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Judge Enos Goodrich

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Judge Enos Goodrich

Birth
Sempronius, Cayuga County, New York, USA
Death
16 Sep 1897 (aged 84)
Fostoria, Tuscola County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Goodrich, Genesee County, Michigan, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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"At the Cemetery" by Enos Goodrich, Friday May 21, 1886
Just outside of and immediately skirting the northern borders of the neat and quiet town of Goodrich lies the cemetery, which has now become the resting place of the majority of the older pioneers of the neighborhood. It was originally started upon two acres of ground, donated by Enos and Reuben Goodrich; but has since been enlarged, by additions, first upon the east side and then upon the west, and is now ample to meet the growing wants of the place. It is bounded on the north and east by the Kearsley creek, on the south by the village and on the west by fields and farm improvements, upon which was many years ago the home of Nathaniel Fairchild, an early pioneer of Atlas, who was a neighbor of the Goodrich family in Western New York, and whose remains were the first to be deposited in the cemetery. The soil is a light gravelly loam, and was in the state of nature a combination of oak opening and brush land.
It was crossing this piece of ground in June, 1836, that Moses Goodrich and the writer, Enos, startled and old bear and her three half-grown cubs upon the banks of the stream, and by rushing suddenly upon them, treed the cubs, but the old bear escaped. It was a dilemma, as we had no weapon but an axe, but it was soon settled by agreement that Moses should go back to the farm house for a gun, while the writer guarded the bears. There, beneath the elms of the creek flats, armed with the aforesaid axe, and accompanied by a small dog and several millions of mosquitoes, the writer stood guard, until Moses returned, accompanied by brother Levi and two good rifles. A few shots from one of the rifles soon brought down the young bears, but the mother after having been twice beaten back by the writer, with axe in hand, prudently declined to return to the scene of action, and we went home mortified that we had not made the victory complete.
Such are the present surroundings of the Goodrich cemetery, where the kindred pensively convened to complete their reunion. There, surrounded by the mossy grave stones of many a veteran pioneer, repose the advance guard of the Goodrich family, who have gone before. Scarcely could a funeral have been more solemn. Indeed it was an aggregation of many funerals in the past, and a foreshadowing of many more, that are yet, we know not how soon, to come. It would have been an impressive scene of the pencil of a Hogarth as a Rembrandt, to have pictured the kindred, as they strolled in pensive groups along the walks, or halted over the green mounds that contain the dust of those they had love and lost.
Some might have been seen, arm in arm, along the more sequestered walks, conversing in deep emotion and tearful eyes, or a solitary individual resting his head upon a grave stone wet with tear, as the well-springs of memory brought back the images of the past. It is not for human pen to chronicle the deep thought of that sentimental hour. It was with lingering look and pensive tread, on that bright May morning, the living finally and reluctantly parted with the dead.
"At the Cemetery" by Enos Goodrich, Friday May 21, 1886
Just outside of and immediately skirting the northern borders of the neat and quiet town of Goodrich lies the cemetery, which has now become the resting place of the majority of the older pioneers of the neighborhood. It was originally started upon two acres of ground, donated by Enos and Reuben Goodrich; but has since been enlarged, by additions, first upon the east side and then upon the west, and is now ample to meet the growing wants of the place. It is bounded on the north and east by the Kearsley creek, on the south by the village and on the west by fields and farm improvements, upon which was many years ago the home of Nathaniel Fairchild, an early pioneer of Atlas, who was a neighbor of the Goodrich family in Western New York, and whose remains were the first to be deposited in the cemetery. The soil is a light gravelly loam, and was in the state of nature a combination of oak opening and brush land.
It was crossing this piece of ground in June, 1836, that Moses Goodrich and the writer, Enos, startled and old bear and her three half-grown cubs upon the banks of the stream, and by rushing suddenly upon them, treed the cubs, but the old bear escaped. It was a dilemma, as we had no weapon but an axe, but it was soon settled by agreement that Moses should go back to the farm house for a gun, while the writer guarded the bears. There, beneath the elms of the creek flats, armed with the aforesaid axe, and accompanied by a small dog and several millions of mosquitoes, the writer stood guard, until Moses returned, accompanied by brother Levi and two good rifles. A few shots from one of the rifles soon brought down the young bears, but the mother after having been twice beaten back by the writer, with axe in hand, prudently declined to return to the scene of action, and we went home mortified that we had not made the victory complete.
Such are the present surroundings of the Goodrich cemetery, where the kindred pensively convened to complete their reunion. There, surrounded by the mossy grave stones of many a veteran pioneer, repose the advance guard of the Goodrich family, who have gone before. Scarcely could a funeral have been more solemn. Indeed it was an aggregation of many funerals in the past, and a foreshadowing of many more, that are yet, we know not how soon, to come. It would have been an impressive scene of the pencil of a Hogarth as a Rembrandt, to have pictured the kindred, as they strolled in pensive groups along the walks, or halted over the green mounds that contain the dust of those they had love and lost.
Some might have been seen, arm in arm, along the more sequestered walks, conversing in deep emotion and tearful eyes, or a solitary individual resting his head upon a grave stone wet with tear, as the well-springs of memory brought back the images of the past. It is not for human pen to chronicle the deep thought of that sentimental hour. It was with lingering look and pensive tread, on that bright May morning, the living finally and reluctantly parted with the dead.

Inscription

Husband of Ann A. Goodrich.



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  • Maintained by: Marguerite
  • Originally Created by: Lori War
  • Added: Oct 29, 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/16367911/enos-goodrich: accessed ), memorial page for Judge Enos Goodrich (11 Aug 1813–16 Sep 1897), Find a Grave Memorial ID 16367911, citing Goodrich Cemetery, Goodrich, Genesee County, Michigan, USA; Maintained by Marguerite (contributor 48040627).