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Barney Joseph Sablotny

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Barney Joseph Sablotny

Birth
Germany
Death
3 May 1938 (aged 46)
USA
Burial
Gary, Lake County, Indiana, USA GPS-Latitude: 41.54615, Longitude: -87.3930167
Memorial ID
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BARNEY JOSEPH SABLOTNY. In the career of Barney J. Sablotny, president of the Gary Paper & Supply Company, of Gary, there is to be found something of an encouraging character for the youth of any lad who feels himself handicapped by lack of education, finances or friends. Mr. Sablotny, a poor German immigrant boy, began his independent life in the coal mines of Illinois at the tender age of twelve years. Many in these circumstances would never have emerged from obscurity, but such has been Mr. Sablotny's determination, spirit and ability that he has risen steadily to become one of Gary's leading and influential citizens, a force in business, political, social and fraternal circles.
Barney J. Sablotny was born at Stephansdorf, Germany, May 5, 1891, and is a son of Anthony and Frances Sablotny, natives of Germany. Anthony Sablotny, who passed his entire career as a farmer; was wounded in the knee during the Franco-Prussian war, and was a partial invalid all of his life, dying in 1902. By his first wife he was the father of two sons: William, deceased; and Leon, a retired manufacturer of Chicago, Illinois. By his second wife he had six children: Louis, at one time a member of the Uhlans, a crack regiment of the Germany army, who died shortly after the World War, from the effects of his military services, and is buried at Stephansdorf, Germany; Valerie, now Mrs. Kamasa, of Germany, whose son, Joseph, was captain of a German ship during the World War and is now director-general of education of Poland; Frank and Frances, who are residents of Chicago; Barney J., of this review; and Joseph, of Chicago. After the death of her husband, in 1902, the mother of Barney J. Sablotny immigrated to the United States and first settled at Spring Valley, in the coal region of Illinois, but later moved to Chicago, where she spent the remainder of her life and died in 1913, being buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery.

Barney J. Sablotny attended public school in Germany from the time he was six years of age until he was about twelve, when he was brought to the United States by his mother and immediately went to work in a coal mine at Spring Valley, Illinois. That he was a precious and somewhat unusual lad is seen in the fact that he had become such an influence by the time that he was fifteen years of age that he was elected a representative of the United Mine Workers of America under Pers. John J. Mitchell, and served in that capacity for a period of three years. In 1908 he moved to Chicago, where he secured a position as fireman on the Nickel Plate Railroad, and likewise served as safety director and as representative of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen. After about seven years he left railroading to engage in the retail grocery and meat business at Chicago, continuing in this line until 1917, when he accepted a position with the Tapajna Paper Company as salesman, an din 1919 took charge of the business at Gary, where he has since made his home and where he increased the sales of the company materially, making it one of the important enterprises of the city. On November 15, 1930, he severed his connection with the Tapajna Paper Company and formed the Gary Paper & Supply Company, of which he is the president and principal stockholder. Mr. Sablotny's interests have increased amazingly and have spread out in every direction. He is a member of the advisory board of the Salvation Army; a director of the Glen Park Building & Loan Association; helped organize the Lions Club of Gary, of which he is an officer; is a member of the Gary Commercial Club and Chamber of Commerce; a member of the Glen Park Republican Club, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Glen Park Boosters Association, the Lincoln Hills Country Club and other organizations, and has been active in the Izaak Walton League. He is an enthusiastic football fan, and during the season attends all of the big games that he can possibly reach. In politics he is a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and his religious affiliation is with the Forty-third Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.

At Knox, Indiana, August 8, 1914, Mr. Sablotny was united in marriage with Miss Esther Zerena Garner, daughter of Henery William and Mattie Marilda Hepner Garner, of Gary, who make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Sablotny, Mr. Garner being a retired carpenter and a veteran of the Spanish-American War. Mrs. Sablotny, who graduated from Knox High School, is active in community life, a worker in the Methodist Church, and a member of the Parent-Teachers Association of Glen Park and the various women's clubs of the city. To Mr. and Mrs. Sablotny there have been born two children: Dorothy Marie and William Robert, both born at Chicago, the former of whom is in her second year at the Lew Wallace High School, and the latter in his first year in the same school at Gary.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931

Due to the defeat of Germany in World War I, his place of birth is now in Poland. Therefore, information may also state that Mr. Slabotny was born in Poland, but it was Germany during the time of his birth.




Barney Joseph Sablotny, first occupant of the Colonial Revival house at 501 W. 47th Avenue. It was built by master brick mason and builder John Largura, an Italian immigrant in 1927 and sold to Mr. Sablotny on 28 March 1928 for $10,000.00.

Barney J. Sablotny was another immigrant who found success in early Gary. Born in Germany in 1891 he immigrated with
his mother and siblings to the United States in 1902, soon after his father's death.
Sablotny lived on the south side of Chicago working for the railroad and then in the retail grocery business before becoming as a salesman for the Tapajna Paper Company of Gary in 1917. He moved to Gary in 1921 when he accepted the position as the company manager. It was in 1928, while he was in this position at Tapajna, that he bought the house at 501 West 47th Avenue in Gary. He left Tapajna to form his own company, the Gary Paper and Supply Company, in 1930. The Abstract of Title indicates that the next few years were financially tough on Mr. Sablotny. It shows a foreclosure action taken against the Sablotnys on April 27,1936 by the Lincoln National Life Insurance Company of Ft. Wayne against Barney and his wife. On August 4, 1937 the courts found in favor of Lincoln National Life in the sum of $12,034.71. This was for more than the original price paid to Largura when he bought the house in 1928 indicating that he had re-mortgaged possibly to leverage his own business venture. Lincoln National Life put the house up for sale in the Lake County newspapers in February 1938.
Sablotny died less than three months later with his residence still listed at this address. It has been sold to the current owners that Mrs. Sablotny was allowed to live there until the house was sold to Judge Charles Gannon in May 1940.
Judge Charles W. Gannon and his wife, Ethel, purchased the property on May 17, 1940. He paid $10,000.00 for the property ($6500 in cash and a house which he owned at 3701 Jackson in Gary assessed at $3500). Gannon was a former Lake County Prosecuting Attorney, Lake County's first Juvenile Court Judge.
In 1946, while residing in the house, he ran for a seat in the 80th United States Congress loosing to incumbent Ray. J. Madden. The Gannons remained in the house until c.1961 when they sold the property to Jack and Lillian Shadwell. Mr. Shadwell was an Allstate Insurance agent. They remained in the house until 1987 when they sold to the present owners, Ronald and Betty Hamlin.
Today the Sablotny House retains its historic appearance and is an excellent example of the use of eclectic applications
of the Colonial Revival style in architecture in both its interior and exterior attributes. Though in a primarily working class neighborhood, the house reflects the status of its several upwardly moving occupants within the city of Gary during its golden era of development and growth. For these reasons the house should be placed upon the National Register of Historic Places.

Gregg Abell, Partners in Preservation, Inc., December 13, 2010.
BARNEY JOSEPH SABLOTNY. In the career of Barney J. Sablotny, president of the Gary Paper & Supply Company, of Gary, there is to be found something of an encouraging character for the youth of any lad who feels himself handicapped by lack of education, finances or friends. Mr. Sablotny, a poor German immigrant boy, began his independent life in the coal mines of Illinois at the tender age of twelve years. Many in these circumstances would never have emerged from obscurity, but such has been Mr. Sablotny's determination, spirit and ability that he has risen steadily to become one of Gary's leading and influential citizens, a force in business, political, social and fraternal circles.
Barney J. Sablotny was born at Stephansdorf, Germany, May 5, 1891, and is a son of Anthony and Frances Sablotny, natives of Germany. Anthony Sablotny, who passed his entire career as a farmer; was wounded in the knee during the Franco-Prussian war, and was a partial invalid all of his life, dying in 1902. By his first wife he was the father of two sons: William, deceased; and Leon, a retired manufacturer of Chicago, Illinois. By his second wife he had six children: Louis, at one time a member of the Uhlans, a crack regiment of the Germany army, who died shortly after the World War, from the effects of his military services, and is buried at Stephansdorf, Germany; Valerie, now Mrs. Kamasa, of Germany, whose son, Joseph, was captain of a German ship during the World War and is now director-general of education of Poland; Frank and Frances, who are residents of Chicago; Barney J., of this review; and Joseph, of Chicago. After the death of her husband, in 1902, the mother of Barney J. Sablotny immigrated to the United States and first settled at Spring Valley, in the coal region of Illinois, but later moved to Chicago, where she spent the remainder of her life and died in 1913, being buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery.

Barney J. Sablotny attended public school in Germany from the time he was six years of age until he was about twelve, when he was brought to the United States by his mother and immediately went to work in a coal mine at Spring Valley, Illinois. That he was a precious and somewhat unusual lad is seen in the fact that he had become such an influence by the time that he was fifteen years of age that he was elected a representative of the United Mine Workers of America under Pers. John J. Mitchell, and served in that capacity for a period of three years. In 1908 he moved to Chicago, where he secured a position as fireman on the Nickel Plate Railroad, and likewise served as safety director and as representative of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen. After about seven years he left railroading to engage in the retail grocery and meat business at Chicago, continuing in this line until 1917, when he accepted a position with the Tapajna Paper Company as salesman, an din 1919 took charge of the business at Gary, where he has since made his home and where he increased the sales of the company materially, making it one of the important enterprises of the city. On November 15, 1930, he severed his connection with the Tapajna Paper Company and formed the Gary Paper & Supply Company, of which he is the president and principal stockholder. Mr. Sablotny's interests have increased amazingly and have spread out in every direction. He is a member of the advisory board of the Salvation Army; a director of the Glen Park Building & Loan Association; helped organize the Lions Club of Gary, of which he is an officer; is a member of the Gary Commercial Club and Chamber of Commerce; a member of the Glen Park Republican Club, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Glen Park Boosters Association, the Lincoln Hills Country Club and other organizations, and has been active in the Izaak Walton League. He is an enthusiastic football fan, and during the season attends all of the big games that he can possibly reach. In politics he is a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and his religious affiliation is with the Forty-third Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.

At Knox, Indiana, August 8, 1914, Mr. Sablotny was united in marriage with Miss Esther Zerena Garner, daughter of Henery William and Mattie Marilda Hepner Garner, of Gary, who make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Sablotny, Mr. Garner being a retired carpenter and a veteran of the Spanish-American War. Mrs. Sablotny, who graduated from Knox High School, is active in community life, a worker in the Methodist Church, and a member of the Parent-Teachers Association of Glen Park and the various women's clubs of the city. To Mr. and Mrs. Sablotny there have been born two children: Dorothy Marie and William Robert, both born at Chicago, the former of whom is in her second year at the Lew Wallace High School, and the latter in his first year in the same school at Gary.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931

Due to the defeat of Germany in World War I, his place of birth is now in Poland. Therefore, information may also state that Mr. Slabotny was born in Poland, but it was Germany during the time of his birth.




Barney Joseph Sablotny, first occupant of the Colonial Revival house at 501 W. 47th Avenue. It was built by master brick mason and builder John Largura, an Italian immigrant in 1927 and sold to Mr. Sablotny on 28 March 1928 for $10,000.00.

Barney J. Sablotny was another immigrant who found success in early Gary. Born in Germany in 1891 he immigrated with
his mother and siblings to the United States in 1902, soon after his father's death.
Sablotny lived on the south side of Chicago working for the railroad and then in the retail grocery business before becoming as a salesman for the Tapajna Paper Company of Gary in 1917. He moved to Gary in 1921 when he accepted the position as the company manager. It was in 1928, while he was in this position at Tapajna, that he bought the house at 501 West 47th Avenue in Gary. He left Tapajna to form his own company, the Gary Paper and Supply Company, in 1930. The Abstract of Title indicates that the next few years were financially tough on Mr. Sablotny. It shows a foreclosure action taken against the Sablotnys on April 27,1936 by the Lincoln National Life Insurance Company of Ft. Wayne against Barney and his wife. On August 4, 1937 the courts found in favor of Lincoln National Life in the sum of $12,034.71. This was for more than the original price paid to Largura when he bought the house in 1928 indicating that he had re-mortgaged possibly to leverage his own business venture. Lincoln National Life put the house up for sale in the Lake County newspapers in February 1938.
Sablotny died less than three months later with his residence still listed at this address. It has been sold to the current owners that Mrs. Sablotny was allowed to live there until the house was sold to Judge Charles Gannon in May 1940.
Judge Charles W. Gannon and his wife, Ethel, purchased the property on May 17, 1940. He paid $10,000.00 for the property ($6500 in cash and a house which he owned at 3701 Jackson in Gary assessed at $3500). Gannon was a former Lake County Prosecuting Attorney, Lake County's first Juvenile Court Judge.
In 1946, while residing in the house, he ran for a seat in the 80th United States Congress loosing to incumbent Ray. J. Madden. The Gannons remained in the house until c.1961 when they sold the property to Jack and Lillian Shadwell. Mr. Shadwell was an Allstate Insurance agent. They remained in the house until 1987 when they sold to the present owners, Ronald and Betty Hamlin.
Today the Sablotny House retains its historic appearance and is an excellent example of the use of eclectic applications
of the Colonial Revival style in architecture in both its interior and exterior attributes. Though in a primarily working class neighborhood, the house reflects the status of its several upwardly moving occupants within the city of Gary during its golden era of development and growth. For these reasons the house should be placed upon the National Register of Historic Places.

Gregg Abell, Partners in Preservation, Inc., December 13, 2010.

Bio by: supermama5



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