Advertisement

CPT George Dana Braadman Hill

Advertisement

CPT George Dana Braadman Hill

Birth
Lorain County, Ohio, USA
Death
4 Dec 1890 (aged 51)
Anacortes, Skagit County, Washington, USA
Burial
Seattle, King County, Washington, USA Add to Map
Plot
227
Memorial ID
View Source
Copyright ©2016 – Christopher Olson

George Dana Braadman Hill was born between June 11 and June 31, 1839, to Bezabeel Hill Jr. and Mary Bryant Thayer in Lorain County, Ohio. At the age of eleven, in 1850, he and his family lived in Vevay, Michigan. His family still lived in Vevay at the time of the July 2, 1860, census; however, he had turned twenty-one by then and already left the family home to start his life. He was working as a clerk in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and decided to enlist for the American Civil War, enlisting three times (notes 1 & 2):

May 13, 1861 – Enlisted, Private, Musician, Michigan 3rd Infantry Regiment, Company D
September 1, 1861 – Promoted, Principle Musician [Act, sections 16 & 17, August 3, 1861]
January 15, 1863 – Discharged
October 23, 1863 – Re-enlisted, 1st Sergeant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
January 2, 1865 – Promoted, 2nd Lieutenant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
May 1, 1865 – Promoted, 1st Lieutenant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
November 7, 1865 – Mustered Out
July 28, 1866 – 1st Lieutenant, 42nd Infantry, acc December 28, 1866 [Act, section 32]
March 2, 1867 – Promoted, Brevet Captain, “for gallantry and meritorious service in the battle of Appomattox”
April 22, 1869 – Unassigned status
December 31, 1870 – Retired, Captain Mounted “for loss of left arm from wound received in line of duty”

It was at this time that he received an appointment as the Indian Agent for the Tulalip Tribe, in the Washington Territory. On March 28, 1872, he married Ellen Hooper Kellogg, at the residence of her brother, David Kellogg. Ellen would later be sister-in-law to the first Governor of Washington, Elisha Ferry. Together, they had four children: Eliza Maud (1873), George Edward (1877), Ellen Kellogg (1881) and Eugene Cary (1883). He worked in Seattle in various prominent roles, as the county treasurer, as the second post-commander of the local department of the Grand Army of the Republic, and one of the many prominent men who participated in the volunteer militias that held the city of Seattle together during the Anti-Chinese Riots of 1886. He also held many leading roles within the Republican politics of the Pacific Northwest, but it was in land holdings that he and his wife made a small fortune. After his wife’s death, in 1887, he continued to build upon her holdings and it was while visiting the Anacortes area on December 4, 1890, that he boarded the gangplank at Fairhaven to board the steam ship Eastern Oregon, slipped into the water and was drowned.

Sources
1. Bagley, Clarence, B. History of Seattle: From the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time. Vol. II. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. Chicago. 1916. Pp. 460, 474, 583 & 696.
2. Register of the Army of the United States – 1876, P. 212
3. Register of the Army of the United States – 1881. P. 247
4. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 5, 1890, Vol. XIX, No. 25, Col. 7, P. 1.

Copyright ©2016 – Christopher Olson

George Dana Braadman Hill was born between June 11 and June 31, 1839, to Bezabeel Hill Jr. and Mary Bryant Thayer in Lorain County, Ohio. At the age of eleven, in 1850, he and his family lived in Vevay, Michigan. His family still lived in Vevay at the time of the July 2, 1860, census; however, he had turned twenty-one by then and already left the family home to start his life. He was working as a clerk in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and decided to enlist for the American Civil War, enlisting three times (notes 1 & 2):

May 13, 1861 – Enlisted, Private, Musician, Michigan 3rd Infantry Regiment, Company D
September 1, 1861 – Promoted, Principle Musician [Act, sections 16 & 17, August 3, 1861]
January 15, 1863 – Discharged
October 23, 1863 – Re-enlisted, 1st Sergeant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
January 2, 1865 – Promoted, 2nd Lieutenant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
May 1, 1865 – Promoted, 1st Lieutenant, Michigan 1st Cavalry Regiment, Company I
November 7, 1865 – Mustered Out
July 28, 1866 – 1st Lieutenant, 42nd Infantry, acc December 28, 1866 [Act, section 32]
March 2, 1867 – Promoted, Brevet Captain, “for gallantry and meritorious service in the battle of Appomattox”
April 22, 1869 – Unassigned status
December 31, 1870 – Retired, Captain Mounted “for loss of left arm from wound received in line of duty”

It was at this time that he received an appointment as the Indian Agent for the Tulalip Tribe, in the Washington Territory. On March 28, 1872, he married Ellen Hooper Kellogg, at the residence of her brother, David Kellogg. Ellen would later be sister-in-law to the first Governor of Washington, Elisha Ferry. Together, they had four children: Eliza Maud (1873), George Edward (1877), Ellen Kellogg (1881) and Eugene Cary (1883). He worked in Seattle in various prominent roles, as the county treasurer, as the second post-commander of the local department of the Grand Army of the Republic, and one of the many prominent men who participated in the volunteer militias that held the city of Seattle together during the Anti-Chinese Riots of 1886. He also held many leading roles within the Republican politics of the Pacific Northwest, but it was in land holdings that he and his wife made a small fortune. After his wife’s death, in 1887, he continued to build upon her holdings and it was while visiting the Anacortes area on December 4, 1890, that he boarded the gangplank at Fairhaven to board the steam ship Eastern Oregon, slipped into the water and was drowned.

Sources
1. Bagley, Clarence, B. History of Seattle: From the Earliest Settlement to the Present Time. Vol. II. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. Chicago. 1916. Pp. 460, 474, 583 & 696.
2. Register of the Army of the United States – 1876, P. 212
3. Register of the Army of the United States – 1881. P. 247
4. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 5, 1890, Vol. XIX, No. 25, Col. 7, P. 1.



Advertisement