Advertisement

 Elizabeth <I>Pennington</I> Back

Advertisement

Elizabeth Pennington Back

Birth
Greenville County, South Carolina, USA
Death
1865 (aged 69–70)
Missouri, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown. Specifically: Probably buried on her farm in Missouri
Memorial ID
167921701 View Source

DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. IT IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. DEVIOUS PEOPLE KEEP TRYING TO STEAL MY MEMORIALS, BUT THE MANAGERS AT FINDAGRAVE HAVE STOPPED IT, AND THEY WILL CONTINUE TO STOP IT. THE GENEALOGY SHOWN HERE IS ACCURATE & PROVEN…PLEASE STOP TRYING TO DESTROY IT.

The people who still peddle the fraudulent genealogy of the Back (Bach) family either do not know who this woman is, or they purposefully ignore her. They claim that her married name (Elizabeth Back), on two land deeds (in 1823 and 1831), and in the 1815 Tax List, is Elizabeth (Hoffman) Back, the wife of Henry Back (1743-1809), in their bizarre attempts to "prove" that Elizabeth (Hoffman) Back lived in southeastern Kentucky!

This woman, Elizabeth Pennington Back, was the daughter of Abel Pennington and his wife Christina (whose first husband may have been Barnabas Roark). But Christina had died, when Elizabeth was young. Elizabeth Pennington was born in South Carolina. In 1804, when she was nine years old, she, her father, and her siblings, migrated to southeastern Kentucky, and they settled along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

In 1809, when she was just 14 years old, Elizabeth Pennington had an affair with Andrew Cope, who lived down the road. She got pregnant and she gave birth to a little girl she named Elizabeth, in 1810. The problem was…Andrew Cope was married, and he had three children, and so there was quite a scandal.

Shortly after that little girl was born, Andrew Cope and his family left Kentucky, because of the scandal and embarrassment. But he said that Elizabeth could live on 100 acres of his land, along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

Meanwhile, over in Virginia, Lewis Back (1787-1865), the son of Henry Back (1743-1809) and Elizabeth Hoffman Back (1746-1816, the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg), had left his home in Madison County, Virginia, after his father had died in 1809, and he moved down to Russell County, Virginia, to live with his cousin John Back (1774-1853) and his wife Catherine Robertson. *****The father of Lewis Back (1787-1865) was Henry Back (1743-1809), who was a brother to Joseph Back (1745-1819), who was the father of John Back (1774-1853), who married Catherine Robertson. That makes Lewis Back (1787-1865) a cousin of John Back (1774-1853).

When John Back, his wife Catherine, and their children, left Russell County, Virginia, in the fall of 1810, and moved to southeastern Kentucky, Lewis Back went with them. They also settled along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

Elizabeth Pennington soon met Lewis Back. They got married on June 22, 1812. Lewis then adopted Elizabeth's little, illegitimate daughter, and he raised her as his own.

In 1815, Elizabeth was seen in the Tax List, in Knox County, KY, still living on that 100 acres that Andrew Cope had let her live on, and so Andrew Cope's name was seen in the far right column as owning that land. Elizabeth's husband, Lewis Back, was listed next to her. So, Lewis was living with Elizabeth, on that 100 acres of land that Andrew Cope had let Elizabeth live on,

Also seen on that 1815 Tax List were Lewis' two cousins, John Back (1774-1853) and his brother Henry Back (1785-1871). John and Henry's father, Joseph Back (1745-1819), was a brother to Lewis' father Henry Back (1743-1809). At that time, in 1815, John Back was sharecropping 175 acres that was owned by Thomas Robertson, who was the brother of his wife Catherine Robertson. Mr. Robertson's name was seen in the far right column as owning that land. John back later bought that land from Mr. Robertson, on 11-17-1817. That 1815 Tax List is attached to this memorial.

In the summer of 1823, Andrew Cope returned to Kentucky for a visit, and he deeded that 100 acres, over to Elizabeth, on August 9, 1823. It was probably his way of apologizing to her for getting her pregnant. The two witnesses to that deed were John Back (1774-1853) and his wife Catherine Robertson, and they certified the transaction in 1825. That deed is attached to this memorial.

On December 10, 1831, Elizabeth deeded that 100 acres, over to her husband Lewis Back. They were both living there, and she just wanted the property in his name. That deed is also attached to this memorial. That deed was witnessed by Samuel Maggard (1774-1855), who was the longtime best friend of John Back (1774-1853), who was the cousin and close friend of Elizabeth's husband Lewis Back. Other witnesses were Rudolph Maggard (1799-1876), who was a son of Samuel Maggard (1774-1855); William Jenkins, who was probably William "Old Billy" Jenkins (1783-1842), who was probably a friend of Lewis and Elizabeth; Henry Back (1785-1871), who was a brother to John Back (1774-1853); and Henry's wife Susannah Maggard Back, who was a daughter of Samuel Maggard (1774-1855), and a sister of Rudolph Maggard.

In 1850, Lewis and his wife Elizabeth, and their two daughters (Rebecca and Katherine), and their daughters' husbands, migrated out to the Ozark Mountains. It is not believed that Elizabeth's illegitimate daughter Elizabeth went with them. She apparently got married in Harlan County and remained there.

On November 10, 1858, Elizabeth Pennington Back bought 80 acres in McDonald County, Missouri. (Her husband Lewis Back must have been in very bad health by then, because he didn't buy it.) They lived near the town of Honey Creek. Lewis and Elizabeth died there, sometime between 1860 and 1870.

Back in the 1990s, someone from "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" had found that December 10, 1831 deed, in which Elizabeth Pennington Back deeded her 100 acres (that Andrew Cope had given to her), over to her husband Lewis Back. The "Back-Bach people" decided to use that deed, to create an estimated date of death on the fraudulent gravestone that they had created and erected in the Maggard Cemetery for Elizabeth Hoffman Back (another woman!) They had inscribed on that gravestone that Elizabeth Hoffman Back had died "after Dec. 12. 1831," meaning sometime after the date on that deed. They also claimed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (another woman!) had signed that deed, to deed 100 acres to her son Lewis Back! It was absolutely ridiculous! But they couldn't even get the date right. The date on that deed was Dec. 10th, not Dec. 12th! Their fraudulent genealogy was so full of errors and typos, it's no wonder that they didn't even notice their sloppy mistake.

Elizabeth Hoffman Back, the wife of Henry Back (1743-1809), never moved to Kentucky. After Henry died, she moved to Rockingham County, Virginia, to live next to her widowed sister Margaret. This has been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, by her being in the 1810 Census Report in Rockingham County, by her being in the 1810-1815 Tax Lists in Rockingham County, and by the 1816 land deed, in which her son Aaron sold her 50 acres in Rockingham County. That 1816 deed described how Aaron had bought that land for her, back in April of 1809.

DO NOT MERGE THIS MEMORIAL WITH ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. IT IS NOT A DUPLICATE OF ANY OTHER MEMORIAL. DEVIOUS PEOPLE KEEP TRYING TO STEAL MY MEMORIALS, BUT THE MANAGERS AT FINDAGRAVE HAVE STOPPED IT, AND THEY WILL CONTINUE TO STOP IT. THE GENEALOGY SHOWN HERE IS ACCURATE & PROVEN…PLEASE STOP TRYING TO DESTROY IT.

The people who still peddle the fraudulent genealogy of the Back (Bach) family either do not know who this woman is, or they purposefully ignore her. They claim that her married name (Elizabeth Back), on two land deeds (in 1823 and 1831), and in the 1815 Tax List, is Elizabeth (Hoffman) Back, the wife of Henry Back (1743-1809), in their bizarre attempts to "prove" that Elizabeth (Hoffman) Back lived in southeastern Kentucky!

This woman, Elizabeth Pennington Back, was the daughter of Abel Pennington and his wife Christina (whose first husband may have been Barnabas Roark). But Christina had died, when Elizabeth was young. Elizabeth Pennington was born in South Carolina. In 1804, when she was nine years old, she, her father, and her siblings, migrated to southeastern Kentucky, and they settled along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

In 1809, when she was just 14 years old, Elizabeth Pennington had an affair with Andrew Cope, who lived down the road. She got pregnant and she gave birth to a little girl she named Elizabeth, in 1810. The problem was…Andrew Cope was married, and he had three children, and so there was quite a scandal.

Shortly after that little girl was born, Andrew Cope and his family left Kentucky, because of the scandal and embarrassment. But he said that Elizabeth could live on 100 acres of his land, along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

Meanwhile, over in Virginia, Lewis Back (1787-1865), the son of Henry Back (1743-1809) and Elizabeth Hoffman Back (1746-1816, the daughter of John Hoffman and Maria Sabina Folg), had left his home in Madison County, Virginia, after his father had died in 1809, and he moved down to Russell County, Virginia, to live with his cousin John Back (1774-1853) and his wife Catherine Robertson. *****The father of Lewis Back (1787-1865) was Henry Back (1743-1809), who was a brother to Joseph Back (1745-1819), who was the father of John Back (1774-1853), who married Catherine Robertson. That makes Lewis Back (1787-1865) a cousin of John Back (1774-1853).

When John Back, his wife Catherine, and their children, left Russell County, Virginia, in the fall of 1810, and moved to southeastern Kentucky, Lewis Back went with them. They also settled along the Poor Fork of the Cumberland River.

Elizabeth Pennington soon met Lewis Back. They got married on June 22, 1812. Lewis then adopted Elizabeth's little, illegitimate daughter, and he raised her as his own.

In 1815, Elizabeth was seen in the Tax List, in Knox County, KY, still living on that 100 acres that Andrew Cope had let her live on, and so Andrew Cope's name was seen in the far right column as owning that land. Elizabeth's husband, Lewis Back, was listed next to her. So, Lewis was living with Elizabeth, on that 100 acres of land that Andrew Cope had let Elizabeth live on,

Also seen on that 1815 Tax List were Lewis' two cousins, John Back (1774-1853) and his brother Henry Back (1785-1871). John and Henry's father, Joseph Back (1745-1819), was a brother to Lewis' father Henry Back (1743-1809). At that time, in 1815, John Back was sharecropping 175 acres that was owned by Thomas Robertson, who was the brother of his wife Catherine Robertson. Mr. Robertson's name was seen in the far right column as owning that land. John back later bought that land from Mr. Robertson, on 11-17-1817. That 1815 Tax List is attached to this memorial.

In the summer of 1823, Andrew Cope returned to Kentucky for a visit, and he deeded that 100 acres, over to Elizabeth, on August 9, 1823. It was probably his way of apologizing to her for getting her pregnant. The two witnesses to that deed were John Back (1774-1853) and his wife Catherine Robertson, and they certified the transaction in 1825. That deed is attached to this memorial.

On December 10, 1831, Elizabeth deeded that 100 acres, over to her husband Lewis Back. They were both living there, and she just wanted the property in his name. That deed is also attached to this memorial. That deed was witnessed by Samuel Maggard (1774-1855), who was the longtime best friend of John Back (1774-1853), who was the cousin and close friend of Elizabeth's husband Lewis Back. Other witnesses were Rudolph Maggard (1799-1876), who was a son of Samuel Maggard (1774-1855); William Jenkins, who was probably William "Old Billy" Jenkins (1783-1842), who was probably a friend of Lewis and Elizabeth; Henry Back (1785-1871), who was a brother to John Back (1774-1853); and Henry's wife Susannah Maggard Back, who was a daughter of Samuel Maggard (1774-1855), and a sister of Rudolph Maggard.

In 1850, Lewis and his wife Elizabeth, and their two daughters (Rebecca and Katherine), and their daughters' husbands, migrated out to the Ozark Mountains. It is not believed that Elizabeth's illegitimate daughter Elizabeth went with them. She apparently got married in Harlan County and remained there.

On November 10, 1858, Elizabeth Pennington Back bought 80 acres in McDonald County, Missouri. (Her husband Lewis Back must have been in very bad health by then, because he didn't buy it.) They lived near the town of Honey Creek. Lewis and Elizabeth died there, sometime between 1860 and 1870.

Back in the 1990s, someone from "The Back-Bach Genealogical Society" had found that December 10, 1831 deed, in which Elizabeth Pennington Back deeded her 100 acres (that Andrew Cope had given to her), over to her husband Lewis Back. The "Back-Bach people" decided to use that deed, to create an estimated date of death on the fraudulent gravestone that they had created and erected in the Maggard Cemetery for Elizabeth Hoffman Back (another woman!) They had inscribed on that gravestone that Elizabeth Hoffman Back had died "after Dec. 12. 1831," meaning sometime after the date on that deed. They also claimed that Elizabeth Hoffman Back (another woman!) had signed that deed, to deed 100 acres to her son Lewis Back! It was absolutely ridiculous! But they couldn't even get the date right. The date on that deed was Dec. 10th, not Dec. 12th! Their fraudulent genealogy was so full of errors and typos, it's no wonder that they didn't even notice their sloppy mistake.

Elizabeth Hoffman Back, the wife of Henry Back (1743-1809), never moved to Kentucky. After Henry died, she moved to Rockingham County, Virginia, to live next to her widowed sister Margaret. This has been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, by her being in the 1810 Census Report in Rockingham County, by her being in the 1810-1815 Tax Lists in Rockingham County, and by the 1816 land deed, in which her son Aaron sold her 50 acres in Rockingham County. That 1816 deed described how Aaron had bought that land for her, back in April of 1809.


Family Members

Spouse
Children

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement

See more Back or Pennington memorials in:

Sponsor and Remove Ads

Advertisement