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Henry Kirke Brown

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Henry Kirke Brown

Birth
Leyden, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
10 Jul 1886 (aged 72)
Newburgh, Orange County, New York, USA
Burial
Burial Details Unknown Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Sculptor. He studied painting in Boston under Chester Harding while working part-time as a railroad engineer. After being in Italy from 1846-1849, Brown first became widely known in 1851 after sculpting a statue of Governor DeWitt Clinton in Brooklyn's Greenwich Cemetery. The same year, he was elected to the National Academy of Design in New York and in 1859, served on the National Art Commission. In 1856 he created a bronze equestrian statue of George Washington for New York City's Union Square. This would become one of his most famous works. Brown cast a statue of Abraham Lincoln for Union Square in New York, and he executed several statues and monuments for the nation's capital. These include statues of Nathanael Greene (1870), George Clinton (1873), Richard Stockton (1874), and Philip Kearny (1886) for National Statuary Hall in the Capitol building; an equestrian bronze of General Winfield Scott (1871) in Scott Circle; and an equestrian statue of General Nathanael Greene (1877) for Greene Square. His health began to fail in 1879, after the passing of his wife, and had to quit sculpting. He died on July 10, 1886 at his home in Newburgh. He was buried beside his wife on his own pleasant grounds on the Hudson.
Sculptor. He studied painting in Boston under Chester Harding while working part-time as a railroad engineer. After being in Italy from 1846-1849, Brown first became widely known in 1851 after sculpting a statue of Governor DeWitt Clinton in Brooklyn's Greenwich Cemetery. The same year, he was elected to the National Academy of Design in New York and in 1859, served on the National Art Commission. In 1856 he created a bronze equestrian statue of George Washington for New York City's Union Square. This would become one of his most famous works. Brown cast a statue of Abraham Lincoln for Union Square in New York, and he executed several statues and monuments for the nation's capital. These include statues of Nathanael Greene (1870), George Clinton (1873), Richard Stockton (1874), and Philip Kearny (1886) for National Statuary Hall in the Capitol building; an equestrian bronze of General Winfield Scott (1871) in Scott Circle; and an equestrian statue of General Nathanael Greene (1877) for Greene Square. His health began to fail in 1879, after the passing of his wife, and had to quit sculpting. He died on July 10, 1886 at his home in Newburgh. He was buried beside his wife on his own pleasant grounds on the Hudson.

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