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Robert Capa

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Robert Capa Famous memorial

Birth
Budapest, Belváros-Lipótváros, Budapest, Hungary
Death
25 May 1954 (aged 40)
Thái Bình, Thái Bình, Vietnam
Burial
Amawalk, Westchester County, New York, USA GPS-Latitude: 41.2928772, Longitude: -73.7724609
Plot
Plot #189
Memorial ID
View Source
Photographer. Robert Capa was a Hungarian-American photographer and photojournalist. He covered World War II from 1941 to 1945 in the European theatre, receiving the Medal of Freedom Citation from General Dwight D. Eisenhower. His photographs of the D-Day landings are classics. Born André Friedmann of Jewish ancestry, Capa left Hungary in 1930 for Berlin to enroll in the German Academy for Politic, as a student of journalism and political science. While in school, he served as a darkroom assistant at the Deutsche Photodienst Agency. With the rise of the Nazi Party in 1933 and the persecution of the Jews by the Nazis, he escaped Germany for Paris. At this point, he changed his name to Robert Capa. While in Paris, he shared a darkroom with humanist photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson and Polish photographer and photojournalist David Seymour or "Chim", who had been covering the Spanish Civil War. While in Paris, he met Gerda Taro, a German Jewish photographer, who became his close professional colleague. Making several trips to Spain, he and Taro covered the Spanish Civil War. During the horrors of war in 1937, Taro was traveling to a town for more film when she was killed in a car vs tank crash. With Taro being one of the first female photojournalism, he felt guilty for letting her go alone on the trip. In 1938 he published a photographic book covering the Spanish Civil War as a tribute to Taro, "Death in the Making." He is internationally known for his 1936 Spanish Civil War photograph "Death of a Loyalist Soldier." With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, he immigrated to the United States, becoming a freelance photographer, mainly for "Life" magazine. In 1946 he became an American citizen. From 1941 to 1946, he was a war correspondent for "Life," "Time" and "Collier's" magazines. Being part of some of the heaviest of battles, he traveled with units from the United States Army, documenting Allied victories in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, the Allied landing at Normandy, and the Allied capture of Leipzig, Nuremberg, and Berlin. Joining with his long-time colleagues Cartier-Bresson and Chim, plus George Rodger, the four photographers founded in 1947 Magnum, an agency that provides photographs by freelance photographers to international publications. Magnum was the first agency of this kind, and the successful business consumed much of his time managing it. He served as the director of the Magnum office in Paris from 1950 to 1953. He found using a small 35-millimeter camera would capture the human facial expression easily. His next assignment was to photograph the declaration of the independence of the Hebrew State of Israel and the fighting in Palestine in 1948. In 1954 he accepted an assignment for "Life" magazine to travel to Hanoi, Vietnam to photograph the French War in Indochina. While in Vietnam, he stepped on a landmine and was killed. He became known as the quintessential war photographer, making him one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. Besides "Death in the Making", he published his memoir of World War II, "Slightly Out of Focus" in 1947; "Images of War" 1964, and posthumously from the 70,000 negatives that were left to his brother, "Children of War, Children of Peace" in 1991 and "Robert Capa: Photographs" in 1996
Photographer. Robert Capa was a Hungarian-American photographer and photojournalist. He covered World War II from 1941 to 1945 in the European theatre, receiving the Medal of Freedom Citation from General Dwight D. Eisenhower. His photographs of the D-Day landings are classics. Born André Friedmann of Jewish ancestry, Capa left Hungary in 1930 for Berlin to enroll in the German Academy for Politic, as a student of journalism and political science. While in school, he served as a darkroom assistant at the Deutsche Photodienst Agency. With the rise of the Nazi Party in 1933 and the persecution of the Jews by the Nazis, he escaped Germany for Paris. At this point, he changed his name to Robert Capa. While in Paris, he shared a darkroom with humanist photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson and Polish photographer and photojournalist David Seymour or "Chim", who had been covering the Spanish Civil War. While in Paris, he met Gerda Taro, a German Jewish photographer, who became his close professional colleague. Making several trips to Spain, he and Taro covered the Spanish Civil War. During the horrors of war in 1937, Taro was traveling to a town for more film when she was killed in a car vs tank crash. With Taro being one of the first female photojournalism, he felt guilty for letting her go alone on the trip. In 1938 he published a photographic book covering the Spanish Civil War as a tribute to Taro, "Death in the Making." He is internationally known for his 1936 Spanish Civil War photograph "Death of a Loyalist Soldier." With the outbreak of World War II in Europe, he immigrated to the United States, becoming a freelance photographer, mainly for "Life" magazine. In 1946 he became an American citizen. From 1941 to 1946, he was a war correspondent for "Life," "Time" and "Collier's" magazines. Being part of some of the heaviest of battles, he traveled with units from the United States Army, documenting Allied victories in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, the Allied landing at Normandy, and the Allied capture of Leipzig, Nuremberg, and Berlin. Joining with his long-time colleagues Cartier-Bresson and Chim, plus George Rodger, the four photographers founded in 1947 Magnum, an agency that provides photographs by freelance photographers to international publications. Magnum was the first agency of this kind, and the successful business consumed much of his time managing it. He served as the director of the Magnum office in Paris from 1950 to 1953. He found using a small 35-millimeter camera would capture the human facial expression easily. His next assignment was to photograph the declaration of the independence of the Hebrew State of Israel and the fighting in Palestine in 1948. In 1954 he accepted an assignment for "Life" magazine to travel to Hanoi, Vietnam to photograph the French War in Indochina. While in Vietnam, he stepped on a landmine and was killed. He became known as the quintessential war photographer, making him one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century. Besides "Death in the Making", he published his memoir of World War II, "Slightly Out of Focus" in 1947; "Images of War" 1964, and posthumously from the 70,000 negatives that were left to his brother, "Children of War, Children of Peace" in 1991 and "Robert Capa: Photographs" in 1996

Bio by: Linda Davis



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: Apr 25, 1998
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/169/robert-capa: accessed ), memorial page for Robert Capa (22 Oct 1913–25 May 1954), Find a Grave Memorial ID 169, citing Amawalk Friends Cemetery, Amawalk, Westchester County, New York, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.