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Chief John “Young Tassel” Watts

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Chief John “Young Tassel” Watts Famous memorial

Birth
Wills Valley, DeKalb County, Alabama, USA
Death
1808 (aged 57–58)
Wills Valley, DeKalb County, Alabama, USA
Burial
DeKalb County, Alabama, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
View Source
Chief of the Lower Cherokee from 1792 until his death. He was hand picked by Chief Dragging Canoe, his predecessor. Before becoming chief, he was on the war council and a leader of the Chickamauga Cherokee during the Cherokee/American Wars in the later part of the 1700s. His war party was based at Willstown, sometimes called Wattstown, in Wills Valley just north of Fort Payne, Alabama, at the base of Lookout Mountain. Their goal was to stop white aggression and the taking of land that was rightfully theirs. He was of mixed blood, the son of a British trader and Cherokee interpreter, John Watts, and a Cherokee woman, Oousta White Owl Carpenter, sister of several Cherokee Chiefs including Old Tassel, for whom he was named. The murder of his uncle initiated his involvement in Cherokee affairs with him leading numerous attacks on American forces and white settlements. After several years of war and losing many warriors, he realized their efforts were futile and signed the Treaty of Tellico Blockhouse November 7, 1794 resulting in a short-lived peace. He should not be confused with Red Head Will. That name has been wrongly added to the gravestone by the creator. He was Will Webber, the Chief of Willstown, who left for Arkansas in 1796, dying there.
Chief of the Lower Cherokee from 1792 until his death. He was hand picked by Chief Dragging Canoe, his predecessor. Before becoming chief, he was on the war council and a leader of the Chickamauga Cherokee during the Cherokee/American Wars in the later part of the 1700s. His war party was based at Willstown, sometimes called Wattstown, in Wills Valley just north of Fort Payne, Alabama, at the base of Lookout Mountain. Their goal was to stop white aggression and the taking of land that was rightfully theirs. He was of mixed blood, the son of a British trader and Cherokee interpreter, John Watts, and a Cherokee woman, Oousta White Owl Carpenter, sister of several Cherokee Chiefs including Old Tassel, for whom he was named. The murder of his uncle initiated his involvement in Cherokee affairs with him leading numerous attacks on American forces and white settlements. After several years of war and losing many warriors, he realized their efforts were futile and signed the Treaty of Tellico Blockhouse November 7, 1794 resulting in a short-lived peace. He should not be confused with Red Head Will. That name has been wrongly added to the gravestone by the creator. He was Will Webber, the Chief of Willstown, who left for Arkansas in 1796, dying there.

Bio by: Bobby and Judy Laney Liles


Inscription

John Watts 1750
AKA Red Head Will
Is Buried Here

Gravesite Details

Large granite boulder with hand made concrete marker.



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