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John Henry Shine

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John Henry Shine

Birth
Kenosha County, Wisconsin, USA
Death
4 Jul 1930 (aged 82)
Sonora, Tuolumne County, California, USA
Burial
Sonora, Tuolumne County, California, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
"Rads Ramblings" Merced Sun Star, July 14, 1930
John H. Shine
John H. Shine, who died in Sonora July 4 at the age of 82, was well known to many of the old timers in Merced county. He was the uncle of Mrs. Richard Meehan of Merced. Shine had a long and colorful career. As a soldier in the Union army at 14 and all through the Civil War, as an early California stage driver who had encounters with Black Bart, later as a Pony Express and stage line operator, he had plenty of thrills. For some years Shine operated the stage line between Oakdale and Sonora, prior to the building of the Sierra railway, which now connects those points. In his more mature years Shine served as state senator and United States Marshall. In the middle nineties Shine was Merced county's representative in the state senate when the district was composed of Merced, Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Mariposa counties. This was in 1895 and 1897. In 1902 he was appointed U. S. Marshall under McKinley and Roosevelt regimes. It was as a campaigner for the senate that Merced county got acquainted with John Shine. He had a particularly warm spot in his affections for this county, especially Los Banos. He had a close race for the senate on one occasion, and Los Banos pulled him over the top.
The papers speak very kindly of this pioneer. One refers to him as the "grand old man of Tuolumne." Up in Sonora they used to say jokingly, "It was a man named Shine who brought us our first electric lights." He is certainly missed in Sonora, and there are regrets and reviewing of fond reminiscences in the foothills.
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John H. Shine, City Treasurer of Sonora, California, has been a prominent and progressive citizen of Sonora for the past twenty years. Mr. Shine is a native of Wisconsin, born at Kenosha, May 5, 1848, son of Dennis and Eliza (Leston) Shine, natives of Ireland. His parents came to America in 1846 and located in Wisconsin. In their family of nine children he was fourth-born. He attended school until he was fourteen, and at that youthful age enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-third Regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers. He served as a private until the close of the war, and after being discharged from the service returned to his native State, where he engaged in farming until 1868. That year he came to California, making the journey via Panama. Arrived in the Golden State, Mr. Shine engaged in mining in the first year at Sutter creek in Amador county. He then came to Sonora, and during the few years that followed was employed in stage driving. Mr. Shine was the recipient of a handsome gold timepiece, presented to him by Wells, Fargo & Co., November 15, 1876, for valuable services rendered to that company, he having been instrumental in saving their treasure from highwaymen. In 1872 he purchased the well-known pioneer livery stables, formerly the property of Robert Boyd. This establishment is the largest of its kind in the mountains. It has the capacity sufficient to accommodate seventy-five head of horses besides his own stock; he furnishes all sorts of turnouts for the use of commercial travelers, campers, surveying parties, tourists, etc. He furnishes transportation, under special contracts, in stage loads, to tourists unto Yo Semite valley. As a stage-line manager Mr. Shine has had much practical experience; was a stockholder in and superintendent of the Nevada Stage Company for many years. He disposed of his interest in that company some years ago. In 1885 he secured mail contracts, and has since managed the stage lines between Sonora, Oakdale, Copperopolis and other points, daily lines, Sundays excepted. This business is done under the firm name of J. H. Shine & Co., one-half of the capital stock being owned by Mr. Shine. He is a Republican in the full meaning of the word. He is a School Trustee and a member of the City Council, and is President of the Twenty-ninth District Fair Association. To some extent Mr. Shine is still interested in mining property in Tuolumne county. He owns the Charity mine, located eleven miles from Sonora, which however, is not being worked at the present time. He is prominent member of the G. A. R. and the I. O. O. F., having taken the Encampment degree; is also prominently identified with the Chosen Friends and the A. O. U. W. Mr. Shine is a man of family. He was married, at Sonora, January 7, 1877, to Miss Hannah T. Gibbons, a native of California and a daughter of David Gibbons, who came to this State in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Shine have five children, namely: John D., Alice T., Francis L., Charles D., and Nellie.

Memorial and Biographical History
Merced, Stanislaus, Calaveras, Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties California: page: 389



"Rads Ramblings" Merced Sun Star, July 14, 1930
John H. Shine
John H. Shine, who died in Sonora July 4 at the age of 82, was well known to many of the old timers in Merced county. He was the uncle of Mrs. Richard Meehan of Merced. Shine had a long and colorful career. As a soldier in the Union army at 14 and all through the Civil War, as an early California stage driver who had encounters with Black Bart, later as a Pony Express and stage line operator, he had plenty of thrills. For some years Shine operated the stage line between Oakdale and Sonora, prior to the building of the Sierra railway, which now connects those points. In his more mature years Shine served as state senator and United States Marshall. In the middle nineties Shine was Merced county's representative in the state senate when the district was composed of Merced, Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Mariposa counties. This was in 1895 and 1897. In 1902 he was appointed U. S. Marshall under McKinley and Roosevelt regimes. It was as a campaigner for the senate that Merced county got acquainted with John Shine. He had a particularly warm spot in his affections for this county, especially Los Banos. He had a close race for the senate on one occasion, and Los Banos pulled him over the top.
The papers speak very kindly of this pioneer. One refers to him as the "grand old man of Tuolumne." Up in Sonora they used to say jokingly, "It was a man named Shine who brought us our first electric lights." He is certainly missed in Sonora, and there are regrets and reviewing of fond reminiscences in the foothills.
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John H. Shine, City Treasurer of Sonora, California, has been a prominent and progressive citizen of Sonora for the past twenty years. Mr. Shine is a native of Wisconsin, born at Kenosha, May 5, 1848, son of Dennis and Eliza (Leston) Shine, natives of Ireland. His parents came to America in 1846 and located in Wisconsin. In their family of nine children he was fourth-born. He attended school until he was fourteen, and at that youthful age enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-third Regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers. He served as a private until the close of the war, and after being discharged from the service returned to his native State, where he engaged in farming until 1868. That year he came to California, making the journey via Panama. Arrived in the Golden State, Mr. Shine engaged in mining in the first year at Sutter creek in Amador county. He then came to Sonora, and during the few years that followed was employed in stage driving. Mr. Shine was the recipient of a handsome gold timepiece, presented to him by Wells, Fargo & Co., November 15, 1876, for valuable services rendered to that company, he having been instrumental in saving their treasure from highwaymen. In 1872 he purchased the well-known pioneer livery stables, formerly the property of Robert Boyd. This establishment is the largest of its kind in the mountains. It has the capacity sufficient to accommodate seventy-five head of horses besides his own stock; he furnishes all sorts of turnouts for the use of commercial travelers, campers, surveying parties, tourists, etc. He furnishes transportation, under special contracts, in stage loads, to tourists unto Yo Semite valley. As a stage-line manager Mr. Shine has had much practical experience; was a stockholder in and superintendent of the Nevada Stage Company for many years. He disposed of his interest in that company some years ago. In 1885 he secured mail contracts, and has since managed the stage lines between Sonora, Oakdale, Copperopolis and other points, daily lines, Sundays excepted. This business is done under the firm name of J. H. Shine & Co., one-half of the capital stock being owned by Mr. Shine. He is a Republican in the full meaning of the word. He is a School Trustee and a member of the City Council, and is President of the Twenty-ninth District Fair Association. To some extent Mr. Shine is still interested in mining property in Tuolumne county. He owns the Charity mine, located eleven miles from Sonora, which however, is not being worked at the present time. He is prominent member of the G. A. R. and the I. O. O. F., having taken the Encampment degree; is also prominently identified with the Chosen Friends and the A. O. U. W. Mr. Shine is a man of family. He was married, at Sonora, January 7, 1877, to Miss Hannah T. Gibbons, a native of California and a daughter of David Gibbons, who came to this State in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Shine have five children, namely: John D., Alice T., Francis L., Charles D., and Nellie.

Memorial and Biographical History
Merced, Stanislaus, Calaveras, Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties California: page: 389





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