Guy de Lusignan

Guy de Lusignan

Birth
Lusignan, Departement de la Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death 1192 (aged 41–42)
Cyprus
Burial Nicosia, Nicosia, Cyprus
Memorial ID 157141603 · View Source
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Father: Hugues VIII, 'le Vieux' de Lusignan, Seigneur de Lusignan, comte de la Marche, b.10-Nov-1106, Lusignan, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France, d.11-Apr-1169, Palestine, Holy Land, Jerusalem, (aged to 62 years).

Mother: Bourgogne de Rançon, dame de Fortenay, b. 1110, Fontenay-le-comte, Vendée, Pays de la Loire, France, d.11-Apr-1169, Lusignan, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France, (aged to 59 years).
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TITLES: Guy I, de Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, Lord of Cyprus.
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Guy of Lusignan (c. 1150 – 18 July 1194) was a Poitevin knight, son of Hugh VIII of the Lusignan dynasty. He was king of the crusader state of Jerusalem from 1186 to 1192, by right of marriage to Sibylla of Jerusalem, heiress to the throne of Jerusalem. Having arrived in the Holy Land (where his brother Amalric was already prominent), but at an unknown date - Guy was hastily married to Sibylla, in 1180, to prevent a political incident within the kingdom. As King Baldwin IV's health deteriorated, Guy was appointed regent of Jerusalem. At Sibylla's succession to the throne in 1186 she gave the crown to Guy as her king-consort. The couple became co-rulers of Jerusalem. Guy's reign was marked by increased hostilities with the Ayyubids ruled by Saladin, culminating in the the disastrous Battle of Hattin against Saladin in July 1187 - during which, most were killed or captured. Guy too was captured, but released. The fall of Jerusalem itself three months later. Hence, Guy de Lusignan is quite rightly remembered as the Crusader King who lost the Kingdom of Jerusalem due to his incompetent leadership. But Guy was not the only Lusignan to make his fortune in the Holy Land. On the contrary, he was following in the footsteps of his older brother, Aimery, and it was Aimery, not the feckless Guy, who founded the Lusignan dynasty - which would reign until, 1489. Unsurprisingly therefore, Aimery is listed as one of his brother’s closest allies and supporters during Guy and Sibylla’s coup d’etat in 1186. It was in his interest to do so and any other behavior would have been highly abnormal. It does not imply, however, that he thought highly of his brother or his brother’s leadership. This was simply a matter of family loyalty and self-interest. And it took both to the "Horns of Hattin", humiliating defeat and captivity. He was with his brother when King Guy surrendered, and went with him into Saracen captivity. As the Lusignan brothers and most of the other barons of Jerusalem moldered in a Saracen prison, the entire Kingdom of Jerusalem fell, city by city, and castle by castle, to Saladin - until only the city of Tyre and isolated castles - still held-out. There was now, no kingdom from which to raise a ransom, and Aimery’s wife had also lost her inheritance to Saladin’s forces. As 1188 dawned, Aimery de Lusignan must have expected he would suffer his father’s fate and die in Saracen captivity. It would have been very hard for him to envisage that one day he would be a King too, and found a dynasty that would last roughly 300 years (in-as-much-as, Guy has become the King of Cyprus, 1192 to 1194 - lands given to him by, King Richard "the Lion-hearted", of England).


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  • Created by: Robert Kuhmann
  • Added: 16 Jan 2016
  • Find A Grave Memorial 157141603
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Guy de Lusignan (1150–1192), Find A Grave Memorial no. 157141603, citing Church of the Templars (Defunct), Nicosia, Nicosia, Cyprus ; Maintained by Robert Kuhmann (contributor 46567652) .