Advertisement

Sir John Eliot

Advertisement

Sir John Eliot Famous memorial

Birth
St Germans, Cornwall Unitary Authority, Cornwall, England
Death
27 Nov 1632 (aged 40)
London, City of London, Greater London, England
Burial
Wapping, London Borough of Tower Hamlets, Greater London, England
Memorial ID
16140332 View Source

English Parliamentarian. Born the son of Richard Eliot and Bridget Carswell at Cuddenbeak, St Germans, Cornwall. He was educated at Blundell's School, Tiverton, at Exeter College, Oxford, and studied law in London. He began his parliamentary career for St Germans in 1614. By May 1618 he was knighted, and in 1619 he won the appointment of Vice-Admiral of Devon. He was elected Member of Parliament for Newport in February 1624 and delivered his first speech, winning accolades as an orator and enemies among the government. In 1626 as member for St Germans, he made an open attack upon the Duke Buckingham and his administration. In May he was one of the members who carried Buckingham's impeachment to the House of Lords. The following day Eliot and his colleague Digges were committed to the Tower. The House of Commons refused to proceed with business as long as Eliot and Digges were held, when the pair was released, parliament was dissolved on June 15, and Eliot lost his post as vice-admiral. In 1629 Eliot's resolutions against illegal taxation were read to the House even after the king had ordered adjournment. Eliot and eight other members were imprisoned in the Tower. Eliot refused to answer charges against him, citing parliamentary privilege. In January 1630 he appeared at the King's Bench to answer a charge of conspiracy to resist the king's order, and refusing to acknowledge jurisdiction of the court. He was fined £2000 and ordered imprisoned at the king's pleasure. He became an author in confinement, writing such works as 'The Monarchie of Man, a political treatise;' 'De jure majestatis, a Political Treatise of Government;' and 'An Apology for Socrates, his own defense.' In the spring of 1632 he developed tuberculosis and in October he petitioned Charles for permission to go into the country. His parole would only be granted at the price of submission, however, and was refused. He died a month later. Eliot's son requested permission to move his father's body to Cornwall, but the king refused, ordering Eliot interred at "the church of that parish where he died." In 1668, the House of Lords reversed his conviction as an illegal judgment against the freedom and privilege of Parliament.

English Parliamentarian. Born the son of Richard Eliot and Bridget Carswell at Cuddenbeak, St Germans, Cornwall. He was educated at Blundell's School, Tiverton, at Exeter College, Oxford, and studied law in London. He began his parliamentary career for St Germans in 1614. By May 1618 he was knighted, and in 1619 he won the appointment of Vice-Admiral of Devon. He was elected Member of Parliament for Newport in February 1624 and delivered his first speech, winning accolades as an orator and enemies among the government. In 1626 as member for St Germans, he made an open attack upon the Duke Buckingham and his administration. In May he was one of the members who carried Buckingham's impeachment to the House of Lords. The following day Eliot and his colleague Digges were committed to the Tower. The House of Commons refused to proceed with business as long as Eliot and Digges were held, when the pair was released, parliament was dissolved on June 15, and Eliot lost his post as vice-admiral. In 1629 Eliot's resolutions against illegal taxation were read to the House even after the king had ordered adjournment. Eliot and eight other members were imprisoned in the Tower. Eliot refused to answer charges against him, citing parliamentary privilege. In January 1630 he appeared at the King's Bench to answer a charge of conspiracy to resist the king's order, and refusing to acknowledge jurisdiction of the court. He was fined £2000 and ordered imprisoned at the king's pleasure. He became an author in confinement, writing such works as 'The Monarchie of Man, a political treatise;' 'De jure majestatis, a Political Treatise of Government;' and 'An Apology for Socrates, his own defense.' In the spring of 1632 he developed tuberculosis and in October he petitioned Charles for permission to go into the country. His parole would only be granted at the price of submission, however, and was refused. He died a month later. Eliot's son requested permission to move his father's body to Cornwall, but the king refused, ordering Eliot interred at "the church of that parish where he died." In 1668, the House of Lords reversed his conviction as an illegal judgment against the freedom and privilege of Parliament.

Bio by: Iola


Family Members

Parents
Spouse
Siblings
Children

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Sir John Eliot?

Current rating:

28 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Iola
  • Added: 11 Oct 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 16140332
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/16140332/john-eliot: accessed ), memorial page for Sir John Eliot (11 Apr 1592–27 Nov 1632), Find a Grave Memorial ID 16140332, citing Chapel of Saint Peter-ad-Vincula, Wapping, London Borough of Tower Hamlets, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find a Grave .