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COL Henry Beekman Livingston

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COL Henry Beekman Livingston

Birth
Death
5 Nov 1831 (aged 80)
Burial
Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, New York, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
The following information was compiled by Sarah K Hermans, Regent, Chancellor Livingston, NSDAR, May 2015 and published in "44 Patriots of the American Revolution interred in the Rhinebeck Reformed Church Cemetery". Provided by and used with permission of Sarah K Hermans

Henry Beekman Livingston

GRAVESTONE LOCATION:

Row 1, NONE—he is buried in what was the Livingston vault. His veteran marker is placed next to Robert J. Livingston's.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SERVICE:

LIEUTENANT COLONEL: Graham's Levies [NYRC+S p.79] and 2nd Reg't New York Line
COLONEL: 4th Reg't New York Line [NYRC+S p. 47]

DAR ANCESTOR NUMBER: Not in DAR database

GENEALOGY:

Henry Beekman Livingston was born November 9th, 1750 at Clermont to Judge Robert R. Livingston and Margaret Beekman. He was brother of Chancellor Robert R. Livingston, Janet Livingston (widow of Maj. Gen. Richard Montgomery), and Secretary of State Edward Livingston. He married March 14th, 1781 in Philadelphia Nancy Shippen (cousin to Benedict Arnold's wife—Arnold and Livingston were friends before the treason of 1780). Their only child Margaret "Peggy" Livingston was born December 26th, 1781 in Philadelphia. Peggy died unmarried leaving no one who (legitimately) descends from this Patriot.

He began his Revolutionary war career as a Captain, having raised a militia that drilled on the lawn of the Beekman Arms. He went as far as Montreal with his brother-in-law Richard Montgomery, but Montgomery sent him back to Albany after the city was taken. He felt great disdain for men in higher positions of power that he felt had lower social rank that he. He was a Colonel of the 4th New York Line at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777 and the Battle of Monmouth and the Battles of Rhode Island and Quaker Hill in 1778. Irritated that he wasn't getting promoted higher than colonel, he resigned his commission effective January 1779.

After this, he returned to Clermont and then to a house he inherited in Rhinebeck. Throughout his marriage to Nancy Shippen he was prone to extreme jealously and outrageous behavior that isolated him from his wife, child, siblings, and parents. Historian Geoff Benton summed up Henry Beekman Livingston perfectly when he said that "an ungoverable temper, surpassed only by a repugnant attitude, left him with an abbreviated military career, a spectacularly failed marriage and completely cut off from the rest of the Livingston's." You can read more about his dramatic personal life at clermontstatehistoricsite.blogspot.com. He died November 5th, 1831 "alone and unmourned."

I think you need to google this person. 1748 was birth year. Married twice. More.
The following information was compiled by Sarah K Hermans, Regent, Chancellor Livingston, NSDAR, May 2015 and published in "44 Patriots of the American Revolution interred in the Rhinebeck Reformed Church Cemetery". Provided by and used with permission of Sarah K Hermans

Henry Beekman Livingston

GRAVESTONE LOCATION:

Row 1, NONE—he is buried in what was the Livingston vault. His veteran marker is placed next to Robert J. Livingston's.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR SERVICE:

LIEUTENANT COLONEL: Graham's Levies [NYRC+S p.79] and 2nd Reg't New York Line
COLONEL: 4th Reg't New York Line [NYRC+S p. 47]

DAR ANCESTOR NUMBER: Not in DAR database

GENEALOGY:

Henry Beekman Livingston was born November 9th, 1750 at Clermont to Judge Robert R. Livingston and Margaret Beekman. He was brother of Chancellor Robert R. Livingston, Janet Livingston (widow of Maj. Gen. Richard Montgomery), and Secretary of State Edward Livingston. He married March 14th, 1781 in Philadelphia Nancy Shippen (cousin to Benedict Arnold's wife—Arnold and Livingston were friends before the treason of 1780). Their only child Margaret "Peggy" Livingston was born December 26th, 1781 in Philadelphia. Peggy died unmarried leaving no one who (legitimately) descends from this Patriot.

He began his Revolutionary war career as a Captain, having raised a militia that drilled on the lawn of the Beekman Arms. He went as far as Montreal with his brother-in-law Richard Montgomery, but Montgomery sent him back to Albany after the city was taken. He felt great disdain for men in higher positions of power that he felt had lower social rank that he. He was a Colonel of the 4th New York Line at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777 and the Battle of Monmouth and the Battles of Rhode Island and Quaker Hill in 1778. Irritated that he wasn't getting promoted higher than colonel, he resigned his commission effective January 1779.

After this, he returned to Clermont and then to a house he inherited in Rhinebeck. Throughout his marriage to Nancy Shippen he was prone to extreme jealously and outrageous behavior that isolated him from his wife, child, siblings, and parents. Historian Geoff Benton summed up Henry Beekman Livingston perfectly when he said that "an ungoverable temper, surpassed only by a repugnant attitude, left him with an abbreviated military career, a spectacularly failed marriage and completely cut off from the rest of the Livingston's." You can read more about his dramatic personal life at clermontstatehistoricsite.blogspot.com. He died November 5th, 1831 "alone and unmourned."

I think you need to google this person. 1748 was birth year. Married twice. More.


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