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Wilhelm Hohenzollern

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Wilhelm Hohenzollern Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Potsdam, Stadtkreis Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany
Death
26 May 1940 (aged 33)
Nivelles, Arrondissement de Nivelles, Walloon Brabant, Belgium
Burial
Potsdam, Stadtkreis Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany Add to Map
Memorial ID
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German Royalty. He was the eldest son of Crown Prince Wilhelm of Prussia and grandson of German Emperor and King of Prussia Wilhelm II. He was the second in line to the Prussian throne and the German Imperial throne, but the abdication of his grandfather and the abolition of the monarchy drastically changed the course of his young life. He attended the University of Bonn where he met Dorothea von Salviati, a member of a minor noble family. They were to marry on June 3, 1933, but because of the disparity in their rank, he was required to renounce his rights to the succession, as well as any rights for children born to the marriage. He served in the Wehrmacht during World War II and participated in the 1940 invasion of France, where he was wounded in Valenciennes and died at a field hospital in Nivelles. He was buried at the Antikentempel (Antique Temple) in Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. His death elicited much public sympathy for the former royal family with over 50,000 mourners observing the funeral cortege. Fearful of the threat their remaining popularity posed, Hitler issued the Prinzenerlass (English: Princes Decree) following Wilhelm's death, which prohibited members of Germany's former ruling families from participating in active military operations. Prince Wilhelm was survived by his wife; two daughters; both of his parents; and his paternal grandfather, former Kaiser Wilhelm II. The former Kaiser retroactively recognized Prince Wilhelm's marriage as dynastic and his two daughters were thereby accorded the style of Princess of Prussia (Royal Highness).
German Royalty. He was the eldest son of Crown Prince Wilhelm of Prussia and grandson of German Emperor and King of Prussia Wilhelm II. He was the second in line to the Prussian throne and the German Imperial throne, but the abdication of his grandfather and the abolition of the monarchy drastically changed the course of his young life. He attended the University of Bonn where he met Dorothea von Salviati, a member of a minor noble family. They were to marry on June 3, 1933, but because of the disparity in their rank, he was required to renounce his rights to the succession, as well as any rights for children born to the marriage. He served in the Wehrmacht during World War II and participated in the 1940 invasion of France, where he was wounded in Valenciennes and died at a field hospital in Nivelles. He was buried at the Antikentempel (Antique Temple) in Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. His death elicited much public sympathy for the former royal family with over 50,000 mourners observing the funeral cortege. Fearful of the threat their remaining popularity posed, Hitler issued the Prinzenerlass (English: Princes Decree) following Wilhelm's death, which prohibited members of Germany's former ruling families from participating in active military operations. Prince Wilhelm was survived by his wife; two daughters; both of his parents; and his paternal grandfather, former Kaiser Wilhelm II. The former Kaiser retroactively recognized Prince Wilhelm's marriage as dynastic and his two daughters were thereby accorded the style of Princess of Prussia (Royal Highness).

Bio by: CMWJR



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: David
  • Added: Sep 2, 2006
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15588632/wilhelm-hohenzollern: accessed ), memorial page for Wilhelm Hohenzollern (4 Jul 1906–26 May 1940), Find a Grave Memorial ID 15588632, citing Antikentempel, Potsdam, Stadtkreis Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany; Maintained by Find a Grave.