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Capt William Turner Sadler

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Capt William Turner Sadler

Birth
North Carolina, USA
Death
18 Feb 1884 (aged 86)
Texas, USA
Burial
Anderson County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID
15928754 View Source

W.T. Sadler was born in North Carolina, rather than Tennessee as the marker says. He came to Texas in 1832 from Georgia and settled in what is now southern Anderson County on a league of land. After his first marriage in 1838 that land was granted to him and became known as the W.T. Sadler Plantaton.

In 1835, Sadler was appointed as captain of one of the frontier units of the newly formed Texas Rangers. This was the beginning of W.T. Sadler's prominence in early Texas history.

Sadler enlisted in the Texas Army and fought at the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836. He was made Adjutant Captain by General Sam Houston. Sadler could speak Spanish and was selected to question Santa Anna after his capture.

On October 18, 1838, Sadler's wife, Mary Murchison, was killed in an Indian raid at John Edens home near Augusta in northern Houston County. Some believe a Sadler child was also killed.

Sadler was elected as representative to the Republic of Texas Congress in 1844/1845 and later served in the First and Second State Legislatures after Texas was admitted to the Union.

In about 1843, Sadler married Permelia Bennett. She and one of their children were killed by a tornado in 1866. They were buried across the field from the house and this became the Sadler Family Cemetery.

The 1850, 1860 & 1870 Federal Censuses and other records list these children, Nathaniel Fletcher, Martha Tucker, Mary Ann, William Peterson, Elizabeth, Laura, and Celestia R.

In 1936, the State of Texas erected a marker at the graves of Captain Sadler and Permelia.

The only other engraved headstones in Sadler Cemetery are those of their son, William Peterson and his wife, Josephine Roach Sadler. There are several graves marked only with rocks.
---
CAPTAIN SADLER DEAD

An Old Veteran and Worthy Citizen Gone to Rest.

(Special to the news)

Palestine March 5.- Captain W.T. Sadler one of the veterans of San Jacinto, died last week at his home, about four miles below Elkhart, in this county. He was 86 years of age, and had been a member of the Texas congress and of the legislature of the State after annexation.
He was of singularly modest and retiring disposition, and had never taken any part in the proceedings of the Veterans association, being desirous of avoiding, as he stated to his children, all glorification
for the past.
Indeed, he was so sensitive on this point that he left special instructions with his son to have his funeral conducted quietly and not to have the news of his death circulated until after he was laid in the grave, and his wishes were respected by the family, so that it was only to-day the news reached Palestine, to the sincere regret of all his old friends.
(Obit courtesy of Nancy Bundrick)
---
The Austin Statesman picked up on the news via telegram and carried a notice in its March 7 issue. Judge Jowers of the Elkhart area stated that Sadler had served in both the Texas Congress and the Texas legislature after annexation. The State's obituary related that Sadler "during the fading years of his life declined having anything to do with public demonstrations in connection with his fellow soldiers, claiming such demonstrations were uncalled for and useless. He was 86 years of age and connected with nearly all the prominent families of the state.
(Courtesy of Nancy Bundrick)

W.T. Sadler was born in North Carolina, rather than Tennessee as the marker says. He came to Texas in 1832 from Georgia and settled in what is now southern Anderson County on a league of land. After his first marriage in 1838 that land was granted to him and became known as the W.T. Sadler Plantaton.

In 1835, Sadler was appointed as captain of one of the frontier units of the newly formed Texas Rangers. This was the beginning of W.T. Sadler's prominence in early Texas history.

Sadler enlisted in the Texas Army and fought at the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836. He was made Adjutant Captain by General Sam Houston. Sadler could speak Spanish and was selected to question Santa Anna after his capture.

On October 18, 1838, Sadler's wife, Mary Murchison, was killed in an Indian raid at John Edens home near Augusta in northern Houston County. Some believe a Sadler child was also killed.

Sadler was elected as representative to the Republic of Texas Congress in 1844/1845 and later served in the First and Second State Legislatures after Texas was admitted to the Union.

In about 1843, Sadler married Permelia Bennett. She and one of their children were killed by a tornado in 1866. They were buried across the field from the house and this became the Sadler Family Cemetery.

The 1850, 1860 & 1870 Federal Censuses and other records list these children, Nathaniel Fletcher, Martha Tucker, Mary Ann, William Peterson, Elizabeth, Laura, and Celestia R.

In 1936, the State of Texas erected a marker at the graves of Captain Sadler and Permelia.

The only other engraved headstones in Sadler Cemetery are those of their son, William Peterson and his wife, Josephine Roach Sadler. There are several graves marked only with rocks.
---
CAPTAIN SADLER DEAD

An Old Veteran and Worthy Citizen Gone to Rest.

(Special to the news)

Palestine March 5.- Captain W.T. Sadler one of the veterans of San Jacinto, died last week at his home, about four miles below Elkhart, in this county. He was 86 years of age, and had been a member of the Texas congress and of the legislature of the State after annexation.
He was of singularly modest and retiring disposition, and had never taken any part in the proceedings of the Veterans association, being desirous of avoiding, as he stated to his children, all glorification
for the past.
Indeed, he was so sensitive on this point that he left special instructions with his son to have his funeral conducted quietly and not to have the news of his death circulated until after he was laid in the grave, and his wishes were respected by the family, so that it was only to-day the news reached Palestine, to the sincere regret of all his old friends.
(Obit courtesy of Nancy Bundrick)
---
The Austin Statesman picked up on the news via telegram and carried a notice in its March 7 issue. Judge Jowers of the Elkhart area stated that Sadler had served in both the Texas Congress and the Texas legislature after annexation. The State's obituary related that Sadler "during the fading years of his life declined having anything to do with public demonstrations in connection with his fellow soldiers, claiming such demonstrations were uncalled for and useless. He was 86 years of age and connected with nearly all the prominent families of the state.
(Courtesy of Nancy Bundrick)


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