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Capt John Robert Grant

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Capt John Robert Grant

Birth
Strath, Highland, Scotland
Death
1790 (aged 60–61)
Summerville, Hants County, Nova Scotia, Canada
Burial
Summerville, Hants County, Nova Scotia, Canada
Memorial ID
153214888 View Source

Strathspey (Scottish Gaelic, Srath Spè) is the area around the strath of the River Spey, Scotland, in both the Moray council area and the Badenoch and Strathspey committee area of Highland.
Son of Alexander Grant b. about 1699 in Scotland
m. August 30 1759 Long Island,New York USA Sarah Bergen of Brooklyn NY 1759 who d. 1808 Loyal Hill NS
additional d. 1792 given Summerville buried Loyal Hill Nova Scotia
Overloooking the Avon River and Minas Basin in Hants County at Summerville, Nova Scotia is one of the most interesting locations where United Empire Loyalists settled after the American Revolution. It is called Loyal Hill and is the lands settled by Captain John Grant who served in the 42nd Regiment of Foot (Black Watch) and later commanded British soldiers when they recaptured New York in April 1776. For his military service as a Loyalist he received a grant of 3,000 acres, the largest grant to an individual in Hants County .

There is a monument to a Highlander who became a United Empire Loyalist in the Loyal Hill Cemetery at Summerville, Nova Scotia.

Captain John Grant was born in Strathspey, Scotland in 1729 and served with the 42nd Regiment of Foot ( Black Watch ) in France and America. He retired from his Regiment to live in New York where he had married and started a family.

During the American Revolution he served with the British forces and afterwards was exiled to Nova Scotia where he received as a United Empire Loyalist a large land grant in Hants County for his military service. He called his new home 'Loyal Hill'.
In 1783 Grant left his family in New York and sailed on the Her Majesty’s ship“Berwick” to Halifax, Nova Scotia, arriving on July 1. He visited Shelburne to see if he could obtain a grants of land there but was unsuccessful. Returning to New York he was advised he would beg ranted lands on the Hants shore in Nova Scotia in the Township of Newport and amounting to 3,000 acres. With his family he sailed on October 16 on the transport “Stafford” to Halifax, arriving there 10 days later. They traveled from there overland to Windsor and arrived on May 23, 1784 at their new home which he called ‘Loyal Hill’. They also brought with them black slaves by the names of Sam, Nance, Pompy, Fillis, Tom, Maso, Harry, and Betsy. The custom of bring slaves as servants was common at the time.
Brian McConnell U.E. supplied bio

Strathspey (Scottish Gaelic, Srath Spè) is the area around the strath of the River Spey, Scotland, in both the Moray council area and the Badenoch and Strathspey committee area of Highland.
Son of Alexander Grant b. about 1699 in Scotland
m. August 30 1759 Long Island,New York USA Sarah Bergen of Brooklyn NY 1759 who d. 1808 Loyal Hill NS
additional d. 1792 given Summerville buried Loyal Hill Nova Scotia
Overloooking the Avon River and Minas Basin in Hants County at Summerville, Nova Scotia is one of the most interesting locations where United Empire Loyalists settled after the American Revolution. It is called Loyal Hill and is the lands settled by Captain John Grant who served in the 42nd Regiment of Foot (Black Watch) and later commanded British soldiers when they recaptured New York in April 1776. For his military service as a Loyalist he received a grant of 3,000 acres, the largest grant to an individual in Hants County .

There is a monument to a Highlander who became a United Empire Loyalist in the Loyal Hill Cemetery at Summerville, Nova Scotia.

Captain John Grant was born in Strathspey, Scotland in 1729 and served with the 42nd Regiment of Foot ( Black Watch ) in France and America. He retired from his Regiment to live in New York where he had married and started a family.

During the American Revolution he served with the British forces and afterwards was exiled to Nova Scotia where he received as a United Empire Loyalist a large land grant in Hants County for his military service. He called his new home 'Loyal Hill'.
In 1783 Grant left his family in New York and sailed on the Her Majesty’s ship“Berwick” to Halifax, Nova Scotia, arriving on July 1. He visited Shelburne to see if he could obtain a grants of land there but was unsuccessful. Returning to New York he was advised he would beg ranted lands on the Hants shore in Nova Scotia in the Township of Newport and amounting to 3,000 acres. With his family he sailed on October 16 on the transport “Stafford” to Halifax, arriving there 10 days later. They traveled from there overland to Windsor and arrived on May 23, 1784 at their new home which he called ‘Loyal Hill’. They also brought with them black slaves by the names of Sam, Nance, Pompy, Fillis, Tom, Maso, Harry, and Betsy. The custom of bring slaves as servants was common at the time.
Brian McConnell U.E. supplied bio


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