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Col Samuel Taylor Marshall

Col Samuel Taylor Marshall

Birth
Oxford, Butler County, Ohio, USA
Death 13 Jun 1895 (aged 83)
Keokuk County, Iowa, USA
Burial Keota, Keokuk County, Iowa, USA
Memorial ID 15172888 · View Source
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near Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio; educated in Miami University, at Oxford, from which he graduated in 1840; he studied law a few months in Cincinnati; went from there to LaFayette, Ind., and continued his studies in the office of Pettit & Orth, leading lawyers of that State; he joined the Patriot Expedition to Canada, was captured, and suffered much in prison from July, 1841, until February, 1842; he holds a commission as Lieutenant Colonel received in that service; in December, 1842, he came to Fort Madison, and the county seat being located at West Point, he began the practice of law there in February, 1843; in 1846, Mr. Marshall came to this city; has practiced and resided here ever since, with good success. Mr. Marshall married on the 26th of February, 1846, to Miss Louisa Patterson, daughter of Col. Wm. Patterson, of this city, and has had a family of ten children, six now living.
(Ref: Lee County History, Biographical Sketches, Keokuk, City)

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(ref: The Daily Gate City, Keokuk, Ia., Sep 21, 1914, Page 7.)
(extracted from the announcement of Sabret Taylor Marshall, son of Samuel Taylor Marshall.)
The father of the deceased, COl. Samuel Taylor Marshall, a prominent pioneer lawyer of the county married a daughter of Colonel Patterson, and located at Keokuk, where he was known for his many sterling qualities. Besides ranking among the leading members of the bar, for a time he had editorial connection with "Nip and Tuck." a daily paper published in Keokuk in the early days. He was a college man from Oxford college, Ohio, located in his native town. He was a Lieutenant colonel from a military organization in Ohio to join what was known as the Patriots, which served at the time of the invasion of Canada. Captured by the British troops, he and a comrade were thrown into prison, tried and sentenced to be fined and transported to Van Diemansland. Mr. Marshall's cool indifference to his fate, caused him to be released. When he was captured by the British troops he had on his person his commission as lieutenant colonel, a dangerous document to possess in war times, when a pioneer in the hands of the enemy. This document Mr. Marshall chewed and swallowed. But the short hardship and suffering he endured while in the hands of the British soldiery brought on a serious illness. In December 1842, when Iowa was very young, wearing her territorial clothes, he arrived in Lee county and entered upon his active career here, and Lee county is better perhaps, that he came here. He was a man of much reading, history and general literature as well as law, was a friends always to the young students and gave them valuable aid and encouragement in their pursuit of knowledge.


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  • Created by: mulder
  • Added: 6 Aug 2006
  • Find A Grave Memorial 15172888
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Col Samuel Taylor Marshall (26 Feb 1812–13 Jun 1895), Find A Grave Memorial no. 15172888, citing Keota Cemetery, Keota, Keokuk County, Iowa, USA ; Maintained by mulder (contributor 46825092) .