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Jonathan Brown II

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Jonathan Brown II

Birth
Reading, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
14 Mar 1820 (aged 78)
Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial
Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.5406981, Longitude: -71.8943455
Memorial ID
View Source
See Jonathan Brown at Burial UNKNOWN.

20160914 - Notified owner of my findings.

Father’s name: Jonathan Brown
Mother’s name: Mehitable Hay Brown

Married Huldah Hawkes Brown on Mar. 1, 1764 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA.

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served during the Revolutionary war as a minuteman that answered the call for the alarm for Lexington and Concord and served for 10-1/2 days at Cambridge. He again answered the call for the alarm from the battle of Bennington where he was stationed at East Hoosick in New York for 10 days.From the History of New Hampshire, p. 1560: (V) Jonathan (2), son of Jonathan (1) and Mehitable Brown, probably located on the lot No. 106 mentioned above [see father], occupying a house built some years before by Benjamin Gould. He was first taxed in 1764 and in 1769 a public school was kept in his house. January 3, 1771, he purchased of Joseph Lynde, of Charlestown, lot No. 105, lying directly south of the Hay lot, which was long known as the Brown estate, more recently owned by Asaph Carter and his son Edward R. On his way from Reading to Portsmouth [p. 1943 says Westminster], Mr. Brown seems to have sojourned a while in Leominster, where he married Huldah Hawkes. He died March 14, 1820, aged eighty years. She died January 1, 1818, aged seventy-five. Their children were: Jonathan, Benjamin, Joseph, (died young), Huldah, Sally, Joseph and John.

From DAR #29001: Jonathan Brown (1740-1821) served as sergeant at the Lexington and Bennington Alarms. He was born in Reading; died in Westminster.

From #151014: Jonathan Brown served as sergeant in Colonel Asa Whitcomb's regiment at the Lexington Alarm. He was born in Reading; died, 1820 in Westminster, Mass.

Jonathan Brown, of Westminster, Mass., is assumed to have been descended from Nicholas Brown of Westminster and Reading, but no certain evidence of such descent is known. - History of New Ipswich by Blood, p. 267
See Jonathan Brown at Burial UNKNOWN.

20160914 - Notified owner of my findings.

Father’s name: Jonathan Brown
Mother’s name: Mehitable Hay Brown

Married Huldah Hawkes Brown on Mar. 1, 1764 in Reading, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA.

~

served during the Revolutionary war as a minuteman that answered the call for the alarm for Lexington and Concord and served for 10-1/2 days at Cambridge. He again answered the call for the alarm from the battle of Bennington where he was stationed at East Hoosick in New York for 10 days.From the History of New Hampshire, p. 1560: (V) Jonathan (2), son of Jonathan (1) and Mehitable Brown, probably located on the lot No. 106 mentioned above [see father], occupying a house built some years before by Benjamin Gould. He was first taxed in 1764 and in 1769 a public school was kept in his house. January 3, 1771, he purchased of Joseph Lynde, of Charlestown, lot No. 105, lying directly south of the Hay lot, which was long known as the Brown estate, more recently owned by Asaph Carter and his son Edward R. On his way from Reading to Portsmouth [p. 1943 says Westminster], Mr. Brown seems to have sojourned a while in Leominster, where he married Huldah Hawkes. He died March 14, 1820, aged eighty years. She died January 1, 1818, aged seventy-five. Their children were: Jonathan, Benjamin, Joseph, (died young), Huldah, Sally, Joseph and John.

From DAR #29001: Jonathan Brown (1740-1821) served as sergeant at the Lexington and Bennington Alarms. He was born in Reading; died in Westminster.

From #151014: Jonathan Brown served as sergeant in Colonel Asa Whitcomb's regiment at the Lexington Alarm. He was born in Reading; died, 1820 in Westminster, Mass.

Jonathan Brown, of Westminster, Mass., is assumed to have been descended from Nicholas Brown of Westminster and Reading, but no certain evidence of such descent is known. - History of New Ipswich by Blood, p. 267


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