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 Margaret Floyer

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Margaret Floyer

Birth
Louth, East Lindsey District, Lincolnshire, England
Death
8 Dec 1815 (aged 60–61)
Dartmouth, Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada
Burial
Dartmouth, Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada
Memorial ID
153079589 View Source

Annals of the Family of Floyer, JK Floyer, 1898 -
"Of the remainder of Captain William's large family of eleven, little is known except of one daughter, Margaret. In 1782 she was living with her sister Anne at Newark, but a year or two later she emigrated with her brother William, a lieutenant in the 1st Battalion of His Majesty's Sixtieth or Royal American Regiment of Foot, to Nova Scotia. The following account of her residence there was extracted from Mrs. Lawson's History of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrence-town:

"In 1793, St. Pierre was taken by the British, and a number of the inhabitants were brought to Halifax. Among them was the Governour of the Island, M. Danseville, a devoted adherent of the House of Bourbon, who refused to return to his native land while Napoleon was in power. Governour Wentworth transmitted a memorial from him to the Duke of Portland on the l0th October 1794, requesting certain rights and privileges during his residence in Nova Scotia. This gentleman afterwards went to the Old Preston Road, Halifax, and dwelt with Margaret Floyer. Many years previous to his arrival, Margaret Floyer had arrived there from England with her brother William. William purchased a property near Allen's tanyard, on the Old Preston Road, where he built a pretty, comfortable cottage, and there the two lived together for some time. She is described by those who remember her as 'a refined, intellectual woman, with a sweet, sad face, and gentle, winning address, very reticent and quiet, but exceedingly courteous to all who knew her.' William is said to have stayed there for a year or two, and departed to join his regiment which had arrived in Jamaica. Margaret lived on alone at the cottage, not associating much with the other inhabitants, but amusing herself with her books and flowers and garden. She was kind to those about her, especially in times of illness, and was devoted to children, whom she always made welcome.

"When M. Danseville came to Dartmouth he was attracted by the appearance of the cottage, called to enquire if he could be lodged there, and received an affirmative answer.

"He was very genial and companionable, talked freely of his home, and wife, and family in France, and of his change of fortune. A few still remember the courtly old gentleman with silver hair and charming manners, who made himself happy under adverse circumstances. Margaret Floyer was always in easy circumstances. Remittances arrived punctually from England, and her wants were few. M. Danseville, feeling that it might be years before be could return to France, and to fill his leisure time, induced Margaret Floyer to consent to the building of a larger house on another part of her property. The result was a long, low, stone cottage with a flat roof, set in a sheltered situation, and surrounded by forest trees. Here he spent a great deal of time in laying out and ornamenting the grounds. Before the new house was quite finished, the one where they bad been living was destroyed by fire during their temporary absence from home in the summer. They took possession of the new house and personally supervised its completion, and 'Brook House,' as it was called, from its neatness and pretty appearance, became the admiration of passers-by. At 'Brook House' the two lived together until 1814, when news came to Halifax that Napoleon was a prisoner on the Island of Elba. M. Danseville was overjoyed at the Restoration of the Royal Family. He at once dressed himself in his long-unused uniform, put on his hat with its white cockade, and walked up and down the road during the whole afternoon of one day, shouting 'Vive La France!' He took passage in the next ship bound for France, and parted with the lady who had given him shelter with every demonstration of friendship and regret.

"After his departure Margaret Floyer led a more retired life than ever, and developed erysipelas. She was found one morning unconscious in her room, and presently expired. Sir John Wentworth announced her death to her family in England. Her nephew, John Gould Floyer, gave Sir John a power of attorney to administer her estate, and Mr. John Waite Attorney, Mayor of Boston, her brother-in-law, represented the claimant in England. Correspondence passed between Halifax and England during the four years from 1815 to 1819, and eventually the property was sold and the balance remitted. Margaret Floyor was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, and her spirit was said to have been seen wandering about her grave. Her relations in England caused a large stone slab to be placed over her grave. The inscription is as follows:

AGED 60 YEARS

Daughter of Capt. William Floyer of Reesby Hall, and Frances Ayscoghe

Annals of the Family of Floyer, JK Floyer, 1898 -
"Of the remainder of Captain William's large family of eleven, little is known except of one daughter, Margaret. In 1782 she was living with her sister Anne at Newark, but a year or two later she emigrated with her brother William, a lieutenant in the 1st Battalion of His Majesty's Sixtieth or Royal American Regiment of Foot, to Nova Scotia. The following account of her residence there was extracted from Mrs. Lawson's History of Dartmouth, Preston, and Lawrence-town:

"In 1793, St. Pierre was taken by the British, and a number of the inhabitants were brought to Halifax. Among them was the Governour of the Island, M. Danseville, a devoted adherent of the House of Bourbon, who refused to return to his native land while Napoleon was in power. Governour Wentworth transmitted a memorial from him to the Duke of Portland on the l0th October 1794, requesting certain rights and privileges during his residence in Nova Scotia. This gentleman afterwards went to the Old Preston Road, Halifax, and dwelt with Margaret Floyer. Many years previous to his arrival, Margaret Floyer had arrived there from England with her brother William. William purchased a property near Allen's tanyard, on the Old Preston Road, where he built a pretty, comfortable cottage, and there the two lived together for some time. She is described by those who remember her as 'a refined, intellectual woman, with a sweet, sad face, and gentle, winning address, very reticent and quiet, but exceedingly courteous to all who knew her.' William is said to have stayed there for a year or two, and departed to join his regiment which had arrived in Jamaica. Margaret lived on alone at the cottage, not associating much with the other inhabitants, but amusing herself with her books and flowers and garden. She was kind to those about her, especially in times of illness, and was devoted to children, whom she always made welcome.

"When M. Danseville came to Dartmouth he was attracted by the appearance of the cottage, called to enquire if he could be lodged there, and received an affirmative answer.

"He was very genial and companionable, talked freely of his home, and wife, and family in France, and of his change of fortune. A few still remember the courtly old gentleman with silver hair and charming manners, who made himself happy under adverse circumstances. Margaret Floyer was always in easy circumstances. Remittances arrived punctually from England, and her wants were few. M. Danseville, feeling that it might be years before be could return to France, and to fill his leisure time, induced Margaret Floyer to consent to the building of a larger house on another part of her property. The result was a long, low, stone cottage with a flat roof, set in a sheltered situation, and surrounded by forest trees. Here he spent a great deal of time in laying out and ornamenting the grounds. Before the new house was quite finished, the one where they bad been living was destroyed by fire during their temporary absence from home in the summer. They took possession of the new house and personally supervised its completion, and 'Brook House,' as it was called, from its neatness and pretty appearance, became the admiration of passers-by. At 'Brook House' the two lived together until 1814, when news came to Halifax that Napoleon was a prisoner on the Island of Elba. M. Danseville was overjoyed at the Restoration of the Royal Family. He at once dressed himself in his long-unused uniform, put on his hat with its white cockade, and walked up and down the road during the whole afternoon of one day, shouting 'Vive La France!' He took passage in the next ship bound for France, and parted with the lady who had given him shelter with every demonstration of friendship and regret.

"After his departure Margaret Floyer led a more retired life than ever, and developed erysipelas. She was found one morning unconscious in her room, and presently expired. Sir John Wentworth announced her death to her family in England. Her nephew, John Gould Floyer, gave Sir John a power of attorney to administer her estate, and Mr. John Waite Attorney, Mayor of Boston, her brother-in-law, represented the claimant in England. Correspondence passed between Halifax and England during the four years from 1815 to 1819, and eventually the property was sold and the balance remitted. Margaret Floyor was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, and her spirit was said to have been seen wandering about her grave. Her relations in England caused a large stone slab to be placed over her grave. The inscription is as follows:

AGED 60 YEARS

Daughter of Capt. William Floyer of Reesby Hall, and Frances Ayscoghe


Inscription

SACRED / TO THE MEMORY OF / MARGARET FLOYER / A NATIVE OF ENGLAND / DIED THE 8TH DEC. 1815 / AGED 60 YEARS

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

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