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 Rudolf Christoph Eucken

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Rudolf Christoph Eucken Famous memorial

Birth
Aurich, Landkreis Aurich, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
Death
15 Sep 1926 (aged 80)
Jena, Stadtkreis Jena, Thüringen, Germany
Burial
Aurich, Landkreis Aurich, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany
Memorial ID
171869108 View Source

Nobel Prize in Literature. Rudolf Christoph Eucken, a German author, received the 1908 Nobel Prize in Literature, in recognition, according to the director of the Swedish Academy and presenter of the prize, Harald Hjärne , “of his earnest search for truth, his penetrating power of thought, his wide range of vision, and the warmth and strength in presentation with which in his numerous works he has vindicated and developed an idealistic philosophy of life." He was a idealistic philosopher, interpreter of Aristotle, and author of works in ethics and religion. He centered his philosophy upon actual human experience. He held that the human soul differentiates humans from the rest of the natural world and that the soul could not be explained only by reference to natural processes. Little is documented about his childhood except his father's death happened when Euken was young, leaving his very busy mother to care for him. He attended the University of Gottingen, receiving a PhD in classical philology and ancient history, then continuing his studies at Berlin University. He taught school for five years before being appointed in 1871 as professor of philosophy at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 1874, he left that position to become professor, holding the chair of the Department of Philosophy, at the University of Jena, staying in that position until retirement in 1920. Between 1911 and 1913, he was an exchange professor in England and in the United States at the Harvard University and a Deem Lecturer at the New York University. His 1921 publication “Socialism: An Analysis,” attacked Socialism as a system that limits human freedom and denigrates spiritual and cultural aspects of life. This publication followed with his 1923 “Individual and Society.” Other of his numerous writings include “The Problem of Human Life as Viewed by the Great Thinkers from Plato to the Present Time” in 1890, “The Meaning and Value of Life” in 1909 and “Can We Still Be Christians?” in 1914. Numerous of his books have been published in English and often he revised his own book, hence one book could have a couple of publication dates. As a German patriot, the outcome of World War I took a blow to his spirit. He along with future Nobel Prize recipients, a Frenchman, Anatole France and an Englishman, John Galsworthy, wrote a collection of articles published by the Nobel Library calling upon the United States to develop "such moral strength as will successfully overcome all conflicts and lead to splendid results, for the benefit not only of the American nation, but of all mankind." He married and the couple had one daughter and two sons, with one son entering economics and the other physics.

Nobel Prize in Literature. Rudolf Christoph Eucken, a German author, received the 1908 Nobel Prize in Literature, in recognition, according to the director of the Swedish Academy and presenter of the prize, Harald Hjärne , “of his earnest search for truth, his penetrating power of thought, his wide range of vision, and the warmth and strength in presentation with which in his numerous works he has vindicated and developed an idealistic philosophy of life." He was a idealistic philosopher, interpreter of Aristotle, and author of works in ethics and religion. He centered his philosophy upon actual human experience. He held that the human soul differentiates humans from the rest of the natural world and that the soul could not be explained only by reference to natural processes. Little is documented about his childhood except his father's death happened when Euken was young, leaving his very busy mother to care for him. He attended the University of Gottingen, receiving a PhD in classical philology and ancient history, then continuing his studies at Berlin University. He taught school for five years before being appointed in 1871 as professor of philosophy at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 1874, he left that position to become professor, holding the chair of the Department of Philosophy, at the University of Jena, staying in that position until retirement in 1920. Between 1911 and 1913, he was an exchange professor in England and in the United States at the Harvard University and a Deem Lecturer at the New York University. His 1921 publication “Socialism: An Analysis,” attacked Socialism as a system that limits human freedom and denigrates spiritual and cultural aspects of life. This publication followed with his 1923 “Individual and Society.” Other of his numerous writings include “The Problem of Human Life as Viewed by the Great Thinkers from Plato to the Present Time” in 1890, “The Meaning and Value of Life” in 1909 and “Can We Still Be Christians?” in 1914. Numerous of his books have been published in English and often he revised his own book, hence one book could have a couple of publication dates. As a German patriot, the outcome of World War I took a blow to his spirit. He along with future Nobel Prize recipients, a Frenchman, Anatole France and an Englishman, John Galsworthy, wrote a collection of articles published by the Nobel Library calling upon the United States to develop "such moral strength as will successfully overcome all conflicts and lead to splendid results, for the benefit not only of the American nation, but of all mankind." He married and the couple had one daughter and two sons, with one son entering economics and the other physics.

Bio by: Linda Davis

Gravesite Details

Original burial place: Jenaer Nordfriedhof / Passow family plot.


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Thomas Haas
  • Added: 26 Oct 2016
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 171869108
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/171869108/rudolf-christoph-eucken: accessed ), memorial page for Rudolf Christoph Eucken (5 Jan 1846–15 Sep 1926), Find a Grave Memorial ID 171869108, citing Aurich Stadtfriedhof, Aurich, Landkreis Aurich, Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany; Maintained by Find a Grave .