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 D.H. Lawrence

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D.H. Lawrence Famous memorial

Original Name
David Herbert Lawrence
Birth
Eastwood, Broxtowe Borough, Nottinghamshire, England
Death
2 Mar 1930 (aged 44)
Vence, Departement des Alpes-Maritimes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Burial
San Cristobal, Taos County, New Mexico, USA
Plot
The Lawrence Memorial
Memorial ID
1564 View Source

Author. He received world-wide notoriety as an English author at the beginning of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters . He wrote on a wide range of complex subjects from political views of the industrial revolution, exploration of the female sexuality, mental health and at times autobiographical with his own unhappy childhood. He was very knowledgeable on many topics and had linguistic precision to express his stark and radical viewpoints in words, which were often censored. He is best known for his 1924 novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover," which was banned in the United States until 1959 and England until 1960. Quickly selling three million copies when finally released, the novel was also banned for a time in Canada, Australia, India and Japan. Born David Herbert Lawrence to an illiterate coal miner and a part-time schoolteacher, he was very sickly at birth and his parents feared he would never reach adulthood. An excellent student, he was awarded a scholarship to further his education. He never had the desire to work in the mines like his father. In 1907 he was published for the first time in the local newspaper and by 1909, he had published his poetry. He received a teacher's certificate after studying at the University College in Nottingham from 1906 to 1908. His first novel, "The White Peacock," was published in 1910. By 1911, he had two serious bouts of pneumonia as an adult and had stopped teaching, pacing his activity to became a full-time writer. Based on a friend's diary, his second novel, "The Trespasser," was the saga of a young violin student, who has an adulterous affair with her older, married music teacher. In March of 1912, he had a chance meeting of German-born Frieda von Richthofen Weekley, who was six years his senior, the mother of three children, and wife of a respected university professor. Six weeks after their meeting, the couple left England and traveled to her parents' home in Germany before they walked south across the Alps to Italy to begin their life together. After Frieda received her divorce in 1914, the couple were married in England. During World War I , they were hounded by the English authorities because he was not in the military and his wife was German-born. Although they repeatedly quarreled, he was devoted to his wife even after her unfaithfulness. His 1913 work, "Sons and Lovers," won him critical acclaim. "The Rainbow," his 1916 follow-up, questioned sexual expression and morality with such bluntness that it was banned in England. The censoring of his writings impacted his income, thus frequently living in poverty. After the war, the couple relocated to Italy in a voluntary exile from England. In 1919 he had a severe case of influenza and nearly died. By this point, his lungs were chronically failing him. In 1922 while in Australia, he wrote the novel, "Kangaroo," which later was made into a movie in 1987. Besides Australia, Italy, and Germany, he and his wife traveled in exile to Ceylon, New Zealand , Tahiti, the French Riviera, Mexico and settling in Taos, New Mexico. In 1925 he returned to Europe. In 1926, at the Villa Mirenda in Tuscany, Italy, he began working on his most controversial and well-known novel. Originally titled "Tenderness," the novel, "Lady Chatterley's Lover," was immediately banned as pornography. Despite this, the book was very popular and unauthorized copies were mass-produced and distributed in Europe and the United States to meet popular demand. He also authored the novels "Women in Love," "Aaron's Rod," and "The Plumed Serpent," as well as three short stories, dozens of poems, six essays and sketches. His chronic lung condition made the last 18 months of his life difficult, yet he never stopped writing. After discharging himself against medical advice from a French sanatorium, he died within 24 hours from the complication of respiratory failure with the diagnosis of tuberculosis. He was initially buried in a small cemetery near the Mediterranean Sea, but his remains were later cremated, and in April 1935 brought back to New Mexico where the ashes were buried in his memorial chapel on their ranch. The house that was his birth place in Nottinghamshire is now the H.D. Lawrence Museum. Numerous plays, films, and television versions of "Lady Chatterley's Lover" have been produced with the BBC's 2015 production being the latest. The novel is listed as #39 on the list of the best 100 novels of the 20th century, which was published by the French newspaper "Le Monde."

Author. He received world-wide notoriety as an English author at the beginning of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters . He wrote on a wide range of complex subjects from political views of the industrial revolution, exploration of the female sexuality, mental health and at times autobiographical with his own unhappy childhood. He was very knowledgeable on many topics and had linguistic precision to express his stark and radical viewpoints in words, which were often censored. He is best known for his 1924 novel "Lady Chatterley's Lover," which was banned in the United States until 1959 and England until 1960. Quickly selling three million copies when finally released, the novel was also banned for a time in Canada, Australia, India and Japan. Born David Herbert Lawrence to an illiterate coal miner and a part-time schoolteacher, he was very sickly at birth and his parents feared he would never reach adulthood. An excellent student, he was awarded a scholarship to further his education. He never had the desire to work in the mines like his father. In 1907 he was published for the first time in the local newspaper and by 1909, he had published his poetry. He received a teacher's certificate after studying at the University College in Nottingham from 1906 to 1908. His first novel, "The White Peacock," was published in 1910. By 1911, he had two serious bouts of pneumonia as an adult and had stopped teaching, pacing his activity to became a full-time writer. Based on a friend's diary, his second novel, "The Trespasser," was the saga of a young violin student, who has an adulterous affair with her older, married music teacher. In March of 1912, he had a chance meeting of German-born Frieda von Richthofen Weekley, who was six years his senior, the mother of three children, and wife of a respected university professor. Six weeks after their meeting, the couple left England and traveled to her parents' home in Germany before they walked south across the Alps to Italy to begin their life together. After Frieda received her divorce in 1914, the couple were married in England. During World War I , they were hounded by the English authorities because he was not in the military and his wife was German-born. Although they repeatedly quarreled, he was devoted to his wife even after her unfaithfulness. His 1913 work, "Sons and Lovers," won him critical acclaim. "The Rainbow," his 1916 follow-up, questioned sexual expression and morality with such bluntness that it was banned in England. The censoring of his writings impacted his income, thus frequently living in poverty. After the war, the couple relocated to Italy in a voluntary exile from England. In 1919 he had a severe case of influenza and nearly died. By this point, his lungs were chronically failing him. In 1922 while in Australia, he wrote the novel, "Kangaroo," which later was made into a movie in 1987. Besides Australia, Italy, and Germany, he and his wife traveled in exile to Ceylon, New Zealand , Tahiti, the French Riviera, Mexico and settling in Taos, New Mexico. In 1925 he returned to Europe. In 1926, at the Villa Mirenda in Tuscany, Italy, he began working on his most controversial and well-known novel. Originally titled "Tenderness," the novel, "Lady Chatterley's Lover," was immediately banned as pornography. Despite this, the book was very popular and unauthorized copies were mass-produced and distributed in Europe and the United States to meet popular demand. He also authored the novels "Women in Love," "Aaron's Rod," and "The Plumed Serpent," as well as three short stories, dozens of poems, six essays and sketches. His chronic lung condition made the last 18 months of his life difficult, yet he never stopped writing. After discharging himself against medical advice from a French sanatorium, he died within 24 hours from the complication of respiratory failure with the diagnosis of tuberculosis. He was initially buried in a small cemetery near the Mediterranean Sea, but his remains were later cremated, and in April 1935 brought back to New Mexico where the ashes were buried in his memorial chapel on their ranch. The house that was his birth place in Nottinghamshire is now the H.D. Lawrence Museum. Numerous plays, films, and television versions of "Lady Chatterley's Lover" have been produced with the BBC's 2015 production being the latest. The novel is listed as #39 on the list of the best 100 novels of the 20th century, which was published by the French newspaper "Le Monde."

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: 31 Dec 2000
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 1564
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/1564/dh-lawrence: accessed ), memorial page for D.H. Lawrence (11 Sep 1885–2 Mar 1930), Find a Grave Memorial ID 1564, citing Kiowa Ranch Cemetery, San Cristobal, Taos County, New Mexico, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.