Advertisement

Charlotte Ann <I>Seymour</I> Clark

Advertisement

Charlotte Ann Seymour Clark

Birth
Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA
Death
13 Jul 1873 (aged 78)
Colorado Springs, El Paso County, Colorado, USA
Burial
Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section 45 Lot 9
Memorial ID
View Source
Cenotaph here
~~~~
She married Nathan Clark* (or Clarke) on May 23, 1816 in Connecticut. They had four children, three girls and one boy.

Magazine of Western History, Volume 8, page 174:
The wives of Captain Gooding and of Lieutenant Nathan Clark* had dared the hardships of the wilderness and accompanied their husbands. Charlotte Clark was the daughter of Thomas Seymour, a lawyer in Hartford, Connecticut, accustomed to the best people and influences of that old place, and her grandmother was the sister of Colonel William Ledyard, the heroic commander who lost his life at Fort Griswold during the War of the Revolution, and to whose memory a monument stands at New London, Connecticut.

Scarcely had the troops reached the mouth of the Ouisconsin river, as Wisconsin was then written, when Mrs. Clark gave birth to a girl. The officers were attached to the gentle and refined wife who had maintained cheerfulness amid discouragements, and learning that the babe's first name was to be that of the mother, Charlotte, asked to give her a middle name, Ouisconsin, which was accepted. The babe still lives, a resident of the city of Minneapolis, the honored wife of a modest soldier, a graduate of West Point, who commanded the Second Minnesota regiment of volunteers in the successful charge at Mill Springs, Kentucky, during the War for the Union, and was made brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers - Horatio P. Van Cleve.
----------
*Nathan Clark, a native of Connecticut, served in the War of 1812-15. He was commissioned, May, 1815, second lieutenant; March, 1817, first lieutenant; assistant commissary of subsistence, March, 1819; captain in June 1824, and died in February, 1836, at Fort Winnebago.

Her tombstone notes that she was born 10/19/1795 and died 7/13/1873 at Colorado Springs.
Cenotaph here
~~~~
She married Nathan Clark* (or Clarke) on May 23, 1816 in Connecticut. They had four children, three girls and one boy.

Magazine of Western History, Volume 8, page 174:
The wives of Captain Gooding and of Lieutenant Nathan Clark* had dared the hardships of the wilderness and accompanied their husbands. Charlotte Clark was the daughter of Thomas Seymour, a lawyer in Hartford, Connecticut, accustomed to the best people and influences of that old place, and her grandmother was the sister of Colonel William Ledyard, the heroic commander who lost his life at Fort Griswold during the War of the Revolution, and to whose memory a monument stands at New London, Connecticut.

Scarcely had the troops reached the mouth of the Ouisconsin river, as Wisconsin was then written, when Mrs. Clark gave birth to a girl. The officers were attached to the gentle and refined wife who had maintained cheerfulness amid discouragements, and learning that the babe's first name was to be that of the mother, Charlotte, asked to give her a middle name, Ouisconsin, which was accepted. The babe still lives, a resident of the city of Minneapolis, the honored wife of a modest soldier, a graduate of West Point, who commanded the Second Minnesota regiment of volunteers in the successful charge at Mill Springs, Kentucky, during the War for the Union, and was made brigadier-general and major-general of volunteers - Horatio P. Van Cleve.
----------
*Nathan Clark, a native of Connecticut, served in the War of 1812-15. He was commissioned, May, 1815, second lieutenant; March, 1817, first lieutenant; assistant commissary of subsistence, March, 1819; captain in June 1824, and died in February, 1836, at Fort Winnebago.

Her tombstone notes that she was born 10/19/1795 and died 7/13/1873 at Colorado Springs.


Advertisement