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 Juliette Adam

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Juliette Adam

Birth
Verberie, Departement de l'Oise, Picardie, France
Death 23 Aug 1936 (aged 99)
Callian, Departement du Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Burial Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France
Plot Division 54, avenue des Ailantes
Memorial ID 173389249 View Source
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Author, Women’s Rights Advocate. She is most recognized for her 19th century publications against prejudices toward women especially women writers. She was the author of over fifty novels along with political essays, the biography of Garibaldi, and dramas for her salon. She was the daughter of Dr. Jean-Louis Lambert, who was an advocate of women's rights. She was educated at home by her father and grandmother, but claims that her childhood was unhappy with her parents often quarreling. In 1852, she became the beautiful teenage bride of Dr Alexis de la Messine, soon gave birth to a daughter and relocated to Paris, France. Upon her arrival to Paris, she began spending time with a literary group, including former members of the Order of Saint-Simon Charles Renouvier and Charles Fauverty who founded and edited “La Revue Philosophique”. In 1858 she published her "Anti-Proudonist Ideas on Love, Women and Marriage" in response to Pierre-Joseph Proudhon’s assessment of the social worth of women; he wrote that it would be a “great mistake to grant women, the inferior helpmates of men, the vote”. In the hopes of keeping royalties for her publications, she used pen names as French law stated that a wife's income belonged to her husband. Her husband was successful in obtaining the royalties of her first book, which had been published at her own expense in 1858 under the pen name of “Madame Juliette Lamber”. Other pen names she used were various combinations of her given and maiden names or both of her married surnames along with “Paul Vasili” and “La Grande Françoise”. To add to her ordeal, her husband republished her 1859 biography of Garibaldi using his name as the author. In 1860, she published “My Village,” a story of the prejudices, joys, and passions of a simple village, and in 1862 after a bout with pneumonia, she published a book about morals, “Laure's Education”. By 1866, the couple had separated as divorce was not legal in the Roman Catholic state of France; one year later her husband died. There was a period when she left the Catholic Church to entertain the occult way of thinking. Three years later, she married a respected lawyer Antoine Edmond Adam, who held a life-time seat in the French Senate as well as being a journalist. They were both deeply involved in the French Republican movement, which opposed the conservative viewpoint. During this time, she openly defended the right of female authors using their own name such as Marie d'Agoult, whose penname was “Daniel Stern” and Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, whose penname was “George Sand”. For forty years, she, as a widow, managed a successful Parisian salon, which included women patrons as well as male intellectuals. She founded the literary magazine “La Nouvelle Review” in 1879 which she edited for eight years, and retained influence its administration until 1899. She published essays written by a community of intellectuals; new authors’ works; her articles that fought for women's suffrage; and with international attentions, her articles which promoted Germanophobia in France, thus staging World War I. Her 1917 book “The Schemes of Kaiser” had been released worldwide in English. This led to her being one if not the only woman present on June 28, 1919 at the ceremonial signing of the Treaty of Versailles ending World War I. The 1879 novel “Grecque” chronicles the life of an ancient Greek woman. Her 1883 novel “Païenne” is a fictional exchange of passionate letters about a “pagan woman”. The 1913 novel “Chrétienne” or “The Christian Woman” marks her return in 1905 to Catholicism. Before her death in 1936, less than two months shy of her 100th birthday, she published her seven-volume memoirs. In 1882, she purchased the estate of an abbey in Gif-sur-Yvette where she lived from 1904 until her death. In 2007, the Lilly Library at Indiana University, Bloomington published a collection of her letters. On September 14, 1936, for the 100th anniversary of her birth, a street was named in her honor in her hometown. Her well-known quote is “Death is the opening of a more subtle life. In the flower, it sets free the perfume; in the chrysalis, the butterfly; in man, the soul.”

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Tim Reynolds
  • Added: 1 Dec 2016
  • Find a Grave Memorial 173389249
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/173389249/juliette-adam : accessed ), memorial page for Juliette Adam (4 Oct 1836–23 Aug 1936), Find a Grave Memorial ID 173389249, citing Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France ; Maintained by Find a Grave .