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Ann <I>Atkins</I> Goodrich

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Ann Atkins Goodrich

Birth
Amherst, Erie County, New York, USA
Death
4 Jun 1890 (aged 68)
Tuscola County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Goodrich, Genesee County, Michigan, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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Biography:

MRS. ENOS GOODRICH

Ann Atkins Goodrich was the daughter of Ralph C. Atkins and his consort Lusabra Bush, and was born in the town of Amherst, County of Erie, State of New York, February 15, 1822. In consequence of the death of her mother in her early infancy she was placed in charge of her aunt, Wealthy Atkins, whose husband kept the Cold Spring hotel just on the eastern borders of Buffalo. Here she received a limited school education, with the best of instruction in household duties.

In the autumn of 1836 her father having married a second wife, removed to the then wilds of Michigan while it was yet a territory. Here for a time, she was placed in charge of another aunt, who was the wife of Hon. Thomas Drake, then residing in Flint. Mr. Drake was at that time, an Indian trader, and it was here she witnessed the terrible epidemic of small-pox which swept away 50 percent of the Indian population.

Returning to the town of Atlas, where her father had settled, she was on the 26th day of June, 1838, married to Enos Goodrich. About this time Mr. Goodrich formed a copartnership with his brother Reuben and entered upon that series of mill-building and other improvements which culminated in the building up of the village of Goodrich. This was work that required strong hands and stout hearts. The superintendence of a large boarding-house devolved upon her, in the discharge of which duty she exhibited a degree of dexterity and masterly energy seldom if ever witnessed in women of riper years. In this work she continued in concert with her husband and his brother Reuben nearly twenty years, at which time the village was transacting far more business than it ever did before or since. Financial reverses terminated the business career of the firm of E. & R. Goodrich, and she retired with her husband to the wilds of Tuscola County, once more to try her fortunes in the settlement of another new country.

Leaving her old home and kindred and the comforts of civilized life, she cheerfully submitted to the toils and privations incident to her new station; but her health finally gave way under the pressure of her arduous duties. Still side by and hand in hand with her husband, she toiled on with superhuman energy, until their labors were rewarded with one of the finest homes in their adopted county. But it was her sad fortune to become the victim of disease, which marred the enjoyment of the fruits of their labors. Still she stood boldly at her post, cheerfully and resolutely battling with her destiny, while suffering from a complication of diseases, until her woodland home under her persevering hand had become to her an earthly paradise.

Yearly as the vernal season returned her weary heart was delighted at the blooming of her garden, and the expanding and symmetrical growth of the shrubbery she had planted. But her physical debilities had become greatly aggravated from an attack of the epidemic influenza, which was so prevalent throughout the country. It was with tottering steps that she daily hied her to the garden, and when she returned to the quiet of her room her favorite Bible was her daily and constant companion until by repeated reading from Genesis to Revelations she left her pencil marks upon her favorite passages. It was when the early blossoms had begun to fade that the angel of death, in the form of heart disease, gently and calmly and sweetly wafted her spirit away to the realms of the great unknown. At ten minutes before one o'clock on the balmy and moonlight morning of the 4th of June, 1890, she calmly breathed away her spirit in the embraces of her husband and only son.

Coming to Michigan almost 54 years ago, she had seen the State grow up around her, and had shown by her example how efficient may be the labors of woman in the building of States. She leaves a bereaved husband, a son, Enos H. Goodrich, and a daughter, Mrs. Jeremiah Narrin, and a host of more remote kindred and sympathizing friends to mourn their irreparable loss.

Her funeral was held at the home of her daughter near Goodrich and on Friday, June 6, 1890, her remains were deposited among the graves of many near and dear friends who had gone before.

(Tuscola Pioneer and Historical Collections, Pioneer Society Vol. 17, 1890, Tuscola County.)

Biography:

MRS. ENOS GOODRICH

Ann Atkins Goodrich was the daughter of Ralph C. Atkins and his consort Lusabra Bush, and was born in the town of Amherst, County of Erie, State of New York, February 15, 1822. In consequence of the death of her mother in her early infancy she was placed in charge of her aunt, Wealthy Atkins, whose husband kept the Cold Spring hotel just on the eastern borders of Buffalo. Here she received a limited school education, with the best of instruction in household duties.

In the autumn of 1836 her father having married a second wife, removed to the then wilds of Michigan while it was yet a territory. Here for a time, she was placed in charge of another aunt, who was the wife of Hon. Thomas Drake, then residing in Flint. Mr. Drake was at that time, an Indian trader, and it was here she witnessed the terrible epidemic of small-pox which swept away 50 percent of the Indian population.

Returning to the town of Atlas, where her father had settled, she was on the 26th day of June, 1838, married to Enos Goodrich. About this time Mr. Goodrich formed a copartnership with his brother Reuben and entered upon that series of mill-building and other improvements which culminated in the building up of the village of Goodrich. This was work that required strong hands and stout hearts. The superintendence of a large boarding-house devolved upon her, in the discharge of which duty she exhibited a degree of dexterity and masterly energy seldom if ever witnessed in women of riper years. In this work she continued in concert with her husband and his brother Reuben nearly twenty years, at which time the village was transacting far more business than it ever did before or since. Financial reverses terminated the business career of the firm of E. & R. Goodrich, and she retired with her husband to the wilds of Tuscola County, once more to try her fortunes in the settlement of another new country.

Leaving her old home and kindred and the comforts of civilized life, she cheerfully submitted to the toils and privations incident to her new station; but her health finally gave way under the pressure of her arduous duties. Still side by and hand in hand with her husband, she toiled on with superhuman energy, until their labors were rewarded with one of the finest homes in their adopted county. But it was her sad fortune to become the victim of disease, which marred the enjoyment of the fruits of their labors. Still she stood boldly at her post, cheerfully and resolutely battling with her destiny, while suffering from a complication of diseases, until her woodland home under her persevering hand had become to her an earthly paradise.

Yearly as the vernal season returned her weary heart was delighted at the blooming of her garden, and the expanding and symmetrical growth of the shrubbery she had planted. But her physical debilities had become greatly aggravated from an attack of the epidemic influenza, which was so prevalent throughout the country. It was with tottering steps that she daily hied her to the garden, and when she returned to the quiet of her room her favorite Bible was her daily and constant companion until by repeated reading from Genesis to Revelations she left her pencil marks upon her favorite passages. It was when the early blossoms had begun to fade that the angel of death, in the form of heart disease, gently and calmly and sweetly wafted her spirit away to the realms of the great unknown. At ten minutes before one o'clock on the balmy and moonlight morning of the 4th of June, 1890, she calmly breathed away her spirit in the embraces of her husband and only son.

Coming to Michigan almost 54 years ago, she had seen the State grow up around her, and had shown by her example how efficient may be the labors of woman in the building of States. She leaves a bereaved husband, a son, Enos H. Goodrich, and a daughter, Mrs. Jeremiah Narrin, and a host of more remote kindred and sympathizing friends to mourn their irreparable loss.

Her funeral was held at the home of her daughter near Goodrich and on Friday, June 6, 1890, her remains were deposited among the graves of many near and dear friends who had gone before.

(Tuscola Pioneer and Historical Collections, Pioneer Society Vol. 17, 1890, Tuscola County.)


Inscription


ENOS GOODRICH
BORN
AUG. 11, 1813
DIED
SEPT. 16, 1897

ANN A. GOODRICH
BORN
FEB. 15, 1822
DIED
JUNE 4, 1890



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