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Rev John Brazelton

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Rev John Brazelton

Birth
Kentucky, USA
Death 20 Apr 1907 (aged 84)
North Vernon, Jennings County, Indiana, USA
Burial North Vernon, Jennings County, Indiana, USA
Memorial ID 159903659 View Source
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North Vernon Plain Dealer April 25, 1907

REV. JOHN BRAZELTON

Died Last Sunday - Many Years Spent in Teaching and Preaching

Sunday noon, April 21st, Rev. John Brazelton died at his home in this city after a protracted illness resulting from injuries received from a fall during one of the winter slippery spells. For the past few years he had been in poor health, and was quite feeble until his death at which time he was 86 years old. Funeral services were conducted at the Christian church Tuesday by Rev. Barnett, pastor of the local church. The remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery.
Rev. John Brazelton was born in Kentucky, May 26, 1822, coming to Indiana with his parents a little later, settling in Jefferson county, four miles sourthwest of Kent, and six miles north of Lexington. Being religiously inclined from childhood, he followed in the footsteps of his parents, and united with the Methodist church, but ten years old, this being the prevailing religion of the neighborhood when they settled in Indiana.
At the age of thirteen years, his parents having died, he was left penniless and friendless to make his way through the world. He went to school, working morning, noon and night for a farmer for his board. In this way he managed to get a fair education for that day and age. At the age he began teaching, where North Madison now stands. He continued going to school and teaching alternately till eighteen years of age, when he began studying law with Joseph G. Marshall and Jas. D. Glass in Madison, continuing it for four years, almost day and night taking a thorough course and was then admitted to the bar. Teaching however was his delight and he returned to it, instead of practicing, law, and taught at Kent and vicinity for a number of years.
In February, 1851, he joined the Christian church and at once began preaching. The subject of his first sermon was "Faith as a Motive Power." About this time a district co-operative organization was formed of Ohio, Switzerland, Jefferson, Ripley, Jennings and Bartholomew counties, the management being lodged in a official board made up of one member from each congregation in the district to solicit means to support the work. Elder Phileman and Mr. Brazelton were employed as evangelists for the district at a salary of $600 per year each. The first year they baptized between 300 and 400.
In the spring of 1863, he was called to preach for the Christian church in Columbus and accepted. He was seized with a severe case of typhoid fever, in February, 1864 and lay unconscious for forty days. After coming to Columbus he sold his farm at Kent and bought another at Queensville. Just as he recovered from his case of typhoid fever his eldest daughter was stricken with the same disease. This was in April and before she got too bad she was carried to the train and the family moved to their new farm near Queensville, and for eight years Mr. Brazelton spent his time preaching and farming.
His first wife died October 5, 1871. In November, 1875, he moved his family to North Vernon and has lived there ever since and has devoted his time preaching, not only in Indiana, but in Ohio and Kentucky. His Indiana work was much in Delaware, Madison, Rush and Shelby counties, but the principal field of his life labor in the Lords vineyard was in southeastern Indiana.
During the first twenty years of his ministerial service he kept no account of his conversions or baptisms, but estimates it at 2,000. February 17, 1875, he was married again to Mrs. Nan Frost. He was from early manhood a reformer in politics, medicine and religion, embracing any proposition or movement that he thought would better the conditions of mankind.
He was a presidential elector on the Free Soil or Abolition ticket in 1847, and stumped northern Indiana.
In 1855 he was representative in the state legislature from Jefferson county and was present at the birth of the republican party. In 1833 he represented Jennings county in the State legislature.
His children by his first wife were in age rotation:
Mrs. Metta Reeder, now living in Long Beach, California.
Mrs. Jennie Houghton, Edinburg, Illinois
Mrs. Josie King, this city
Mrs. Flora Curtis, Queensville
Mrs. Lin C. Jones, this city
Mrs. Ernest Tripp, Indianapolis
Mrs. Robert McCollough


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I HAVE FOUGHT A GOOD FIGHT
I HAVE FINISHED MY COURSE
I HAVE KEPT THE FAITH


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