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David Cooper

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David Cooper

Birth
Fredericktown, Cecil County, Maryland, USA
Death
18 Jun 1877 (aged 55–56)
Utah, USA
Burial
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA Add to Map
Plot
A_7_11
Memorial ID
View Source
David Cooper was born in Brooks Reserve, Fredericton, Maryland in 1821. His family emigrated to Pennsylvania when he was 10. He was educated there, including Gettysburg College. He was a Whig and worked on behalf of the election of Zachary Taylor to the Presidency, for which he was rewarded with a judgeship in the new Minn. Terr. Unseated from his position by the Democrats in 1853, he returned to lawyering in St. Paul.

He and his family emigrated to the silver country in Nevada in the 1860s, perhaps after the Civil War. His wife remarried and was living with all but the oldest of her Cooper children in the Nathan D. Anderson household in Lander Co., Nevada at the time that David Cooper died in hospital at Salt Lake City in 1877. He was a lifelong eccentric and died with debts, which explains the markerless grave; apparently no relative or colleague wanted to splurge for a permanent grave marker?

I would appreciate any leads as to more details of the Judge David Cooper story. I am a Minnesota historian with reason to seek information, especially about the family's Minnesota Territory years 1849-1857 and about David Cooper's personal activities, including work on behalf of the Ojibwe in 1862 during the Indian unrest.
David Cooper was born in Brooks Reserve, Fredericton, Maryland in 1821. His family emigrated to Pennsylvania when he was 10. He was educated there, including Gettysburg College. He was a Whig and worked on behalf of the election of Zachary Taylor to the Presidency, for which he was rewarded with a judgeship in the new Minn. Terr. Unseated from his position by the Democrats in 1853, he returned to lawyering in St. Paul.

He and his family emigrated to the silver country in Nevada in the 1860s, perhaps after the Civil War. His wife remarried and was living with all but the oldest of her Cooper children in the Nathan D. Anderson household in Lander Co., Nevada at the time that David Cooper died in hospital at Salt Lake City in 1877. He was a lifelong eccentric and died with debts, which explains the markerless grave; apparently no relative or colleague wanted to splurge for a permanent grave marker?

I would appreciate any leads as to more details of the Judge David Cooper story. I am a Minnesota historian with reason to seek information, especially about the family's Minnesota Territory years 1849-1857 and about David Cooper's personal activities, including work on behalf of the Ojibwe in 1862 during the Indian unrest.

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