind the car.
Powers called to Peden: “Come out. We’re officers of the law.”
Peden opened a window and fired two shots, hitting Johnson.
Taken to Hospital.
Powers fired several shots into the house and ran to Johnson’s side. A neighbor called a warning that Peden was opening the window again, but Powers drove him back with several more shots. Then he dragged Johnson to the car and took him to the hospital.
The State Patrol explained that while Powers was putting in a call for more patrolmen, Peden left his house and went to Fitzgerald’s.
When Peden approached, Fitzgerald asked his wife, Leah; “Shall I shoot him?”
Fitzgerald went to the rear of the house, got behind Peden and seized him.
Man Held on Ground.
Four patrol officers who had arrived at Peden’s cabin ran across the snow to the Fitzgerald home, where they found Fitzgerald sprawled across the crazed man.
They stood Peden up and handcuffed him.
“I’d sure would like a cigarette,” Peden murmured. “But I’m (See SHOOTING, page 3) an American and I’m not going to ask for one.”
No one gave him one.
State patrol O. C. Furseth asked him why he shot the man.
“I don’t know,” Peden said with a laugh.
Peden had had dinner last night at the Fitzgerald home and talked pleasantly with Mrs. Fitzgerald for an hour this morning before the shootings.
“We always had thought him a little ‘queer,’ said Mrs. Fitzgerald, “but we sure never expected anything like this!”
County Detective Gordon Sandell and Deputy Sheriff Howard Rutan went to the community yesterday to investigate a complaint by Peden that certain individuals were trying to “get him.” The officers could find nothing to support Peden’s fears, and were told that some of his imagined enemies were deceased.
The officers also were told that residents of the community had planned to file complaints against Peden today, seeking a sanity hearing for him.
Others Guard Homes
The scene of the shooting is an isolated cabin-community in a snow-covered forest eight miles northeast of Snoqualmie.
After taking Johnson to the hospital, Powers met other officers who had sped to the scene from Seattle.
Meanwhile, everyone in the community had gone into their homes, many guarding their doors with loaded weapons.
Powers, Furseth and two other patrolmen drove to a covered position 100 yards from Peden’s cabin. They were separated: Powers and Furseth went to the right of the cabin. The two others crept below the cabin to the left.
As the officers were closing in on the cabin, Mrs. Fitzgerald dashed from her home, 100 feet away, and shouted:
“He’s over here. We’ve got him!”
Residents of North Bend alerted by the wailing of the town’s fire siren, which was used to spread an alarm over the shooting, expressed bewilderment over Peden’s sudden violence.
One resident said Peden always had been regarded as a “kindly little fellow who was easy to get along with.” Only last week Peden paid for an advertisement in a Snoqualmie newspaper to find owners for four small kittens he offered to give away.
During Peden’s shooting spree today, however, he killed his own cat and dog and a neighbor’s dog, and wrung a chicken’s neck.
Peden is a veteran of the First World War.

Paul Johnson was a State Trooper for the Washington State Patrol. He served 3 years for the Police Force, dying in the line of duty at age 32. Officer Johnson and his partner was responding to a report of a man randomly shooting at his neighbors near Snoqualmie, Washington. Officer Johnson took a position behind his patrol car. When the Officers called out for the man to surrender, the suspect opened a window and started shooting. Officer Johnson was struck twice, three other people were wounded. Officer Johnson was taken to a local hospital, where he died from his wounds. Officer Johnson was survived by his parents.Trooper Paul Johnson died on December 12, 1949, at the age of 32. Trooper Johnson died of a gunshot wound to the head after responding to a neighborhood disturbance near Snoqualmie. At the time of his death, Trooper Johnson served 3 years with the Washington State Patrol.


Family Members

Parents

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement